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Profile: Daniel Sulmasy (University of Chicago)
  1. Daniel P. Sulmasy (forthcoming). Health Care Justice and Hospice Care. Hastings Center Report.
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  2. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2014). Edmund Pellegrino's Philosophy and Ethics of Medicine: An Overview. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (2):105-112.
    Pellegrino was there at the beginning of the field. In the 1950s and 60s, before there was a Kennedy Institute of Ethics or a Hastings Center; before the word ‘bioethics’ itself was coined, Pellegrino was writing articles such as "Ethical Considerations in the Practice of Medicine and Nursing," published in 1964. He was among those who started the Society for Health and Human Values—a precursor organization to the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities. He was the founding editor of the (...)
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  3. Kevin E. Hodges & Daniel P. Sulmasy (2013). Moral Status, Justice, and the Common Morality: Challenges for the Principlist Account of Moral Change. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (3):275-296.
    The idea that ethics can be derived from a common morality, while controversial, has become very influential in biomedical ethics. Although the concept is employed by several theories, it has most prominently been given a central role in principlism, an ethical theory endorsed by Tom Beauchamp and James Childress in Principles of Biomedical Ethics (2009).1 This text has become a cornerstone of medical ethics education, an achievement that has been commended by critics and supporters alike. It articulates a system of (...)
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  4. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2013). The Varieties of Human Dignity: A Logical and Conceptual Analysis. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):937-944.
    The word ‘dignity’ is used in a variety of ways in bioethics, and this ambiguity has led some to argue that the term must be expunged from the bioethical lexicon. Such a judgment is far too hasty, however. In this article, the various uses of the word are classified into three serviceable categories: intrinsic, attributed, and inflorescent dignity. It is then demonstrated that, logically and linguistically, the attributed and inflorescent meanings of the word presuppose the intrinsic meaning. Thus, one cannot (...)
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  5. Lynn A. Jansen, Paul S. Appelbaum, William Mp Klein, Neil D. Weinstein, William Cook, Jessica S. Fogel & Daniel P. Sulmasy (2011). Unrealistic Optimism in Early-Phase Oncology Trials. Irb 33 (1):1.
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  6. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2011). Speaking of the Value of Life. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 21 (2):181-199.
    The notion of the value of life is often invoked in discussions regarding medical care for the sick and the dying. This theme has figured in arguments about medical ethics for decades, but many of the phrases associated with this concept have received little serious scrutiny. It is true that some philosophers have declared a few commonly used phrases such as “the sanctity of life,” “the infinite value of life,” and “the value of life itself” to be unclear at best (...)
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  7. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2009). Deliberative Democracy and Stem Cell Research in New York State: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (1):pp. 63-78.
    Many states in the U.S. have adopted policies regarding human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research in the last few years. Some have arrived at these policies through legislative debate, some by referendum, and some by executive order. New York has chosen a unique structure for addressing policy decisions regarding this morally controversial issue by creating the Empire State Stem Cell Board with two Committees—an Ethics Committee and a Funding Committee. This essay explores the pros and cons of various policy arrangements (...)
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  8. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2008). Dignity and Bioethics : History, Theory, and Selected Applications. In Adam Schulman (ed.), Human Dignity and Bioethics: Essays Commissioned by the President's Council on Bioethics. [President's Council on Bioethics.
     
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  9. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2008). What is Conscience and Why is Respect for It so Important? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (3):135-149.
    The literature on conscience in medicine has paid little attention to what is meant by the word ‘conscience.’ This article distinguishes between retrospective and prospective conscience, distinguishes synderesis from conscience, and argues against intuitionist views of conscience. Conscience is defined as having two interrelated parts: (1) a commitment to morality itself; to acting and choosing morally according to the best of one’s ability, and (2) the activity of judging that an act one has done or about which one is deliberating (...)
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  10. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2007). Reinventing” the Rule of Double Effect. In Bonnie Steinbock (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Bioethics. Oxford University Press. 114--49.
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  11. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2006). Emergency Contraception for Women Who Have Been Raped: Must Catholics Test for Ovulation, or is Testing for Pregnancy Morally Sufficient? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 16 (4):305-331.
    : On the grounds that rape is an act of violence, not a natural act of intercourse, Roman Catholic teaching traditionally has permitted women who have been raped to take steps to prevent pregnancy, while consistently prohibiting abortion even in the case of rape. Recent scientific evidence that emergency contraception (EC) works primarily by preventing ovulation, not by preventing implantation or by aborting implanted embryos, has led Church authorities to permit the use of EC drugs in the setting of rape. (...)
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  12. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2006). The Logos of the Genome: Genomes as Parts of Organisms. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (6):535-540.
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  13. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2005). “Diseases and Natural Kinds”. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (6):487-513.
    David Thomasma called for the development of a medical ethics based squarely on the philosophy of medicine. He recognized, however, that widespread anti-essentialism presented a significant barrier to such an approach. The aim of this article is to introduce a theory that challenges these anti-essentialist objections. The notion of natural kinds presents a modest form of essentialism that can serve as the basis for a foundationalist philosophy of medicine. The notion of a natural kind is neither static nor reductionistic. Disease (...)
