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  1. Daniel A. Putman (2012). A Reply to 'Scepticism About the Virtue Ethics Approach to Nursing Ethics' by Stephen Holland: The Relevance of Virtue in Nursing Ethics. Nursing Philosophy 13 (2):142-145.
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  2. Daniel A. Putman (1998). Human Excellence: Dialogues on Virtue Theory. University Press of America.
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  3. Daniel A. Putman (1996). What Exactly Is the Good of Self-Deception? International Journal of Applied Philosophy 10 (2):17-23.
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  4. Daniel A. Putman (1988). Virtue and the Practice of Modern Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 13 (4):433-443.
    Robert Veatch has claimed that virtue theory is not only irrelevant but potentially dangerous in medical ethics. I argue that virtue is a far more prominent factor in contemporary medical practice than Veatch admits. Even if ‘stranger medicine’ is taken as the norm, proper conduct on the part of physicians depends on certain character traits in order to be maintained consistently over a long period of time and in situations which run counter to the physician's own interests. Right conduct, which (...)
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  5. Daniel A. Putman (1987). Rights and Virtues: Toward an Integrated Theory. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 21 (2):87-99.
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  6. Daniel A. Putman (1987). Virtue and Self-Deception. Southern Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):549-557.
    Self-Deception has traditionally been discussed in the literature in utilitarian terms. I argue in this paper that, As a defect of character, Self-Deception can be understood much more clearly using the concepts of virtue theory. I apply macintyre's distinction between internal and external goods and his discussion about the unity of a life-Narrative to self-Deception. The result is to clarify why self-Deception is a vice and when it might be justified on utilitarian grounds.
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  7. Daniel A. Putman (1987). Why Instrumental Music has No Shame. British Journal of Aesthetics 27 (1):55-61.
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  8. Daniel A. Putman (1985). Ethical Decisions and Contrary-to-Fact Conditionals. Review of Metaphysics 39 (1):47 - 55.
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  9. Daniel A. Putman (1985). Music and the Metaphor of Touch. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 44 (1):59-66.
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  10. Daniel A. Putman (1983). Doubting, Thinking, and Possible Worlds. Philosophy Research Archives 9:337-346.
    Kripke has noted that possible worlds are stipulated, not discovered, and that the stipulation of these worlds allows us to separate accidental from essential properties. In this paper I argue that possible worlds theory gives us an important tool for analyzing what Descartes is doing in the Meditations. The first Meditation becomes a thought experiment in which possible realities are stipulated in a search for one or more essential properties. Viewing the doubt in this manner sheds new light on the (...)
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  11. Daniel A. Putman (1982). Natural Kinds and Human Artifacts. Mind 91 (363):418-419.
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  12. Daniel A. Putman (1981). Sophomore Seminars in Two-Year Colleges. Teaching Philosophy 4 (2):151-158.
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