Search results for 'Dangerously mentally ill' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. James L. Werth, Elizabeth Reynolds Welfel & G. Andrew H. Benjamin (eds.) (2009). The Duty to Protect: Ethical, Legal, and Professional Considerations for Mental Health Professionals. American Psychological Association.score: 195.0
     
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  2. Amelie Perron, Trudy Rudge & Dave Holmes (2010). Citizen Minds, Citizen Bodies: The Citizenship Experience and the Government of Mentally Ill Persons. Nursing Philosophy 11 (2):100-111.score: 172.0
    The concept of citizenship is becoming more and more prominent in specific fields, such as psychiatry/mental health, where it is constituted as a solution to the issues of exclusion, discrimination, and poverty often endured by the mentally ill. We argue that such discourse of citizenship represents a break in the history of psychiatry and constitutes a powerful strategy to counter the effects of equally powerful psychiatric labelling. However, we call into question the emancipatory promise of a citizenship agenda. Foucault's (...)
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  3. Joseph D. Bloom (2010). “The Incarceration Revolution”1: The Abandonment of the Seriously Mentally Ill to Our Jails and Prisons. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):727-734.score: 168.0
    It is well known that today jails and prisons house many seriously mentally ill citizens who in prior decades have been treated in mental hospitals and community mental health programs. This paper begins with a brief review of the history of support for mental health programs at the federal level and then, using the State of Oregon as an example, describes the new state era of mental health services which is characterized by the increasing use of the criminal justice (...)
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  4. Michael Cholbi (2009). Tonkens on the Irrationality of the Suicidally Mentally Ill. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (1):102-106.score: 168.0
    abstract Ryan Tonkens proposes that my Kantian approach to suicide intervention with respect to the mentally ill (2002) wrongly assumes that the suicidally mentally ill are rational and are therefore rational agents to whom Kantian moral constraints ought to apply. Here I indicate how the empirical evidence concerning the suicidally mentally ill does not support Tonkens' criticism that the suicidally mentally ill are irrational. In particular, that evidence does not support the conclusion that such individuals are (...)
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  5. R. D. Strous (2009). To Protect or to Publish: Confidentiality and the Fate of the Mentally Ill Victims of Nazi Euthanasia. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (6):361-364.score: 168.0
    In Nazi Germany, approximately 200 000 mentally ill people were murdered under the guise of euthanasia. Relatively little is known regarding the fate of the Jewish mentally ill patients targeted in this process, long before the Holocaust officially began. For the Nazis, Jewish mentally ill patients were doubly cursed since they embodied both “precarious genes” and “racial toxin”. To preserve the memory of the victims, Yad Vashem, the leading institution dedicated to documentation of the Holocaust, actively collects (...)
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  6. S. Pattison & P. Armitage (1986). An Ethical Analysis of the Policies of British Community and Hospital Care for Mentally Ill People. Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (3):136-142.score: 168.0
    Scant consideration has been given to the ethical implications of the policy of closing down psychiatric hospitals in favour of community care. The recent adherents of this policy in government have been enthusiastic in encouraging its implementation. This paper has three sections: a brief resumé of the history and principles of community care for the mentally ill; a discussion on the merits and de-merits of psychiatric care in the hospital and in the community; and an outline of some preliminary (...)
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  7. L. Fields (1987). Exoneration of the Mentally Ill. Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (4):201-205.score: 149.3
    Mental illness may be manifested in the impairment of understanding or of volitional control. Impairment of understanding may be manifested in delusions. Impairment of volitional control is shown when a person is unable to act in accordance with good reasons that he himself accepts. In order for an impairment of understanding or of self-control to exculpate, the offence must be causally connected with the impairment in question. The rationale of exculpation in general, which applies also to the case of mental (...)