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  14. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2005). Terri Schiavo and the Roman Catholic Tradition of Forgoing Extraordinary Means of Care. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):359-362.
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  15. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2004). Editorial: Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics Celebrates its 25th Birthday. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (1):1-2.
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  16. Lynn A. Jansen & Daniel P. Sulmasy (2003). Bioethics, Conflicts of Interest, the Limits of Transparency. Hastings Center Report 33 (4):40-43.
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  17. K. P. Weinfurt, Daniel P. Sulmasy, Kevin A. Schulman & Neal J. Meropol (2003). Patient Expectations of Benefit From Phase I Clinical Trials: Linguistic Considerations in Diagnosing a Therapeutic Misconception. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (4):329-344.
    The ethical treatment of cancer patientsparticipating in clinical trials requiresthat patients are well-informed about thepotential benefits and risks associated withparticipation. When patients enrolled in phaseI clinical trials report that their chance ofbenefit is very high, this is often taken as evidence of a failure of the informed consent process. We argue, however, that some simple themes from the philosophy of language may make such a conclusion less certain. First, the patient may (...)
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  18. Lynn A. Jansen & Daniel P. Sulmasy (2002). Proportionality, Terminal Suffering and the Restorative Goals of Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (4-5):321-337.
    Recent years have witnessed a growing concern that terminally illpatients are needlessly suffering in the dying process. This has ledto demands that physicians become more attentive in the assessment ofsuffering and that they treat their patients as `whole persons.'' Forthe most part, these demands have not fallen on deaf ears. It is nowwidely accepted that the relief of suffering is one of the fundamentalgoals of medicine. Without question this is a positive development.However, while the importance of treating suffering has generally (...)
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  19. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2002). Catholic Health Care at the Edge of Ground Zero. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 2 (1):15-16.
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  20. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2002). Crossing the Bridge: A Time of Transition for Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (1):5-7.
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  21. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2002). Death, Dignity, and the Theory of Value. Ethical Perspectives 9 (2):103-130.
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  22. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2002). Jonas, Hans. The Phenomenon of Life: Toward a Philosophical Biology. Review of Metaphysics 55 (4):863-865.
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  23. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2001). Catholic Health Care: Not Dead Yet. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 1 (1):41-50.
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  24. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2000). Commentary: Double Effect-Intention is the Solution, Not the Problem. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (1):26-29.
  25. Daniel P. Sulmasy (1999). Christian Ethics and the Delivery of Health Care. Hastings Center Report 29 (5):42-42.
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  26. Daniel P. Sulmasy (1999). What is an Oath and Why Should a Physician Swear One? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (4):329-346.
    While there has been much discussion about the role of oaths in medical ethics, this discussion has previously centered on the content of various oaths. Little conceptual work has been done to clarify what an oath is, or to show how an oath differs from a promise or a code of ethics, or to explore what general role oath-taking by physicians might play in medical ethics. Oaths, like promises, are performative utterances. But oaths are generally characterized by their greater moral (...)
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  27. Daniel P. Sulmasy (1998). Killing and Allowing to Die: Another Look. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 26 (1):55-64.
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  28. Peter B. Terry, Margaret Vettese, John Song, Jane Forman, Karen B. Haller, Deborah J. Miller, R. Stallings & Daniel P. Sulmasy (1998). End-of-Life Decision Making: When Patients and Surrogates Disagree. Journal of Clinical Ethics 10 (4):286-293.
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  29. Daniel P. Sulmasy (1997). Futility and the Varieties of Medical Judgment. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 18 (1-2).
    Pellegrino has argued that end-of-life decisions should be based upon the physician's assessment of the effectiveness of the treatment and the patient's assessment of its benefits and burdens. This would seem to imply that conditions for medical futility could be met either if there were a judgment of ineffectiveness, or if the patient were in a state in which he or she were incapable of a subjective judgment of the benefits and burdens of the treatment. I argue that a theory (...)
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  30. Daniel P. Sulmasy (1994). Managed Care and the New Medical Paternalism. Journal of Clinical Ethics 6 (4):324-326.
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  31. Daniel P. Sulmasy, Lisa S. Lehmann, David M. Levine & R. R. Raden (1994). Patients' Perceptions of the Quality of Informed Consent for Common Medical Procedures. Journal of Clinical Ethics 5 (3):189.
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  32. Daniel P. Sulmasy (1993). What's so Special About Medicine? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (1):379-380.
    Health care has increasingly come to be understood as a commodity. The ethical implications of such an understanding are significant. The author argues that health care is not a commodity because health care (1) is non-proprietary, (2) serves the needs of persons who, as patients, are uniquely vulnerable, (3) essentially involves a special human relationship which ought not be bought or sold, (4) helps to define what is meant by necessity and cannot be considered a commodity when subjected to rigorous (...)
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  33. Daniel P. Sulmasy (1993). What's so Special About Medicine? A Reply to de Ville. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (4):379-380.
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  34. Joanne Schatzlein & Daniel P. Sulmasy (1987). The Diagnosis of St. Francis: Evidence for Leprosy. Franciscan Studies 47 (1):181-217.
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