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Daniel M. Hausman [98]Daniel Murray Hausman [1]
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Profile: Daniel Hausman (University of Wisconsin, Madison)
  1. Daniel M. Hausman, Economics, Philosophy Of.
    People have thought about economics for as long as they have thought about how to manage their households, and indeed Aristotle assimilated the study of the economic affairs of a city to the study of the management of a household. During the two millennia between Aristotle and Adam Smith, one finds reflections concerning economic problems mainly in the context of discussions of moral or policy questions. For example, scholastic philosophers commented on money and interest in inquiries concerning the justice of (...)
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  2. Daniel M. Hausman, Trust in Game Theory.
    No doubt men are capable even now of much more unselfish service than they generally render; and the supreme aim of the economist is to discover how this latent social asset can be developed more quickly and turned to account more wisely. (Alfred Marshall, Principles of Economics , p. 8).
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  3. Daniel M. Hausman, Why Not Just Ask? Preferences, “Empirical Ethics” and the Role of Ethical Reflection.
    Many questions concerning health involve values. How well is a health system performing? How should resources be allocated between the health system and other uses or among competing healthrelated uses? How should the costs of health services be distributed among members of a population? Who among those in need of transplants should receive scarce organs? What is the best way to treat particular patients? Although many kinds of expertise bear on these questions, values play a large role in answering them. (...)
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  4. Daniel M. Hausman (forthcoming). Explanatory Progress in Economics. Social Research.
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  5. Daniel M. Hausman (2014). Health and Functional Efficiency. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (6):634-647.
    This essay argues that what is central to Christopher Boorse’s biostatistical theory of disease as statistically subnormal part function (BST) are comparisons of the “functional efficiency” of parts and processes and that statistical considerations serve only to pick out a healthy level of functional efficiency. On this interpretation, the distinction between health and pathology is less important than comparisons of functional efficiency, which are entirely independent of statistical considerations. The clarifications or revisions of the BST that this essay offers are (...)
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  6. Daniel M. Hausman, Reuben Stern & Naftali Weinberger (2014). Systems Without a Graphical Causal Representation. Synthese 191 (8):1925-1930.
    There are simple mechanical systems that elude causal representation. We describe one that cannot be represented in a single directed acyclic graph. Our case suggests limitations on the use of causal graphs for causal inference and makes salient the point that causal relations among variables depend upon details of causal setups, including values of variables.
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  7. Daniel M. Hausman (2013). A Reply to Lehtinen, Teschl and Pattanaik. Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (2):219-223.
  8. Daniel M. Hausman (2013). Paradox Postponed. Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (3):250 - 254.
    This comment argues that there is an explanation paradox in economics, as Julian Reiss maintains, only if models in economics succeed in explaining even though they are not approximately true, fail to identify the causes of what they purport to explain, and misdescribe the mechanism by which the causes lead to the effects to be explained. Reiss provides no reason to believe that models that do not describe the causes and mechanisms at work are nevertheless explanatory.
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  9. Daniel M. Hausman (2012). Evaluating Social Policy. In Harold Kincaid (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Social Science. Oxford University Press.
  10. Daniel M. Hausman (2012). Health, Naturalism, and Functional Efficiency. Philosophy of Science 79 (4):519-541.
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  11. Daniel M. Hausman (2012). Social Scientific Naturalism and Experimentation in Economics. In Uskali Mäki, Dov M. Gabbay, Paul Thagard & John Woods (eds.), Philosophy of Economics. North Holland. 287.
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  12. Daniel M. Hausman (2012). Well-Being and Fair Distribution: Beyond Cost-Benefit Analysis, Adler. Oxford University Press, 2012, 634 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 28 (3):435-443.
    Book Reviews Daniel M. Hausman, Economics and Philosophy , FirstView Article.
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  13. Daniel M. Hausman & Matt Sensat Waldren (2012). Egalitarianism Reconsidered. Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (4):567-586.
