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  1. Jason A. Clark & Daniel M. T. Fessler (forthcoming). The Role of Disgust in Norms, and of Norms in Disgust Research: Why Liberals Shouldn't Be Morally Disgusted by Moral Disgust. Topoi:1-16.
    Recently, many critics have argued that disgust is a morally harmful emotion, and that it should play no role in our moral and legal reasoning. Here we defend disgust as a morally beneficial moral capacity. We believe that a variety of liberal norms have been inappropriately imported into both moral psychology and ethical studies of disgust: disgust has been associated with conservative authors, values, value systems, and modes of moral reasoning that are seen as inferior to the values and moral (...)
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  2. Daniel M. T. Fessler (forthcoming). Professor. In Richard Joyce, Kim Sterelny & Brett Calcott (eds.), Signaling, Commitment, and Emotion. MIT Press.
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  3. Daniel M. T. Fessler & Katinka J. P. Quintelier (2013). Suicide Bombings, Weddings, and Prison Tattoos: An Evolutionary Perspective on Subjective Commitment and Objective Commitment. In Kim Sterelny, Richard Joyce, Brett Calcott & Ben Fraser (eds.), Cooperation and its Evolution. MIT Press.
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  4. Katinka J. P. Quintelier, Daniel M. T. Fessler & Delphine De Smet (2012). The Case of the Drunken Sailor: On the Generalisable Wrongness of Harmful Transgressions. Thinking and Reasoning 18 (2):183 - 195.
    There is a widespread conviction that people distinguish two kinds of acts: on the one hand, acts that are generalisably wrong because they go against universal principles of harm, justice, or rights; on the other hand, acts that are variably right or wrong depending on the social context. In this paper we criticise existing methods that measure generalisability. We report new findings indicating that a modification of generalisability measures is in order. We discuss our findings in light of recent criticisms (...)
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  5. Katinka J. P. Quintelier & Daniel M. T. Fessler (2011). Naturalizing the Normative and the Bridges Between “is” and “Ought”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (5):266.
    Elqayam & Evans (E&E) suggest descriptivism as a way to avoid fallacies and research biases. We argue, first, that descriptive and prescriptive theories might be better off with a closer interaction between and Moreover, while we acknowledge the problematic nature of the discussed fallacies and biases, important aspects of research would be lost through a broad application of descriptivism.
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  6. Katinka J. P. Quintelier & Daniel M. T. Fessler (2011). Naturalizing the Normative and the Bridges Between 'Is' and 'Ought&Quot;. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (5):266.
    Elqayam & Evans (E&E) suggest descriptivism as a way to avoid fallacies and research biases. We argue, first, that descriptive and prescriptive theories might be better off with a closer interaction between and Moreover, while we acknowledge the problematic nature of the discussed fallacies and biases, important aspects of research would be lost through a broad application of descriptivism.
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  7. Katinka Quintelier & Daniel M. T. Fessler, Harm, Authority and Generalizability: Further Experiments on the Moral/Conventional Distinction.
    Certain researchers in the field of moral psychology, following Turiel (1983), argue that children and adults in different cultures make a distinction between moral and conventional transgressions. One interpretation of the theory holds that moral transgressions elicit a signature moral response pattern while conventional transgressions elicit a signature conventional response pattern (e.g., Kelly et al. 2007). Four dimensions distinguish the moral response pattern from the conventional response pattern (e.g., Nichols 2004). 1. HARM/JUSTICE/RIGHTS – Subjects justify the wrongness of moral transgressions (...)
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  8. Stephen Stich, Daniel M. T. Fessler & Daniel Kelly (2009). On the Morality of Harm: A Response to Sousa, Holbrook and Piazza. Cognition 113 (1):93-97.
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  9. Daniel M. T. Fessler (2007). Neglected Natural Experiments Germane to the Westermarck Hypothesis. Human Nature 18 (4):355-364.
    Natural experiments wherein preferred marriage partners are co-reared play a central role in testing the Westermarck hypothesis. This paper reviews two such hitherto largely neglected experiments. The case of the Karo Batak is outlined in hopes that other scholars will procure additional information; the case of the Oneida community is examined in detail. Genealogical records reveal that, despite practicing communal child-rearing, marriages did take place within Oneida. However, when records are compared with first-person accounts, it becomes clear that, owing to (...)
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  10. Daniel Kelly, Stephen Stich, Kevin J. Haley, Serena J. Eng & Daniel M. T. Fessler (2007). Harm, Affect, and the Moral/Conventional Distinction. Mind and Language 22 (2):117–131.
  11. Daniel M. T. Fessler (2006). Contextual Features of Problem-Solving and Social Learning Give Rise to Spurious Associations, the Raw Materials for the Evolution of Rituals. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (6):617-618.
    If rituals persist in part because of their memory-taxing attributes, from whence do they arise? I suggest that magical practices form the core of rituals, and that many such practices derive from learned pseudo-causal associations. Spurious associations are likely to be acquired during problem-solving under conditions of ambiguity and danger, and are often a consequence of imitative social learning. (Published Online February 8 2007).
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  12. Daniel M. T. Fessler (2002). Starvation, Serotonin, and Symbolism. A Psychobiocultural Perspective on Stigmata. Mind and Society 3 (2):81-96.
    Stigmata, wounds resembling those of Christ, have been reported since the 13th century. The wounds typically appear in association with visions following prolonged fasting. This paper argues that self-starvation holds the key to understanding this unique event. Stigmata may result from self-mutilation occurring during dissociation, phenomena precipitated in part by dietary constriction. Psychophysiological mechanisms produced by natural selection adjust the salience of risk in light of current resource abundance. As a result, artificial dietary constriction results in indifference to harm. A (...)
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  13. Daniel M. T. Fessler (2002). Windfall and Socially Distributed Willpower: The Psychocultural Dynamics of Rotating Savings and Credit Associations in a Bengkulu Village. Ethos 30 (1‐2):25-48.
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