299 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Daniel C. Dennett [298]Daniel Clement Dennett [1]
  1. J. Brockman & Daniel C. Dennett, How to Make Mistakes.
    Making mistakes is the key to making progress. There are times, of course, when it is important not to make any mistakes--ask any surgeon or airline pilot. But it is less widely appreciated that there are also times when making mistakes is the secret of success. What I have in mind is not just the familiar wisdom of nothing ventured, nothing gained. While that maxim encourages a healthy attitude towards risk, it doesn't point to the positive benefits of not just (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Daniel C. Dennett, Altruists, Chumps, and Inconstant Pluralists.
    Anybody interested in evolutionary explanations of social phenomena (and every philosopher should be) will learn a lot from Unto Others. In addition to its cornucopia of fascinating empirical findings from biology and psychology, it is chock full of arresting perspectives, ingenious thought experiments, and clear expositions of difficult-indeed, treacherous-concepts that should be in every philosopher's kit. What philosophers will not learn, however, is the status of group selection in current evolutionary theory, because while Sober and Wilson (hereafter S&W) strive intelligently (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Daniel C. Dennett, An Overview of My Work in Philosophy.
    In my opinion, the two main topics in the <span class='Hi'>philosophy</span> of mind are content and consciousness, and they have received about equal attention from me. As the title of my first book, Content and Consciousness (1969) suggested, that is the order in which they must be addressed: first, a theory of content or intentionality--a phenomenon more fundamental than consciousness--and then, building on that foundation, a theory of consciousness. Over the years I have found myself recapitulating this basic structure twice, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Daniel C. Dennett, Comments on Evan Thompson, Mind in Life.
    I have learned a lot from Evan Thompson’s book–his scholarship is formidable, and his taste for relatively overlooked thinkers is admirable–but I keep stumbling over the strain induced by his self-assigned task of demonstrating that his heroes–Varela and Maturana, Merleau-Ponty and (now) Husserl, Oyama and Moss and others–have shattered the comfortable assumptions of orthodoxy, and outlined radical new approaches to the puzzles of life and mind. The irony is that Thompson is such a clear and conscientious expositor that he makes (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Daniel C. Dennett, Could There Be a Darwinian Account of Human Creativity?
    Weaver birds create intricate nests; sculptors and other artists and artisans also create intricate, ingenious constructions out of similar materials. The products may look similar, and outwardly the creative processes that create those processes may look similar, but there are surely large and important differences between them. What are they, and how important are they? The weaverbird nestmaking is ‘instinctual,’ and ‘controlled by the genes’ some would say, but we know that this is a crude approximation of a more interesting (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Daniel C. Dennett, Evolutionary Psychology.
    There are systemic features of contemporary Christianity that create an almost invisible class of non-believing clergy, ensnared in their ministries by a web of obligations, constraints, comforts, and community. Exemplars from five Protestant denominations, Southern Baptist, United Church of Christ, Presbyterian, Methodist and Church of Christ, were found and confidentially interviewed at length about their lives, religious education and indoctrination, aspirations, problems and ways of coping. The in-depth, qualitative interviews formed the basis for profiles of all five, together with general (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Daniel C. Dennett, Faith in the Truth.
    Is mathematics a religion at all? Is science? One often hears these days that science is "just" another religion. There are some interesting similarities. Established science, like established religion, has its bureaucracies and hierarchies of officials, its lavish and arcane installations of no utility apparent to outsiders, its initiation ceremonies. Like a religion bent on enlarging its congregation, it has a huge phalanx of proselytizers--who call themselves not missionaries but educators.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Daniel C. Dennett, Kinds of Things—Towards a Bestiary of the Manifest Image.
    Consider this chess puzzle. White to checkmate in two. It appeared recently in the Boston Globe, and what startled me about it was that I had thought it had been proven that you can’t checkmate with a lone knight (and a king, of course). This is a counterexample, a strange circumstance that can arise in a legal game of chess. This fact is a higher-order truth of chess, namely that the “proof” that you can never checkmate with a lone knight (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Daniel C. Dennett, On Failures of Freedom & the Fear of Science.
    Allen Funt was one of the great psychologists of the twentieth century. His informal demonstrations on Candid Camera showed us as much about human psychology and its surprising limitations as the work of any academic psychologist. Here is one of the best (as I recall it many years later): he placed an umbrella stand in a prominent place in a department store and filled it with shiny new golf-cart handles. These were pieces of strong, gleaming stainless steel tubing, about two (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Daniel C. Dennett, Preachers Who Are Not Believers.