    This paper argues that egalitarian theories should be judged by the degree to which they meet four different challenges. Fundamentalist egalitarianism, which contends that certain inequalities are intrinsically bad or unjust regardless of their consequences, fails to meet these challenges. Building on discussions by T.M. Scanlon and David Miller, we argue that egalitarianism is better understood in terms of commitments to six egalitarian objectives. A consequence of our view, in contrast to Martin O'Neill's “non-intrinsic egalitarianism,“ is that egalitarianism is better (...)
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  14. Daniel M. Hausman (2011). A Lockean Argument for Universal Access to Health Care. Social Philosophy and Policy 28 (2):166-191.
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  15. Daniel M. Hausman (2011). Health, Luck, and Justice, Shlomi Segall. Princeton University Press, 2010. X + 239 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 27 (2):190-198.
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  16. Daniel M. Hausman (2010). Hedonism and Welfare Economics. Economics and Philosophy 26 (03):321-344.
    This essay criticizes the proposal recently defended by a number of prominent economists that welfare economics be redirected away from the satisfaction of people's preferences and toward making people happy instead. Although information about happiness may sometimes be of use, the notion of happiness is sufficiently ambiguous and the objections to identifying welfare with happiness are sufficiently serious that welfare economists are better off using preference satisfaction as a measure of welfare. The essay also examines and criticizes the position associated (...)
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  17. Daniel M. Hausman (2010). Probabilistic Causality and Causal Generalizations. In Ellery Eells & James H. Fetzer (eds.), The Place of Probability in Science. Springer. 47--63.
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  18. Daniel M. Hausman (2010). Philosophy of the Behavioral and Social Sciences: Philosophy of the Cognitive Sciences / William Bechtel and Mitchell Herschbach. Philosophy of Psychology / Edouard Machery. Philosophy of Sociology / Daniel Little. Philosophy of Economics. [REVIEW] In Fritz Allhoff (ed.), Philosophies of the Sciences. Wiley-Blackwell.
  19. Daniel M. Hausman & Brynn Welch (2010). Debate: To Nudge or Not to Nudge. Journal of Political Philosophy 18 (1):123-136.
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  20. Cheshire Calhoun, Mark LeBar, Matthew S. Bedke, Seth Lazar, Neil Levy & Daniel M. Hausman (2009). 10. Iakovos Vasiliou, Aiming at Virtue in Plato Iakovos Vasiliou, Aiming at Virtue in Plato (Pp. 796-800). In John Hawthorne (ed.), Ethics. Wiley Periodicals, Inc..
     
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  21. Daniel M. Hausman (2009). Benevolence, Justice, Well-Being and the Health Gradient. Public Health Ethics 2 (3):235-243.
    The health gradient among those who are by historical standards both remarkably healthy and well-off is of considerable moral importance with respect to benevolence, justice and the theory of welfare. Indeed it may help us to realize that for most people the good life lies in close and intricate social ties with others which can flourish only when inequalities are limited. The health gradient suggests that there is a story to be told in which egalitarian justice, solidarity, health and well-being (...)
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  22. Daniel M. Hausman (2009). Equality of Autonomy. Ethics 119 (4):742-756.
  23. Daniel M. Hausman (2009). Review of C. L. Ten (Ed.), Mill's on Liberty: A Critical Guide. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (6).
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  24. Daniel M. Hausman & Michael S. McPherson (2009). Preference Satisfaction and Welfare Economics. Economics and Philosophy 25 (1):1-25.
    The tenuous claims of cost-benefit analysis to guide policy so as to promote welfare turn on measuring welfare by preference satisfaction and taking willingness-to-pay to indicate preferences. Yet it is obvious that people's preferences are not always self-interested and that false beliefs may lead people to prefer what is worse for them even when people are self-interested. So welfare is not preference satisfaction, and hence it appears that cost-benefit analysis and welfare economics in general rely on a mistaken theory of (...)
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  25. Daniel M. Hausman (2008). Fairness and Social Norms. Philosophy of Science 75 (5):850-860.
