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  1. Donald Strong & Daniel Simberloff, Ecology.
    Ecology is composed of a remarkably diverse set of scientific disciplines. There are many different sub-fields in ecology—physiological, behavioral, evolutionary, population, community, ecosystem, and landscape ecology. Clearly, no summary will do them all justice. However, for the present context, ecology as a science can be divided into three basic areas—population, community, and ecosystem ecology. This entry will introduce some of the fundamental philosophical issues raised by these three disciplines. The first order of business is to ask what is the science (...)
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  2.  63
    Daniel Simberloff (2005). Non-Native Species DO Threaten the Natural Environment! Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (6):595-607.
    Sagoff [Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (2005), 215–236] argues, against growing empirical evidence, that major environmental impacts of non-native species are unproven. However, many such impacts, including extinctions of both island and continental species, have both been demonstrated and judged by the public to be harmful. Although more public attention has been focused on non-native animals than non-native plants, the latter more often cause ecosystem-wide impacts. Increased regulation of introduction of non-native species is, therefore, warranted, and, contra Sagoff’s (...)
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  3.  87
    Daniel Simberloff (1980). A Succession of Paradigms in Ecology: Essentialism to Materialism and Probabilism. Synthese 43 (1):3 - 39.
  4.  8
    Daniel Simberloff (2012). Nature, Natives, Nativism, and Management. Environmental Ethics 34 (1):5-25.
    Non-native species are implicated in many ecological and economic problems, and the field of invasion biology has burgeoned in response to this fact. However, classification, terminology, and management of non-native species generate controversies and even calls for abolition of the field. The fact that the basis for disputes is differing worldviews rather than simply interpretation of biological observations suggests that resolving arguments about non-native species will be difficult, independently of questions about the operational tractability of proposed courses of action.
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  5.  35
    Daniel Simberloff (2009). Moving Beyond Strawmen and Artificial Dichotomies: Adaptive Management When an Endangered Species Uses an Invasive One. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (1):73-80.
    Evans et al. (Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics, 2008) have attempted to enmesh me in their dispute with the Florida Bureau of Invasive Plant Management about a specific system, Kings Bay/Crystal River. In so doing, they repeatedly mischaracterize my positions in order to depict, incorrectly, invasion biology as monolithic and me as a representative of one extreme of a false dichotomy about management of introduced species. In addition, they introduce an issue irrelevant in this case (extinctions) and cite incorrect (...)
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  6.  23
    Daniel Simberloff (1980). Reply. Synthese 43 (1):79 - 93.
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  7.  18
    Daniel Simberloff (1987). Review. [REVIEW] Synthese 73 (2):399-405.
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  8. Daniel Simberloff (1978). Entropy, Information, and Life: Biophysics in the Novels of Thomas Pynchon. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 21 (4):617-625.
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  9. Daniel Simberloff, Philip Pauly, Wesley Stevens, William McCready & Marco Beretta (1996). Letters to the Editor. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 87:676-687.
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  10. Daniel Simberloff, Philip J. Pauly, Wesley M. Stevens, William D. McCready, Marco Beretta, Louise Y. Palmer, Steven Shapin & Mordechai Feingold (1996). Letters to the Editor. Isis 87 (4):676-687.
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