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  8. T. Szasz (2003). Psychiatry and the Control of Dangerousness: On the Apotropaic Function of the Term “Mental Illness”. Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (4):227-230.score: 145.0
  9. T. Szasz (2003). Response To: Comments on Psychiatry and the Control of Dangerousness: On the Apotropaic Function of the Term "Mental Illness". Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (4):237-237.score: 145.0
  10. Jacob M. Appel (2007). A Suicide Right for the Mentally Ill? A Swiss Case Opens a New Debate. Hastings Center Report 37 (3):21-23.score: 140.0
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  11. James B. Brady (1997). Carl Elliott, the Rules of Insanity: Moral Responsibility and the Mentally Ill. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 31 (4):579-581.score: 140.0
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  12. Nathaniel Laor (1984). The Paradox of Autonomy: The Case of the Mentally Ill. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 18 (2):159-166.score: 140.0
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  13. Frank Kortmann (1998). Elliott, C.: 1996, The Rules of Insanity; Moral Responsibility and the Mentally Ill Offender. [REVIEW] Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (2):178-179.score: 140.0
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  14. R. S. Downie (1997). The Rules of Insanity: Moral Responsibility and the Mentally Ill Offender. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (3):196-197.score: 140.0
  15. Nathaniel Laor (1984). The Autonomy of the Mentally Ill: A Case-Study in Individualistic Ethics. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 14 (3):331-349.score: 140.0
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  16. Dan W. Brock (1993). A Proposal for the Use of Advance Directives in the Treatment of Incompetent Mentally Ill Persons. Bioethics 7 (2-3):247-256.score: 140.0
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  17. Michael A. Pawel (2001). Commentary: Imprisoning the Mentally Ill: Does It Matter? Criminal Justice Ethics 20 (1):2-66.score: 140.0
  18. Theda Rehbock (2013). How to Respect the Will of Mentally Ill Persons? Studia Philosophica Estonica 6 (2):22-37.score: 140.0
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  19. Susan Haberstroh Rockford (1983). More on the Right to Refuse Treatment: Brother Fox and the Mentally Ill in New York. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 11 (1):19-21.score: 140.0
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  20. Mayelin Prieto-Gonzalez (2003). Supreme Court Limits Permissible Scope of Government's Ability to Force Medication of Mentally Ill Defendants. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):737-739.score: 140.0
  21. Y. Melamed (2000). Working with Mentally Ill Homeless Persons: Should We Respect Their Quest for Anonymity? Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (3):175-178.score: 140.0
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  22. Julian Savulescu & Donna Dickenson (1998). The Time Frame of Preferences, Dispositions, and the Validity of Advance Directives for the Mentally Ill. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (3):225-246.score: 140.0
  23. Melissa McDonnell & Robert T. M. Phillips (2010). Physicians Should Treat Mentally Ill Death Row Inmates, Even If Treatment Is Refused. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):774-788.score: 140.0
    Competency to be executed evaluations are conducted with a clear understanding that no physician-patient relationship exists. Treatment however, is not so neatly re-categorized in large measure because it involves the physician's active provision of the healing arts. A natural tension exists between what practices may be legally permissible and what are ethically acceptable. We present an overview of the existing positions on this matter in the process of framing our argument.
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  24. Dr Yuval Melamed (2001). Hospitalised Mentally Ill Patients Vote in Israel. Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (5):355-355.score: 140.0
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  25. Sally Burgess (1998). Commentary on" The Time Frame of Preferences, Dispositions, and the Validity of Advance Directives for the Mentally Ill". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (3):255-258.score: 140.0
  26. P. G. Campbell (1986). An Ethical Analysis of the Policies of British Community and Hospital Care for Mentally Ill People: A Commentary. Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (3):141-142.score: 140.0
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  27. Aaron E. Hinkley (2013). From the End-of-Life to the Possibility of Nonvoluntary Euthanasia of the Mentally Ill: Bioethics in a Broken Culture. Christian Bioethics 19 (1):1-6.score: 140.0
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  28. K. Usher & C. Holmes (1997). Ethical Aspects of Phenomenological Research with Mentally Ill People. Nursing Ethics 4 (1):49-56.score: 140.0
    Given the dramatic rise in the frequency of nursing research that involves eliciting personal information, one would expect that attempts to maintain the balance between the aspirations of researchers and the needs and rights of patients would lead to extensive discussion of the ethical issues arising. However, they have received little attention in the literature. This paper outlines and discusses some of the issues associated with qualitative research. The discussion converges on the specific case of phenomenological research, which involves the (...)
