10 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Daniel Lim [9]Daniel F. Lim [1]
See also:
Profile: Daniel Lim (Renmin University)
  1. Daniel Lim (2014). Brain Simulation and Personhood: A Concern with the Human Brain Project. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 16 (2):77-89.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Daniel Lim (2014). Can a Dualist Adopt Bennett's Strategy? Philosophical Forum 45 (3):251-271.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Daniel Lim (2014). Occasionalism and Non-Reductive Physicalism: Another Look at the Continuous Creation Argument. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 75 (1):39-57.
    Malebranche’s so-called conservation is continuous creation (CCC) argument has been celebrated as a powerful and persuasive argument for Occasionalism—the claim that only God has and exercises causal powers. In this paper I want to examine the CCC argument for Occasionalism by comparing it to Jaegwon Kim’s so-called Supervenience argument against non-reductive physicalism. Because the arguments have deep similarities it is interesting and fruitful to consider them in tandem. First I argue that both the CCC argument and the Supervenience argument turn (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Daniel Lim & Hao Wang (2014). Can Mary's Qualia Be Epiphenomenal? Res Philosophica 91 (3):503-512.
    Frank Jackson (1982) famously argued, with his so-called Knowledge Argument (KA), that qualia are non-physical. Moreover, he argued that qualia are epiphenomenal. Some have objected that epiphenomenalism is inconsistent with the soundness of KA. One way of developing this objection, following Neil Campbell (2003; 2012), is to argue that epiphenomenalism is at odds with the kind of behavioral evidence that makes the soundness of KA plausible. We argue that Campbell’s claim that epiphenomenalism is inconsistent with the soundness of KA is (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Daniel Lim (2013). Why Not Overdetermination? Heythrop Journal 54 (2):668-677.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Daniel F. Lim (2013). Causal Exclusion and Overdetermination. International Philosophical Quarterly 53 (4):353-369.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Daniel Lim (2011). Exclusion, Overdetermination, and Vacuity. Southwest Philosophy Review 27 (1):57-64.
    Jaegwon Kim argues that if mental properties are irreducible with respect to physical properties then mental properties are epiphenomenal. I believe this conditional is false and argue that mental properties, along with their physical counterparts, may overdetermine their effects. Kim contends, however, that embracing overdetermination in the mental case, due to supervenience, renders the attribution of overdetermination vacuous. This way of blocking the overdetermination option, however, makes the attribution of mental epiphenomenalism equally vacuous. Furthermore, according to Kim’s own logic, physical (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Daniel Lim (2011). Zombies, Epiphenomenalism, and Personal Explanations: A Tension in Moreland's Argument From Consciousness. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 3 (2):439 - 450.
    In his so-called argument from consciousness (AC), J. P. Moreland argues that the phenomenon of consciousness furnishes us with evidence for the existence of God. In defending AC, however, Moreland makes claims that generate an undesirable tension. This tension can be posed as a dilemma based on the contingency of the correlation between mental and physical states. The correlation of mental and physical states is either contingent or necessary. If the correlation is contingent then epiphenomenalism is true. If the correlation (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Daniel Lim (2009). Neuroscience and Philosophy: Brain, Mind, and Language. By Maxwell Bennett, Daniel Dennett, Peter Hacker, and John Searle. Zygon 44 (4):1003-1005.
  10. Daniel Lim (2008). Did My Neurons Make Me Do It? Philosophical and Neurobiological Perspectives on Moral Responsibility and Free Will. By Nancey Murphy and Warren S. Brown. Zygon 43 (3):748-753.