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Profile: Daniel Groll (Carleton College)
  1. Daniel Groll (2012). Paternalism, Respect, and the Will. Ethics 122 (4):692-720.
    In general, we think that when it comes to the good of another, we respect that person’s will by acting in accordance with what he wills because he wills it. I argue that this is not necessarily true. When it comes to the good of another person, it is possible to disrespect that person’s will while acting in accordance with what he wills because he wills it. Seeing how this is so, I argue, enables us to clarify the distinct roles (...)
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  2. Daniel Groll & Micah Lott (2015). Is There a Role for ‘Human Nature’ in Debates About Human Enhancement? Philosophy 90 (4):623-651.
    In discussions about the ethics of enhancement, it is often claimed that the concept of ‘human nature’ has no helpful role to play. There are two ideas behind this thought. The first is that nature, human nature included, is a mixed bag. Some parts of our nature are good for us and some are bad for us. The ‘mixed bag’ idea leads naturally to the second idea, namely that the fact that something is part of our nature is, by itself, (...)
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  3. Jason Decker & Daniel Groll (2013). The (In)Significance of Moral Disagreement for Moral Knowledge. In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics, Volume 8. Oxford
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  4. Daniel Groll (2013). Autonomy (The Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Utilitarianism). In James Crimmins (ed.), The Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Utilitarianism. Bloomsbury
  5. Daniel Groll (2011). What You Don't Know Can Help You: The Ethics of Placebo Treatment. Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (2):188-202.
  6. Daniel Groll (2011). What Health Care Providers Know: A Taxonomy of Clinical Disagreements. Hastings Center Report 41 (5):27-36.
    When, if ever, can healthcare provider's lay claim to knowing what is best for their patients? In this paper, I offer a taxonomy of clinical disagreements. The taxonomy, I argue, reveals that healthcare providers often can lay claim to knowing what is best for their patients, but that oftentimes, they cannot do so *as* healthcare providers.
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  7.  44
    Daniel Groll (2015). Medicine & Well-Being. In Guy Fletcher (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Well-Being. Routledge
    The connections between medicine and well-being are myriad. This paper focuses on the place of well-being in clinical medicine. It is here that different views of well-being, and their connection to concepts like “autonomy” and “authenticity”, both illuminate and are illuminated by looking closely at the kinds of interactions that routinely take place between clinicians, patients, and family members. -/- In the first part of the paper, I explore the place of well-being in a paradigmatic clinical encounter, one where a (...)
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  8. Daniel Groll & Jason Decker (2014). Moral Testimony: One of These Things Is Just Like the Others. Analytic Philosophy 54 (4):54-74.
    What, if anything, is wrong with acquiring moral beliefs on the basis of testimony? Most philosophers think that there is something wrong with it, and most point to a special problem that moral testimony is supposed to create for moral agency. Being a good moral agent involves more than bringing about the right outcomes. It also involves acting with "moral understanding" and one cannot have moral understanding of what one is doing via moral testimony. And so, adherents to this view (...)
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  9.  40
    Daniel Groll (2014). Medical Paternalism - Part 1. Philosophy Compass 9 (3):194-203.
    Medical clinicians – doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners etc. – are charged to act for the good of their patients. But not all ways of acting for a patient's good are on par: some are paternalistic; others are not. What does it mean to act paternalistically, both in general and specifically in a medical context? And when, if ever, is it permissible for a clinician to act paternalistically? -/- This paper deals with the first question, with a special focus on paternalism (...)
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  10.  23
    Daniel Groll (2014). Medical Paternalism – Part 2. Philosophy Compass 9 (3):194-203.
    Medical clinicians – doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners etc. – are charged to act for the good of their patients. But not all ways of acting for a patient's good are on par: some are paternalistic; others are not. What does it mean to act paternalistically, both in general and specifically in a medical context? And when, if ever, is it permissible for a clinician to act paternalistically? In Medical Paternalism Part 1, I answered the first question. This paper answers the (...)
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  11.  43
    Daniel Groll (2010). Review of Jeffrey A. Schaler (Ed.), Peter Singer Under Fire: The Moral Iconoclast Faces His Critics. [REVIEW] Teaching Philosophy 33 (4):418-421.
  12.  10
    Daniel Groll (2014). Four Models of Family Interests. Pedatrics 134:S81-S86.
    In this article, I distinguish between 4 models for thinking about how to balance the interests of parents, families, and a sick child: (1) the oxygen mask model; (2) the wide interests model; (3) the family interests model; and (4) the direct model. The oxygen mask model – which takes its name from flight attendants' directives to parents to put on their own oxygen mask before putting on their child's – says that parents should consider their own interests only insofar (...)
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  13.  10
    Daniel Groll (2009). Review of James D. Wallace, Norms and Practices. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (9).
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  14. Daniel Groll (2012). Authority Figures Reply. Hastings Center Report 42 (3):6-7.
     
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