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  29. Dan W. Brock (1998). Commentary on" The Time Frame of Preferences, Dispositions, and the Validity of Advance Directives for the Mentally Ill". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (3):251-253.score: 140.0
  30. Rebecca Dresser (1998). Commentary on" The Time Frame of Preferences, Dispositions, and the Validity of Advance Directives for the Mentally Ill". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (3):247-249.score: 140.0
  31. W. Norwood East (1938). The Mentally Ill in America. The Eugenics Review 30 (1):65.score: 140.0
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  32. A. McCall-Smith (1987). Exoneration of the Mentally Ill. Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (4):206-208.score: 140.0
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  33. Andrew Pessin (1994). The New Schizophrenia: Diagnosis and Dynamics of the Homeless Mentally Ill. Journal of Mind and Behavior 15 (3):199-222.score: 140.0
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  34. Belinda Schwehr (1998). Resource Allocation for the Mentally Ill: A Question of Law and Politics. Health Care Analysis 6 (3):233-236.score: 140.0
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  35. Pierre Bertaux (1993). Was Holderlin Mentally Ill? Philosophy Today 37 (4):353-368.score: 140.0
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  36. Nigel Lg Eastman (1998). Commentary on" The Time Frame of Preferences, Dispositions, and the Validity of Advance Directives for the Mentally Ill". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (3):259-261.score: 140.0
  37. C. Elliott, S. Parry & S. G. Post (2004). Mentally Disabled and Mentally Ill Persons. Research Issues. Encyclopedia of Bioethics 3.score: 140.0
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  38. Mary Mahowald & Virginia Abernethy (1985). Case Studies: When A Mentally Ill Woman Refuses Abortion: With Commentaries. Hastings Center Report 15 (April):22-23.score: 140.0
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  39. Mary Mahowald & Virginia Abernethy (1985). When a Mentally Ill Woman Refuses Abortion. Hastings Center Report 15 (2):22-23.score: 140.0
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  40. I. A. Menkiti (1980). Criminal Responsibility and the Mentally Ill. Journal of Value Inquiry 14 (3-4):181-194.score: 140.0
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  41. Amélie Perron & Dave Holmes (2011). Constructing Mentally Ill Inmates: Nurses' Discursive Practices in Corrections. Nursing Inquiry 18 (3):191-204.score: 140.0
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  42. Norman G. Poythress (2002). Obtaining Informed Consent for Research: A Model for Use with Participants Who Are Mentally Ill. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (3):367-374.score: 140.0
  43. Norman Quist (1984). The Right to Refuse Psychotropic Drugs, by N. Rhoden; a Common Law Remedy for Forcible Medication of the Institutionalized Mentally Ill (Note), by J. Bioethics Reporter 1 (1):262.score: 140.0
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  44. Marga Reimer (2010). Childhood Trauma and the Mentally Ill Parent: Reconciling Moral and Medical Conceptions of" What Really Happened". Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (3):265-267.score: 140.0
  45. John R. Wettersten (1987). Can the Mentally Ill Be Autonomous? Philosophica 40.score: 140.0
  46. Christopher Ryan (2011). One Flu Over The Cuckoo's Nest: Comparing Legislated Coercive Treatment for Mental Illness with That for Other Illness. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (1):87-93.score: 108.0
    Many of the world’s mental health acts, including all Australian legislation, allow for the coercive detention and treatment of people with mental illnesses if they are deemed likely to harm themselves or others. Numerous authors have argued that legislated powers to impose coercive treatment in psychiatric illness should pivot on the presence or absence of capacity not likely harm, but no Australian act uses this criterion. In this paper, I add a novel element to these arguments by comparing the use (...)
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  47. M. M. Large, C. J. Ryan, O. B. Nielssen & R. A. Hayes (2008). The Danger of Dangerousness: Why We Must Remove the Dangerousness Criterion From Our Mental Health Acts. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (12):877-881.score: 107.7
    Objectives: The mental health legislation of most developed countries includes either a dangerousness criterion or an obligatory dangerousness criterion (ODC). A dangerousness criterion holds that mentally ill people may be given treatment without consent if they are deemed to be a risk to themselves or others. An ODC holds that mentally ill people may be given treatment without consent only if they are deemed to be a risk to themselves or others. This paper argues that the dangerousness criterion (...)
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  48. S. Nassir Ghaemi (2007). The Concepts of Psychiatry: A Pluralistic Approach to the Mind and Mental Illness. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 99.0
    The status quo: dogmatism, the biopsychosocial model, and alternatives -- What there is: of mind and brain -- How we know: understanding the mind -- What is scientific method? -- Reading Karl Jaspers's General Psychopathology -- What is scientific method in psychiatry? -- Darwin's dangerous method: the essentialist fallacy -- What we value: the ethics of psychiatry -- Desire and self: Hellenistic and Islamic approaches -- On the nature of mental illness: disease or myth? -- Order out of chaos: from (...)
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  49. Tamara Kayali Browne (forthcoming). Is Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder Really a Disorder? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-18.score: 75.7
    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) was recently moved to a full category in the DSM-5 (the latest edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders). It also appears set for inclusion as a separate disorder in the ICD-11 (the upcoming edition of the World Health Organization’s International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems). This paper argues that PMDD should not be listed in the DSM or the ICD at all, adding to the call to (...)
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  50. Matthew Broome, Lisa Bortolotti & Matteo Mameli (2010). Moral Responsibility and Mental Illness: A Case Study. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (19):179-187.score: 74.7
    It is far too early to say what global impact the neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric sciences will have on our intuitions about moral responsibility. And it is far too early to say whether the notion of moral responsibility will survive this impact (and if so, in what form). But it is certainly worth starting to think about the local impact that these sciences can or should have on some of our distinctions and criteria. It might be possible to use some of (...)
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