    This essay comments on the theory of social norms developed by Cristina Bicchieri in The Grammar of Society ( 2006 ). It applauds her theory of norms but argues that it cannot account for the experimental results concerning ultimatum games. A theory of fairness is also needed. It develops a number of specific criticisms of her way of incorporating the influence of norms into preferences. †To contact the author, please write to: Department of Philosophy, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 5197 Helen C. (...)
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  26. Daniel M. Hausman, Philosophy of Economics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This is a comprehensive anthology of works concerning the nature of economics as a science, including classic texts and essays exploring specific branches and schools of economics. Apart from the classics, most of the selections in the third edition are new, as are the introduction and bibliography. No other anthology spans the whole field and offers a comprehensive introduction to questions about economic methodology.
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  27. Daniel M. Hausman (ed.) (2008). The Philosophy of Economics: An Anthology. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a comprehensive anthology of works concerning the nature of economics as a science, including classic texts and essays exploring specific branches and schools of economics. Apart from the classics, most of the selections in the third edition are new, as are the introduction and bibliography. No other anthology spans the whole field and offers a comprehensive introduction to questions about economic methodology.
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  28. Daniel M. Hausman (2007). And Preference. In Fabienne Peter (ed.), Rationality and Commitment. Oxford University Press, Usa. 49.
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  29. Daniel M. Hausman (2007). Group Risks, Risks to Groups, and Group Engagement in Genetics Research. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (4):351-369.
    : This essay distinguishes between two kinds of group harms: harms to individuals in virtue of their membership in groups and harms to "structured" groups that have a continuing existence, an organization, and interests of their own. Genetic research creates risks of causing both kinds of group harms, and engagement with the groups at risk can help to mitigate those harms. The two kinds of group harms call for different kinds of group engagement.
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  30. Daniel M. Hausman (2007). What's Wrong with Health Inequalities? Journal of Political Philosophy 15 (1):46–66.
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  31. Daniel M. Hausman (2006). Russell Hardin, Indeterminacy and Society:Indeterminacy and Society. Ethics 116 (2):425-428.
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  32. Daniel M. Hausman (2006). Economic Analysis, Moral Philosophy, and Public Policy. Cambridge University Press.
    This book shows through accessible argument and numerous examples how understanding moral philosophy can improve economic analysis, how moral philosophy can benefit from economists' analytical tools, and how economic analysis and moral philosophy together can inform public policy. Part I explores rationality and its connections to morality. It argues that in defending their model of rationality, mainstream economists implicitly espouse contestable moral principles. Part II concerns welfare, utilitarianism and standard welfare economics, while Part III considers important moral notions that are (...)
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  33. Daniel M. Hausman (2006). Valuing Health. Philosophy and Public Affairs 34 (3):246–274.
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  34. Daniel M. Hausman (2005). Review of Mark Sagoff, Price, Principle, and the Environment. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (2).
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  35. Daniel M. Hausman (2005). Sympathy, Commitment, and Preference. Economics and Philosophy 21 (1):33-50.
    While very much in Sen's camp in rejecting revealed preference theory and emphasizing the complexity, incompleteness, and context dependence of preference and the intellectual costs of supposing that all the factors influencing choice can be captured by a single notion of preference, this essay contests his view that economists should recognize multiple notions of preference. It argues that Sen's concerns are better served by embracing a single conception of preference and insisting on the need for analysis of the multiple factors (...)
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  36. Daniel M. Hausman (2005). 'Testing' Game Theory. Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (2):211-223.
    This paper considers whether game theory can be tested, what difficulties experimenters face in testing it, and what can be learned from attempts to test it. I emphasize that tests of game theory rely on fallible assumptions concerning particular features of the strategic situation and of the players. These do not render game theory untestable in principle, but they create serious problems. In coping with these problems, experimenters may use game theory to learn what games experimental subjects are playing.
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  37. Daniel Murray Hausman (2005). Causal Relata: Tokens, Types, or Variables? [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 63 (1):33 - 54.
