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Dan O'Brien [16]Daniel O'Brien [6]
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Profile: Dan O'brien (Oxford Brookes University)
  1. Alan Bailey & Dan O'Brien (eds.) (2012). The Continuum Companion to Hume. Continuum.
    The Continuum Companion to Hume is a comprehensive and accessible guide to Hume's life and work includes 21 specially commissioned essays, written by a team of leading experts, covering every aspect of Hume's thought. The Companion presents details of Hume's life, historical and philosophical context, a comprehensive overview of all the key themes and topics apparent in his work, including his accounts of causal reasoning, scepticism, the soul and the self, action, reason, free will, miracles, natural religion, politics, human nature, (...)
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  2. Dan O'Brien (2012). Hume and the Intellectual Virtues. Discipline Filosofiche 22 (2):153-172.
    For Hume virtues are character traits that are useful and agreeable to ourselves and to others. Such traits are wide-ranging, from moral virtues such as benevolence to intellectual virtues such as courage of mind and penetration. This paper focuses on Hume’s account of the latter. I argue that Hume is a virtue epistemologist, principally interested in the role that intellectual character traits play in social interactions rather than in the justifiedness of particular beliefs. I shall argue that this interpretation is (...)
     
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  3. Dan O'brien (2010). A Feminist Interpretation of Hume on Testimony. Hypatia 25 (3):632 - 652.
    Hume is usually taken to have an evidentialist account of testimonial belief: one is justified in believing what someone says if one has empincal evidence that they have been reliable in the past. This account is impartialist: such evidence is required no matter who the person is, or what refotions she may have to you. I, however, argue that Hume has another account of testimony, one grounded in sympathy. This account is partialist, in that empincal evidence is not required in (...)
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  4. Dan O'Brien (2010). Cultivating Our Garden : David Hume and Gardening as Therapy. In , Gardening - Philosophy for Everyone: Cultivating Wisdom. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  5. Dan O'Brien (ed.) (2010). Gardening - Philosophy for Everyone: Cultivating Wisdom. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Each book in this series takes a easy-to-understand philosophic look at a particular aspect of everyday life or pop culture.
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  6. Dan O'Brien (2009). Communication Between Friends. Empedocles 1 (1):27-41.
  7. Dan O'Brien (2008). Hume On Sexual Attraction. Philosophical Frontiers: A Journal of Emerging Thought 3 (2).
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  8. Daniel O'Brien, Clifford M. Rees, Ernest Abbott, Elisabeth Belmont, Amy Eiden, Patrick M. Libbey, Gilberto Chavez & Mary des Vignes-Kendrick (2008). Improving Information and Best Practices for Public Health Emergency Legal Preparedness. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (s1):64-67.
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  9. Clifford M. Rees, Daniel O'Brien, Peter A. Briss, Joan Miles, Poki Namkung & Patrick M. Libbey (2008). Assessing Information and Best Practices for Public Health Emergency Legal Preparedness. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (s1):42-46.
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  10. Eric Hargan, Daniel O'Brien, Susan Sherman & Georges Benjamin (2007). Vaccine Law 101. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35:72-76.
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  11. Dan O'Brien (2007). Testimony and Lies. Philosophical Quarterly 57 (227):225–238.
    In certain situations, lies can be used to pass on knowledge. The kinds of cases I focus on are those involving a speaker's devious manipulation of the hearer's irrational or prejudiced thought. These cases show that sometimes a speaker's knowledge of a hearer's mind is necessary for the testimonial transmission of knowledge. They also support a 'seeding' model of knowledge transmission, rather than one that is akin to the postal delivery of complete parcels of information.
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  12. Dan O'Brien (2006). An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge. Polity Press.
    An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge guides the reader through the key issues and debates in contemporary epistemology. Lucid, comprehensive and accessible, it is an ideal textbook for students who are new to the subject and for university undergraduates. The book is divided into five parts. Part I discusses the concept of knowledge and distinguishes between different types of knowledge. Part II surveys the sources of knowledge, considering both a priori and a posteriori knowledge. Parts III and IV provide (...)
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  13. Dan O'Brien (2006). Introduction to the Epistemology of Testimony. Philosophica 78.
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  14. Dan O'Brien (2006). Testimony, Engineered Knowledge and Internalism. Philosophica 78.
    Testimonial knowledge sometimes depends on internalist epistemic conditions, those that thinkers are able to reflect upon. In the testimony literature the only internalist conditions that are considered are those concerning a hearer's knowledge of a speaker's reliability. I argue, however, that the relevant sense of internal"" should not be seen as referring to just the hearer's point of view, but rather to the points of view of both the hearer and the speaker. There are certain cases of testimonial knowledge transmission (...)
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  15. Daniel O'Brien (2006). Gullible Yet Intelligible. Abstracta 3 (1):46-73.
    In this paper I describe the imaginary community of Gullible. Gulliblians are led by moral pressures to believe whatever they are told and, in the scenario that I sketch, this leads to them having widespread contradictory beliefs. This community is nevertheless intelligible to us given what we know about their situation and their moral code. Davidson, however, holds there to be what I call a logicist constraint on interpretation: thinkers can only be interpreted if a good proportion of their beliefs (...)
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  16. Dan O'Brien (2004). Robert J. Fogelin, A Defense of Hume on Miracles Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 24 (2):100-102.
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  17. Dan O'Brien, John Paul Slosar & Anthony R. Tersigni (2004). Utilitarian Pessimism, Human Dignity, and the Vegetative State: A Practical Analysis of the Papal Allocution. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 4 (3):497-512.
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  18. Dan O'Brien (2003). Pathways to Knowledge: Private and Public By Alvin I. Goldman Oxford University Press, 2002. Ix + 224 Pp., £25. [REVIEW] Philosophy 78 (2):289-307.
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  19. Dan O'Brien (2003). John Symons, On Dennett Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (4):289-291.
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  20. Dan O'Brien (2003). Virtually Philosophy. Techné 7 (2):143-145.
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  21. Daniel O'Brien, Objects of Perception. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  22. John Paul Slosar & Daniel O'Brien (2003). The Ethics of Neonatal Male Circumcision: A Catholic Perspective. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (2):62-64.
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