    Are there clergy who don’t believe in God? Certainly there are former clergy who fall in this category. Before making their life-wrenching decisions, they were secret nonbelievers. Who knows how many like-minded pastors discover that they simply cannot take this mortal leap from the pulpit and then go on to live out their ministries in secret disbelief? What is it like to be a pastor who doesn’t believe in God? John Updike gave us a moving account in his brilliant novel, (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Daniel C. Dennett, Review of Cairns-Smith, Evolving the Mind. [REVIEW]
    After decades of persistent work by researchers in many fields, building foundations and patiently filling in details, the gigantic jigsaw puzzle of consciousness is beginning to come into focus. As large assemblies fall into place with a gratifying convergence of details drawn from different disciplines, the pace is quickening. Everybody wants to be in on the delicious task of describing what the Big Picture is going to look like, predicting the outlines before the mopping up operations confirm them. Well, not (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Daniel C. Dennett, Seeing is Believing..
    We would all like to have a good theory of perception. Such a theory would account for all the known phenomena and predict novel phenomena, explaining everything in terms of processes occurring in nervous systems in accordance with the principles and laws already established by science: the principles of optics, physics, biochemistry, and the like. Such a theory might come to exist without our ever having to answer the awkward "philosophical" question that arises.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Daniel C. Dennett, The Case of the Tell-Tale Traces: A Mystery Solved; a Skyhook Grounded.
    Michael Behe's book is an interesting attempt at a frontal assault on Darwinism, based on an analysis of the complexities of molecular structures inside the cell--Darwin's black box.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Daniel C. Dennett, The Evolution of Evaluators.
    We have values and aspirations. What of other animals? Are their "values" different from ours? Animals manifestly prefer having plenty of food to starvation, and comfort to pain, and they will work hard to obtain a mate. But beyond these "creature comforts," they seem to be largely indifferent to the prospects and anxieties that make up human life. A suitable coverall term for human aspiration would be the pursuit of happiness, bearing in mind that happiness is many different things to (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Daniel C. Dennett, The Scope of Natural Selection.
    The author replies to H. Allen Orr's review of "Darwin's Dangrous Idea" (Boston Review, Summer 1996).
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Daniel C. Dennett, Unbelievable: That's What Religion is, Says Christopher Hitchens in His Profoundly Skeptical Manifesto.
    In earlier ages reliable information was rather hard to get, and in general people could be excused for taking the founding myths of their religions on faith. These were the "facts" that "everyone knew," and anybody who had a skeptical itch could check it out with the local priest or rabbi or imam, or other religious authority. Today, there is really no excuse for such ignorance. It may not be your fault if you don't know the facts about the (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Daniel C. Dennett, Who's On First?
    There is a pattern of miscommunication bedeviling the people working on consciousness that is reminiscent of the classic Abbott and CostelloWhos on First?’ routine. With (...)the best of intentions, people are talking past each other, seeing major disagreements when there are only terminological or tactical preferencesor even just matters of emphasisthat divide the sides. Since some substantive differences also lurk in this confusion, it is well worth trying to sort out. Much of the problem seems to have been caused by some misdirection in my apologia for heterophenomenology (Dennett, 1982; 1991), advertised as an explicitly third-person approach to human consciousness, so I will try to make amends by first removing those misleading signposts and sending us back to the real issues. On the face of it, the study of human consciousness involves phenomena that seem to occupy something rather like another dimension: the private, subjective, ‘first-persondimension. Everybody agrees that this is where we start. What, then, is the relation between the standardthird-personobjective methodologies for studying meteors or magnets (or human metabolism or bone density), and the methodologies for studying human consciousness? Can the standard methods be extended in such a way as to do justice to the phenomena of human consciousness? Or do we have to find some quite radical or revolutionary alternative science? I have defended the hypothesis that there is a straightforward, conservative extension of objective science that handsomely covers the groundall the groundof human consciousness, doing justice to all the data without ever having to abandon the rules and constraints of the experimental method that have worked so well in the rest of science. This third-person methodology, dubbed heterophenomenology (phenomenology of another not oneself), is, I have claimed, the sound way to take the first person point of view as seriously as it can be taken.. (shrink)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Daniel C. Dennett & Eva Jablonka, Review for Journal of Evolutionary Biology.
    predators stalk their chosen prey, and so forth. The genius of “instinct†comes in abundant variety, and breeds true. “It must be in the genesâ€â€“that’s what we tend to conclude. But when we do, we may be jumping to conclusions, because there are other possibilities: the clever behavior we observe could be the do-it-yourself invention or discovery of the individual behaver or it could be a clever trick copied from an elder member of its species, most likely one of its (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Daniel C. Dennett & Marcel Kinsbourne, Counting Consciousnesses.