    The literature on causation distinguishes between causal claims relating properties or types and causal claims relating individuals or tokens. Many authors maintain that corresponding to these two kinds of causal claims are two different kinds of causal relations. Whether to regard causal relations among variables as yet another variety of causation is also controversial. This essay maintains that causal relations obtain among tokens and that type causal claims are generalizations concerning causal relations among these tokens.
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  38. Daniel M. Hausman (2004). Polling and Public Policy. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (3):241-247.
    : This commentary distinguishes five reasons why one might want to conduct a survey concerning people's beliefs about death and the permissibility of harvesting organs: (1) simply to learn what people know and want; (2) to determine if current law and practice conform to the wishes of the population; (3) to determine the level of popular support for or opposition to policy changes; (4) to ascertain the causes and effects of popular beliefs and attitudes; and (5) to provide guidance in (...)
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  39. Daniel M. Hausman (2004). Trust and Trustworthiness, by Russell Hardin. Russell Sage Foundation, 2002, XXI + 234 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 20 (1):240-246.
  40. Daniel M. Hausman & James Woodward (2004). Modularity and the Causal Markov Condition: A Restatement. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (1):147-161.
    expose some gaps and difficulties in the argument for the causal Markov condition in our essay ‘Independence, Invariance and the Causal Markov Condition’ ([1999]), and we are grateful for the opportunity to reformulate our position. In particular, Cartwright disagrees vigorously with many of the theses we advance about the connection between causation and manipulation. Although we are not persuaded by some of her criticisms, we shall confine ourselves to showing how our central argument can be reconstructed and to casting doubt (...)
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  41. Daniel M. Hausman (2003). Philip Kitcher, Science, Truth, and Democracy:Science, Truth, and Democracy. Ethics 113 (2):423-428.
  42. Daniel M. Hausman (2003). Critical Studies / Book Reviews. Philosophia Mathematica 11 (3):354-358.
  43. Daniel M. Hausman (2003). Rational Belief and Social Interaction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):163-164.
    Game theory poses problems for modeling rational belief, but it does not need a new theory of rationality. Experimental results that suggest otherwise often reveal difficulties in testing game theory, rather than mistakes or paradoxes. Even though the puzzles Colman discusses show no inadequacy in the standard theory of rationality, they show that improved models of belief are needed.
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  44. Daniel M. Hausman (2002). Physical Causation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 33 (4):717-724.
  45. Daniel M. Hausman (2002). Physical Causation: Phil Dowe, Physical Causation (Cambridge Studies in Probability, Induction, and Decision Theory), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2000, Pp. Ix+ 224, Price US $60.00, ISBN: 0-521-78049-7 Hbk. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 33 (4):717-724.
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  46. Daniel M. Hausman, Yukiko Asada & Thomas Hedemann (2002). Health Inequalities and Why They Matter. Health Care Analysis 10 (2):177-191.
    Health inequalities are of concern both becausestudying them may help one learn how to improvehealth and because health inequalities may beunjust. This paper argues that attending tothese reasons why health inequalities may beimportant undercuts the claims of researchersat the World Health Organization in favor offocusing on individual health variation ratherthan on social group health differences. Inequalities in individual health are of littleinterest unless one goes on to study how theyare related to other factors.
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  47. Daniel M. Hausman (2001). A New Era for Economic Methodology. Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (1):65-68.
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  48. Daniel M. Hausman (2001). 15 Tendencies, Laws, and the Composition of Economic Causes. In Uskali Mäki (ed.), The Economic World View: Studies in the Ontology of Economics. Cambridge University Press. 293.
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  49. Daniel M. Hausman (2000). Cost-Value Analysis in Health Care: Making Sense Out of QALYs, Erik Nord. Cambridge University Press, 1999, 157 + XXIII Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 16 (2):333-378.
  50. Daniel M. Hausman (2000). Realist Philosophy and Methodology of Economics: What is It? Journal of Economic Methodology 7 (1):127-133.
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