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  1. Kathleen E. Bachynski & Daniel S. Goldberg (2014). Youth Sports & Public Health: Framing Risks of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in American Football and Ice Hockey. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (3):323-333.
    The framing of the risks of experiencing mild traumatic brain injury in American football and ice hockey has an enormous impact in defining the scope of the problem and the remedies that are prioritized. According to the prevailing risk frame, an acceptable level of safety can be maintained in these contact sports through the application of technology, rule changes, and laws. An alternative frame acknowledging that these sports carry significant risks would produce very different ethical, political, and social debates.
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  2. Daniel S. Goldberg (2014). The Bioethics of Pain Management: Beyond Opioids. Routledge.
    In this book, public health ethicist Daniel S. Goldberg sets out to characterize the subjective experience of pain and its undertreatment within the US medical establishment, and puts forward public policy recommendations for ameliorating the undertreatment of pain. The book begins from the position that the overwhelming focus on opioid analgesics as a means for improving the undertreatment of pain is flawed, and argues instead that dominant Western models of biomedicine and objectivity delegitimize subjective knowledge of the body and pain (...)
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  3. Daniel S. Goldberg (2013). The Transformative Power of X-Rays in U.S. Scientific & Medical Litigation: Mechanical Objectivity inSmith V. Grant(1896). [REVIEW] Perspectives on Science 21 (1):23-57.
    On or about June 5, 1895, in Denver, Colorado, a 23-year-old law clerk named James Smith fell off a ladder and injured his left thigh near the hip. Three days later, on June 8, 1895, Smith consulted a physician named George Gibson. Gibson saw Smith twice.1 After several weeks of continued pain, on June 24, 1895 Grant consulted a different physician named W. W. Grant. Grant was already a well-known railway surgeon in the local medical community, and would go on (...)
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  4. Daniel S. Goldberg & Rebecca M. Puhl (2013). Obesity Stigma: A Failed and Ethically Dubious Strategy. Hastings Center Report 43 (3):5-6.
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  5. Daniel S. Goldberg (2012). Book Review: Karla FC Holloway, Private Bodies, Public Texts. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (2):137-139.
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  6. Daniel S. Goldberg (2010). Job and the Stigmatization of Chronic Pain. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 53 (3):425-438.
    The point of departure for this essay is the question of why pain is seriously undertreated in the United States. Some kinds of pain (for example, chronic nonmalignant pain) are treated worse than others (acute pain secondary to cancer), but there is excellent evidence that no matter what kind of pain, astonishingly large percentages of pain sufferers are undertreated (Furrow 2001; Hill 1995; Kirou-Mauro et al. 2009; Martino 1998; Morris 1991; NCHS 2006; Resnik, Rehm, and Minard 2001). Although some kinds (...)
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  7. Daniel S. Goldberg (2010). On the Erroneous Conflation of Opiophobia and the Undertreatment of Pain. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (11):20-22.
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  8. Daniel S. Goldberg (2009). In Support of a Broad Model of Public Health: Disparities, Social Epidemiology and Public Health Causation. Public Health Ethics 2 (1):70-83.
    Corresponding Author, Health Policy & Ethics Fellow, Chronic Disease Prevention & Control Research Center, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, 1709 Dryden, Suite 1025, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Tel.: 713.798.5482; Fax: 713 798 3990; Email: danielg{at}bcm.edu ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> . Abstract This article defends a broad model of public health, one that specifically addresses the social epidemiologic research suggesting that social conditions are primary determinants of health. The article proceeds by critiquing one (...)
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  9. Daniel S. Goldberg (2009). Exilic Effects of Illness and Pain in Solzhenitsyn's Cancer Ward: How Sharpening the Moral Imagination Can Facilitate Repatriation. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 30 (1):29-42.
    This essay uses Solzhenitsyn’s Cancer Ward to explore the exilic effects of illness and pain. The novel is uniquely suited for such an analysis given the theme of exile that predominates both in the narrative and in the composition of multiple characters within that narrative. I argue that illness, and in particular pain, is a liminal state, an existential hinterlands. The ethical approach to literature and medicine may suggest, as a response to these exilic effects, the need to cultivate connection (...)
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  10. Daniel S. Goldberg (2008). Concussions, Professional Sports, and Conflicts of Interest: Why the National Football League's Current Policies Are Bad for its (Players') Health. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 20 (4):337-355.
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  11. Daniel S. Goldberg (2007). Justice, Health Literacy and Social Epidemiology. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (11):18 – 20.
  12. Daniel S. Goldberg & Howard Brody (2007). Spirituality: Respect but Don't Reveal. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (7):21 – 22.
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