    In a second there is also time enough, we might add. In his dichotomizing fervor, Bogen fails to realize that our argument is neutral with respect to the number of consciousnesses that inhabit the normal or the split-brain skull. Should there be two, for instance, we would point out that within the neural network that subserves each, no privileged locus should be postulated. (Midline location is not the issue--it was only a minor issue for Descartes, in fact.).
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Daniel C. Dennett, Brian Skyrms & Lawrence Sklar, -2001.
    Paul Valéry1 Valéry’s “Variation sur Descartes” excellently evokes the vanishing act that has haunted philosophy ever since Darwin overturned the Cartesian tradition. If my body is composed of nothing but a team of a few trillion robotic cells, mindlessly interacting to produce all the large-scale patterns that tradition would attribute to the nonmechanical workings of my mind, there seems to be nothing left over to be me. Lurking in Darwin’s shadow there is a bugbear: the incredible Disappearing Self.2 One of (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Daniel C. Dennett & W. Wimsatt, The Interpretation of Texts...
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research , L, Supplement, 177-94, Fall 1990. Reprinted in M. Losonsky, ed., Language and Mind: Contemporary Readings in Philosopohy and Cognitive Science, Blackwells, 1995.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Daniel C. Dennett, Artificial Life as Philosophy.
    There are two likely paths for philosophers to follow in their encounters with Artificial Life: they can see it as a new way of doing philosophy, or simply as a new object worthy of philosophical attention using traditional methods. Is Artificial Life best seen as a new philosophical method or a new phenomenon? There is a case to be made for each alternative, but I urge philosophers to take the leap and consider the first to be the more important and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Daniel C. Dennett, Cognitive Science as Reverse Engineering.
    The vivid terms, "Top-down" and "Bottom-up" have become popular in several different contexts in cognitive science. My task today is to sort out some different meanings and comment on the relations between them, and their implications for cognitive science.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Daniel C. Dennett, Do-It-Yourself Understanding.
    One of the virtues of Fred Dretske's recent work has been the salutary openness with which he has described the motivations he discovers controlling his thought, and this candor has brought a submerged confusion close to the surface. Since this confusion is widely shared by philosophers and others working on the problem of content ascription, an analysis of its influence on Dretske will at the same time illuminate the difficulties it is creating for other writers.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Daniel C. Dennett, Errors in Darwin's Dangerous Idea.
    As of January 25, 2006, readers have identified the following errors in Darwin's Dangerous Idea. (I have considered other criticisms offered by readers, but decided that they were in error. Further criticisms are, of course, invited.).
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Daniel C. Dennett, For Journal of Philosophy.
    On the back of the dust jacket of this fine book, one can barely make out two representations of a customized penny for our thoughts, drawn by John Haugeland. Accompanying Honest Abe on the heads side appear the words AExistential Commitment,@ AThought,@ and ASelf;@ while tails shows the Lincoln Memorial and E pluribus unum , surrounded by two unlikely additions: AConstituted Domain, @ and AObjects@. Haugeland explains: AThe basic Kantian/Heideggerian conclusion can be summed up this way: the constituted objective world (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Daniel C. Dennett, Holding a Mirror Up to Dupré.
    Suppose we discovered that all the women in the Slobbovian culture exhibit a strong preference for blue-handled knives and red-handled forks. They would rather starve than eat with utensils of the wrong color. We’d be rightly puzzled, and eager to find an explanation. ‘Well,” these women tell us, “blue-handled knives are snazzier, you know. And just look at them: these red-handled forks are, well, just plain beautiful!” This should not satisfy us. Why do they say this? Their answers may make (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Daniel C. Dennett, Learning & Labeling.
    Clark and Karmiloff-Smith (CKS) have written an extraordinarily valuable paper, which sympathetically addresses what has all too often been an acrimonious and ideology-ridden "debate" and begins to transform it into a multi-perspective research program. By articulating the submerged hunches on both sides in a single framework, and adding some powerful new ideas of their own, they dispel much of the smoke of battle. What we can now see much more clearly is the need for a model of a brain/mind that, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Daniel C. Dennett, Look Out for the Dirty Baby.
    Back and forth swings the pendulum. It is remarkable that Baars can claim that “many scientists now feel that radical behaviorists tossed out the baby with the bathwater” while not being able to see that his own efforts threaten to be an instance of the complementary overshooting–what we might call covering a nice clean baby with dualistic dirt . Yes indeed, radical behaviorism of Skinner’s variety fell from grace some years ago, with the so-called cognitive revolution, to be replaced by (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Daniel C. Dennett, Memes: Myths, Misunderstandings and Misgivings.
