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  1. Ken Knisely, Verna Gehring, Daniel Kolak & Bruce Umbaugh (forthcoming). The Conscious Mind: No Dogs or Philosophers Allowed. DVD.
    Are we on the threshold of the final explanations of consciousness and self-consciousness? Is there a relationship between the insights of quantum theory and the conscious mind? With Verna Gehring, Daniel Kolak, and Bruce Umbaugh.
     
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  2. Daniel Kolak (2008). Room for a View: On the Metaphysical Subject of Personal Identity. Synthese 162 (3):341 - 372.
    Sydney Shoemaker leads today’s “neo-Lockean” liberation of persons from the conservative animalist charge of “neo-Aristotelians” such as Eric Olson, according to whom persons are biological entities and who challenge all neo-Lockean views on grounds that abstracting from strictly physical, or bodily, criteria plays fast and loose with our identities. There is a fundamental mistake on both sides: a false dichotomy between bodily continuity versus psychological continuity theories of personal identity. Neo-Lockeans, like everyone else today who relies on Locke’s analysis of (...)
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  3. Daniel Kolak (2008). Stepping Into the Same Rivers: Consciousness, Personal Identity and the Metaphysical Foundations for Global Ethics. In Jure Zovko & John Dillon (eds.), Platonism and Forms of Intelligence. Akademie Verlag. 117-138.
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  4. Daniel Kolak, William Hirstein, Peter Mandik & Jonathan Waskan (2006). Cognitive Science: An Introduction to Mind and Brain. Routledge.
    Cognitive Science is a major new guide to the central theories and problems in the study of the mind and brain. The authors clearly explain how and why cognitive science aims to understand the brain as a computational system that manipulates representations. They identify the roots of cognitive science in Descartes - who argued that all knowledge of the external world is filtered through some sort of representation - and examine the present-day role of Artificial Intelligence, computing, psychology, linguistics and (...)
     
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  5. Daniel Kolak & Raymond Martin (eds.) (2006). The Experience of Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    This exceptional anthology immerses students in such powerful ideas that they will find themselves not just reading about, but actually participating in, the kind of philosophical thinking that can change the way they look at their lives and the world around them. Now in a new edition, The Experience of Philosophy features eighty-five readings that challenge students' thinking about God, freedom, reality, nothingness, death, and their own identities. Provocative and accessible, these selections have been carefully chosen for their ability to (...)
     
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  6. Daniel Kolak & John Symons (2004). The Results Are In: The Scope and Import of Hintikka's Philosophy. In D. Kolak & J. Symons (eds.), Quantifiers, Questions and Quantum Physics. Springer. 209--271.
  7. Matti Eklund & Daniel Kolak (2002). Is Hintikka's Logic First-Order? Synthese 131 (3):371 - 388.
    Jaakko Hintikka has argued that ordinary first-order logic should be replaced byindependence-friendly first-order logic, where essentially branching quantificationcan be represented. One recurring criticism of Hintikka has been that Hintikka''ssupposedly new logic is equivalent to a system of second-order logic, and henceis neither novel nor first-order. A standard reply to this criticism by Hintikka andhis defenders has been to show that given game-theoretic semantics, Hintikka''sbranching quantifiers receive the exact same treatment as the regular first-orderones. We develop a different reply, based around (...)
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  8. Ken Knisely, Daniel Kolak & Bruce Umbaugh (2002). The Conscious Mind: Dvd. Milk Bottle Productions.
    Are we on the threshold of the final explanations of consciousness and self-consciousness? Is there a relationship between the insights of quantum theory and the conscious mind? With Verna Gehring, Daniel Kolak, and Bruce Umbaugh.
     
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  9. Daniel Kolak (1999). In Search of Myself Life, Death, and Personal Identity. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  10. Daniel Kolak & Raymond Martin (1999). Wisdom Without Answers a Brief Introduction to Philosophy. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  11. Ludwig Wittgenstein & Daniel Kolak (1998). Wittgenstein's Tractatus.
     
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  12. Daniel Kolak (1997). Lovers of Wisdom a Historical Introduction to Philosophy with Integrated Readings. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  13. Daniel Kolak (ed.) (1994). From Plato to Wittgenstein: The Historical Foundations of Mind. Wadsworth Pub. Co..
  14. Daniel Kolak (1993). Finding Our Selves: Identification, Identity, and Multiple Personality. Philosophical Psychology 6 (4):363-86.
    Many of the differences between empirical/psychological and conceptual/philosophical approaches to the mind can be resolved using a more precise language that is sensitive to both. Distinguishing identification from identity and identification as from identification with, and then defining the experiential concept of the per sonat, provides a walking bridge. Applying the new terminology to increasing degrees of dissociation, from non-pathological cases to multiple personality, shows how our psychologies can profit from philosophical analysis while our philosophies can revise themselves according to (...)
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  15. Daniel Kolak (1993). The Metaphysics and Metapsychology of Personal Identity: Why Thought Experiments Matter in Deciding Who We Are. American Philosophical Quarterly 30 (1):39-50.
    What are the metaphysical and metapsychological boundaries of a person? How do we draw our borders? This much is clear: personal identity without thought experiments is impossible. I develop a new way of conceptualizing physiological and psychological borders leading to a re-evaluation of the problem of personal identity within the contemporary literature, especially Parfit, arguing that we must, necessarily, turn to the conceptual analysis of metaphysical and metapsychological borders. I offer an explanation of the persistence of common sense against philosophical (...)
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  16. Daniel Kolak & Raymond Martin (eds.) (1992). The Experience of Philosophy (Second Edition). Belmont: Wadsworth.
    This exceptional anthology immerses students in such powerful ideas that they will find themselves not just reading about, but actually participating in, the kind of philosophical thinking that can change the way they look at their lives and the world around them. Now in a new edition, The Experience of Philosophy features eighty-five readings that challenge students' thinking about God, freedom, reality, nothingness, death, and their own identities. Provocative and accessible, these selections have been carefully chosen for their ability to (...)
     
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  17. Daniel Kolak & R. Martin (eds.) (1991). Self and Identity: Contemporary Philosophical Issues. Macmillan.
     
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  18. Daniel Kolak (1990). Art and Intentionality. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 48 (2):158-162.
  19. Daniel Kolak & Raymond Martin (1989). Wisdom Without Answers a Guide to the Experience of Philosophy. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  20. Daniel Kolak & R. Martin (1987). Personal Identity and Causality: Becoming Unglued. American Philosophical Quarterly 24 (October):339-347.
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  21. Daniel Kolak (1986). I Am You: A Philosophical Explanation of the Possibility That We Are All the Same Person. Dissertation, University of Maryland, College Park
    I show why all current theories of personal identity, including the relativist/dissolutionist alternatives proposed recently by Robert Nozick and Derek Parfit, are subject to criticisms that collectively point in the direction of the thesis that there exists only one person in the universe. By my analysis, we are each a different human being. But the barriers between human beings--such as our each having a different physical body, different memories, a different stream of consciousness, different spatiotemporal positions, and so on--are not (...)
     
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