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Profile: Dan Robins (University of Hong Kong)
  1. Dan Robins (2012). Mohist Care. Philosophy East and West 62 (1):60-91.
    As the Mohist doctrine of inclusive care (jian ai 兼愛) is usually understood, it is an affront to both human nature and commonsense morality.1 We are told that the Mohists rejected all particularist ties, especially to family, in the interests of a radically universalist ethic.2 But love for those close to us is deeply rooted in our natures, and few would deny that this love has moral significance. If the Mohists did deny this, it would be easy to dismiss them, (...)
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  2. Dan Robins (2012). Names, Cranes, and the Later Moists. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (3):369-385.
  3. Dan Robins (2012). Reply to Ian Johnston. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (2):271-272.
    Reply to Ian Johnston Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-2 DOI 10.1007/s11712-012-9274-1 Authors Dan Robins, School of Arts and Humanities, The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, 101 Vera King Farris Drive, Galloway, NJ 08205, USA Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009.
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  4. Dan Robins (2011). Ian Johnston, The Mozi: A Complete Translation. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (4):551-556.
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  5. Dan Robins (2011). Reply to Hutton. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (4):531-534.
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  6. Dan Robins (2011). The Later Mohists and Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 31 (3):247-285.
    This article is a study of the Later Mohists' 'Lesser Selection (Xiaoqu)', which, more than any other early Chinese text, seems to engage in the study of logic. I focus on a procedure that the Mohists called mou . Arguments by mou are grounded in linguistic parallelism, implying perhaps that the Mohists were on the way to a formal analysis of argumentation. However, their main aim was to head off arguments by mou that targeted their own doctrines, and if their (...)
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  7. Dan Robins (2011). The Warring States Concept of Xing. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (1):31-51.
    This essay defends a novel interpretation of the term xìng 性 as it occurs in Chinese texts of the late Warring States period (roughly 320–221 BCE). The term played an important role both in the famous controversy over the goodness or badness of people’s xìng and elsewhere in the intellectual discourse of the period. Extending especially the work of A.C. Graham, the essay stresses the importance for understanding xìng of early Chinese assumptions about spontaneity, continuity, health, and (in the human (...)
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  8. Dan Robins (2008). The Moists and the Gentlemen of the World. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (3):385-402.
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  9. Dan Robins, Xunzi. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  10. Dan Robins (2001-2002). The Development of Xunzi's Theory of Xing. Early China 26:99-158.
    The section of the Xunzi called "Xing e" 性惡 (xing is bad) prominently and repeatedly claims that people's xing is bad. However, no other text in the Xunzi makes this claim, and it is widely thought that the claim does not express Xunzi's fundamental ideas about human nature. This article addresses the issue in a somewhat indirect way, beginning with a detailed examination of the text of "Xing e": identifying a core text, removing a series of interpolations, analyzing the structure (...)
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  11. Dan Robins (2001). The Debate Over Human Nature in Warring States China. Dissertation, University of Hong Kong
    (Uncorrected OCR) Abstract of thesis entitled The Debate over Human Nature in Warring States China submitted by Dan Robins for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Hong Kong in April 2001 This dissertation is an account of the most famous disagreement in early Chinese philosophy. The disagreement is usually thought to have taken place between Mencius (c. 385-303 BC) and <span class='Hi'>Xunzi</span> (c. 310-230 BC) (the two most prominent Confucians of the Warring States period), and to (...)
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