    When one says that cultures evolve, this can be taken as a truism, or as asserting one or another controversial, speculative, unconfirmed theory. Consider a cultural inventory at time t: it includes all the languages, practices, ceremonies, edifices, methods, tools, myths, music, art, and so forth, that compose a culture. Over time, the inventory changes. Some items disappear, some multiply, some merge, some change. (When I say some change, I mean to be neutral at this point about whether this amounts (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Daniel C. Dennett, Producing Future by Telling Stories.
    Sometimes the way to make progress on a topic is to turn your back on it for a few years. At least I hope so, since I have just returned to the Frame Problem after several years of concentrating on other topics. It seems to me that I may have picked up a few odds and ends that shed light on the issues.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Daniel C. Dennett, Reply.
    (1) I am grateful for the information about von Schilcher and Tennant's book, which unaccountably had not crossed my path before. I am not the only author to have overlooked it, and a cursory reading shows that it does anticipate points in many more recent books, including my own. And Mulhauser is right that Sampson and Montague would have been valuable allies had I developed my critique of Chomsky further--but that is a tangential issue in an overlong book.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Daniel C. Dennett, Religion's Just a Survival Meme.
    In his critique of my recent book, Breaking the Spell, Alister McGrath is pounding on an open door. Yes, of course, scientific ideas are memes and atheism is a meme. That’s not the point. The point is not to criticize anything by calling it a meme. On the contrary, it is to provide an explanatory basis. So, of course, psychologist and memeticist Susan Blackmore was right to say that atheism is a meme.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Daniel C. Dennett, Review of Burkert for the Sciences. [REVIEW]
    All human groups, it seems, have had religion. There have been groups without agriculture, without clothing, without money, without the wheel, without laws, without writing, but not, it seems, without religion. Ritual burial of our hominid ancestors may even predate spoken..
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Daniel C. Dennett, Review of Hofstadter Et Al., Fluid Concepts and Creative Analogies. [REVIEW]
    In 1979, Douglas Hofstadter published Gödel Escher Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid , a brilliant exploration of some of the most difficult and fascinating ideas at the heart of cognitive science: recursion, computation, reduction, holism, meaning, "jootsing" (jumping out of the system), "strange loops", and much, much more. What made the book's expositions so effective were a family of elaborate (and lovingly elaborated) analogies: the mind is like an anthill, a formal system is like a game, theorem and nontheorem are (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Daniel C. Dennett, Review of Jackendoff/Pinker. [REVIEW]
    There was language long before there was writing, a fact that we literate investigators tend to underestimate. Today we are building the information superhighway, and for several millennia the written word has been the primary medium of cultural transmission, but for at least a thousand millennia before that, the main medium of information transfer from generation to generation--standing alongside the genome itself and the information embodied directly in artifacts--was the well-beaten path of word of mouth. Language was already a highly (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Daniel C. Dennett, Review of McGinn, The Problem of Consciousness. [REVIEW]
    In other words, it's a perfect season for naysayers, and philosophers have risen to the occasion. The most radical is Colin McGinn, former Wilde Reader of Mental Philosophy at Oxford, who has recently taken a position at Rutgers University in New Jersey. The Problem of Consciousness is a collection of eight essays, two of which have not previously been published. McGinn's central thesis is that the problem of consciousness is systematically insoluble by us (Martians or demigods might have better luck). (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Daniel C. Dennett, Review of Nagel, Other Minds. [REVIEW]
    The institution of book reviews, flawed though it may be, still performs a crucial service of resource enhancement for a discipline, funneling informed attention to at least some of the best among a superfluity of publications. During the last quarter century, Thomas Nagel's book reviews and critical essays have played a major role, shaping opinion, and thereby shaping the field. Now he has gathered his favorites in a collection, ten in philosophy of mind, and a dozen in ethics and political (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Daniel C. Dennett, Review of Newell, Unified Theories of Cognition. [REVIEW]
    The time for unification in cognitive science has arrived, but who should lead the charge? The immunologist-turned-neuroscientist Gerald Edelman (1989, 1992) thinks that neuroscientists should lead--or more precisely that he should (he seems to have a low opinion of everyone else in cognitive science). Someone might think that I had made a symmetrically opposite claim in Consciousness Explained (Dennett, 1991): philosophers (or more precisely, those that agree with me!) are in the best position to see how to tie all the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Daniel C. Dennett, Review of Papert, The Children's Machine. [REVIEW]
    In 1956, the mathematician John McCarthy coined the term "Artificial Intelligence" for a new discipline that was emerging from some of the more imaginative and playful explorations of the new mind-tool, the computer. A few years later he developed a radically new sort of programming language, Lisp, which became the lingua franca of AI. Unlike the sturdier, stodgier computer languages created by and for business and industry, Lisp was remarkably open-ended and freewheeling. Instead of concentrating on numbers, it was designed (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Daniel C. Dennett, Review of Varela, "Review of F. Varela, E. Thompson and E. Rosch, The Embodied Mind ," American Journal of Psychology, 106, 121-6, 1993. [REVIEW]
    Cognitive science, as an interdisciplinary school of thought, may have recently moved beyond the bandwagon stage onto the throne of orthodoxy, but it does not make a favorable first impression on many people. Familiar reactions on first encounters range from revulsion to condescending dismissal--very few faces in the crowd light up with the sense of "Aha! So that's how the mind works! Of course!" Cognitive science leaves something out , it seems; moreover, what it apparently leaves out is important, even (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Daniel C. Dennett, Response to Fodor on DDI.
