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  1. James Bartlett, Amy L. Boggan & Daniel C. Krawczyk (2013). Expertise and Processing Distorted Structure in Chess. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:825.
    A classic finding in research on human expertise and knowledge is that of enhanced memory for stimuli in a domain of expertise as compared to either stimuli outside that domain, or within-domain stimuli that have been or degraded or distorted in some way. However, we do not understand how the expert brain processes within-domain stimuli that have been distorted enough to be perceived as impossible or wrong, and yet still are perceived as within the domain (e.g., a face with the (...)
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  2. Daniel C. Krawczyk, Gerri Hanten, Elisabeth A. Wilde, Xiaoqi Li, Kathleen P. Schnelle, Tricia L. Merkley, Ana C. Vasquez, Lori G. Cook, Michelle McClelland, Sandra B. Chapman & Harvey S. Levin (2010). Deficits in Analogical Reasoning in Adolescents with Traumatic Brain Injury. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.
    Individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) exhibit deficits in executive control, which may impact their reasoning abilities. Analogical reasoning requires working memory and inhibitory abilities. In this study, we tested adolescents with moderate to severe TBI and typically-developing (TD) controls on a set of picture analogy problems. Three factors were varied: complexity (number of relations in the problems), distraction (distractor item present or absent), and animacy (living or non-living items in the problems). We found that TD adolescents performed significantly better (...)
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  3. Daniel C. Krawczyk, Keith J. Holyoak & John E. Hummel (2005). The One‐to‐One Constraint in Analogical Mapping and Inference. Cognitive Science 29 (5):797-806.
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  4. Daniel C. Krawczyk, Keith J. Holyoak & John E. Hummel (2004). Structural Constraints and Object Similarity in Analogical Mapping and Inference. Thinking and Reasoning 10 (1):85 – 104.
    Theories of analogical reasoning have viewed relational structure as the dominant determinant of analogical mapping and inference, while assigning lesser importance to similarity between individual objects. An experiment is reported in which these two sources of constraints on analogy are placed in competition under conditions of high relational complexity. Results demonstrate equal importance for relational structure and object similarity, both in analogical mapping and in inference generation. The human data were successfully simulated using a computational analogy model (LISA) that treats (...)
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