    I've been looking forward to seeing Jerry Fodor's reaction to my book, since his candidly avowed antipathy toward evolutionary arguments was one of the spurs for writing it. For instance, it was his brusque comment to me in 1985 to the effect that Searle was right about robots lacking original intentionality that set me to writing "Evolution, Error and Intentionality" (1987), and that contributed in turn to some of his recent outbursts against evolutionary approaches to these issues. Nothing clears the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Daniel C. Dennett, Reply to Orr.
    When Professor Orr published his hostile review of Darwin's Dangerous Idea in the biology journal, Evolution, last February, I was not pleased. His review was full of falsehoods and misconstruals, but I had no recourse; that journal, like most academic journals, does not permit authors to respond to reviews. Luckily for me, Orr has been so eager to warn the world of my errors that he has restated his attack, with embellishments, in the Boston Review, which has invited me to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Daniel C. Dennett, Show Me the Science.
    PRESIDENT BUSH, announcing this month that he was in favor of teaching about "intelligent design" in the schools, said, "I think that part of education is to expose people to different schools of thought." A couple of weeks later, Senator Bill Frist of Tennessee, the Republican leader, made the same point. Teaching both intelligent design and evolution "doesn't force any particular theory on anyone," Mr. Frist said. "I think in a pluralistic society that is the fairest way to go about (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Daniel C. Dennett, Two Contrasts.
    Let us begin with what all of us here agree on: folk psychology is not immune to revision. It has a certain vulnerability in principle. Any particular part of it might be overthrown and replaced by some other doctrine. Yet we disagree about how likely it is that that vulnerability in principle will turn into the actual demise of large portions--or all--of folk psychology. I am of the view that folk psychology is here for the long haul, and for some (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Daniel C. Dennett, Verbal Language..
    We human beings may not be the most admirable species on the planet, or the most likely to survive for another millennium, but we are without any doubt at all the most intelligent. We are also the only species with language. What is the relation between these two obvious facts?
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Daniel C. Dennett, When Philosophers Encounter AI.
    How is it possible for a physical thing--a person, an animal, a robot--to extract knowledge of the world from perception and then exploit that knowledge in the guidance of successful action? That is a question with which philosophers have grappled for generations, but it could also be taken to be one of the defining questions of Artificial Intelligence. AI is, in large measure, philosophy. It is often directly concerned with instantly recognizable philosophical questions: What is mind? What is meaning? What (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Richard Griffin & Daniel C. Dennett, What Does the Study of Autism Tell Us About the Craft of Folk Psychology?
    Autism is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by difficulties in social interaction (APA, 2000). Successful social interaction relies, in part, on determining the thoughts and feelings of others, an ability commonly attributed to our faculty of folk or common-sense psychology. Because the symptoms of autism should be present by around the second birthday, it follows that the study of autism should tell us something about the early emerging mechanisms necessary for the development of an intact faculty of folk psychology. Our aims (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Daniel C. Dennett (forthcoming). Artifactual Selves: A Response to Lynne Rudder Baker. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-4.
    Baker’s critique of my view of the self as a fiction captures some of its points well but misses the possibility of a theorist’s fiction, like the Equator or a center of gravity, which is not an illusion, but rather an abstraction, like dollars, poems, and software—made of no material but dependent on material vehicles. It is an artifact of our everyday effort to make sense of our own (and others’) complex activities by postulating a single central source of meaning, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Daniel C. Dennett (2013). Bestiary of the Manifest Image. In Don Ross, James Ladyman & Harold Kincaid (eds.), Scientific Metaphysics. Oxford University Press. 96.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 299