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Daniel M. Wegner [62]Daniel Wegner [15]
  1. Daniel Wegner, Response to Comment on “Wandering Minds: The Default Network and Stimulus-Independent Thought.
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  2. Daniel Wegner, Timescale Bias in the Attribution of Mind.
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  3. Daniel Wegner, Thought Suppression and Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors.
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  4. Daniel Wegner, Wandering Minds: The Default Network and Stimulus-Independent Thought.
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  5. Daniel Wegner, Dijksterhuis, A., Preston, J. & H. Aarts, Effects of Subliminal Priming of Self and God on Self-Attribution of Authorship for Events.
  6. Daniel Wegner, Goonzbleeminger, D. M. & L. Anooshian, Moral Development and Distributive Justice.
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  7. Jesse Preston & Daniel M. Wegner, Attitudes and Social Cognition.
    The authors found that the feeling of authorship for mental actions such as solving problems is enhanced by effort cues experienced during mental activity; misattribution of effort cues resulted in inadvertent plagiarism. Pairs of participants took turns solving anagrams as they exerted effort on an unrelated task. People inadvertently plagiarized their partners’ answers more often when they experienced high incidental effort while working on the problem and reduced effort as the solution appeared. This result was found for efforts produced when (...)
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  8. Daniel M. Wegner, Author's Personal Copy.
    It has been proposed that inferring personal authorship for an event gives rise to intentional binding, a perceptual illusion in which one’s action and inferred effect seem closer in time than they otherwise would (Haggard, Clark, & Kalogeras, 2002). Using a novel, naturalistic paradigm, we conducted two experiments to test this hypothesis and examine the relationship between binding and self-reported authorship. In both experiments, an important authorship indicator – consistency between one’s action and a subsequent event – was manipulated, and (...)
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  9. Daniel M. Wegner, Books Et Al.
    Imagine a gadget, call it “brain-ovision,” for brain scanning that doesn’t create pictures of brains at all. That’s right, no orbs spattered with colorful “activations” that need to be interpreted by neuroanatomists. Instead, with brain-o-vision, what a brain sees is what you get—an image of what that brain is experiencing. If the person who owns the brain is envisioning lunch, up pops a cheeseburger on the screen. If the person is reading a book, the screen shows the words. For that (...)
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  10. Daniel M. Wegner, Dream Rebound.
    ��People spent 5 min before sleep at home writing their stream of thought as they suppressed thoughts of a target person, thought of the person, or wrote freely after mentioning the person. These presleep references generally prompted people to report increased dreaming about the person. However, suppression instructions were particularly likely to have this in- fluence, increasing dreaming about the person as measured both by participants’ self-ratings of their dreams and by raters’ coding of mentions of the person in written (...)
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  11. Daniel M. Wegner, Hidden Complications of Thought Suppression.
    Although the suppression of thoughts may seem to be an effective solution when thoughts are unwanted, this strategy can lead to a recurrence of the very thought that one is attempting to suppress. This ironic effect is the most obvious unwanted outcome of suppression and has been investigated empirically for more than two decades. However, even when suppression does not lead to an ironic rebound of the unwanted thought, it puts an insidious cognitive load on the individual attempting to suppress. (...)
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  12. Daniel M. Wegner, How to Think, Say, or Do Precisely the Worst Thing for Any Occasion.
    In slapstick comedy, the worst thing that could happen usually does: The person with a sore toe manages to stub it, sometimes twice. Such errors also arise in daily life, and research traces the tendency to do precisely the worst thing to ironic processes of mental control. These monitoring processes keep us watchful for errors of thought, speech, and action and enable us to avoid the worst thing in most situations, but they also increase the likelihood of such errors when (...)
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  13. Daniel M. Wegner, Manic Thinking.
    ��This experiment found that the speed of thought affects mood. Thought speed was manipulated via participants’ paced reading of statements designed to induce either an elated or a depressed mood. Participants not only experienced more positive mood in response to elation than in response to depression statements, but also experienced an independent increase in positive mood when they had been thinking fast rather than slow—for both elation and depression statements. This effect of thought speed extended beyond mood to other experiences (...)
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  14. Daniel M. Wegner, Psychological Effects of Thought Acceleration.
    Six experiments found that manipulations that increase thought speed also yield positive affect. These experiments varied in both the methods used for accelerating thought (i.e., instructions to brainstorm freely, exposure to multiple ideas, encouragement to plagiarize others’ ideas, performance of easy cognitive tasks, narration of a silent video in fast-forward, and experimentally controlled reading speed) and the contents of the thoughts that were induced (from thoughts about money-making schemes to thoughts of five-letter words). The results suggested that effects of thought (...)
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  15. Daniel M. Wegner, The Hyperaccessibility of Suppressed Thoughts.
    The accessibility of suppressed thoughts was compared with the accessibility of thoughts on which Ss were consciously trying to concentrate. In Experiment I, Ss made associations to word prompts as they tried to suppress thinking about a target word (e.g., house) or tried to concentrate on that word. Under the cognitive load imposed by time pressure, they gave the target word in response to target-related prompts (e.g., home) more often during suppression than during concentration. In Experiment 2, reaction times for (...)
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  16. Daniel M. Wegner, The Illusion (Ch. 1).
    So, here you are, reading about conscious will. How could this have happened? One way to explain it would be to examine the causes of your behavior. A team of scientists could study your reported thoughts, emotions, and motives, your genetics and your history of learning, experience, and development, your social situation and culture, your memories and reaction times, your physiology and neuroanatomy, and lots of other things as well. If they somehow had access to all the information they could (...)
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  17. Daniel M. Wegner, Transactive Memory in Close Relationships.
    Memory perfttrmattce of 118 individuals who had been iu close dating relationships for at least 3 months was studied. For a memory task ostensibly to be performed by pairs, some Ss were paired..
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  18. Daniel M. Wegner, Thought Suppression.
    Key Words mental control, intrusive thought, rebound effect, ironic processes Abstract Although thought suppression is a popular form of mental control, research has indicated that it can be counterproductive, helping assure the very state of mind one had hoped to avoid. This chapter reviews the research on suppression, which spans a wide range of domains, including emotions, memory, interpersonal processes, psychophysiological reactions, and psychopathology. The chapter considers the relevant methodological and theoretical issues and suggests directions for future research.
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  19. Daniel M. Wegner, Thought Suppression and Mental.
    Consciously attempting not to think about something is a mental control strategy known as thought suppression. This strategy can be successful under certain conditions, but it often promotes an increase in the accessibility of the thought to consciousness, and along with this, a number of ironic processes and unwanted effects.
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  20. Daniel M. Wegner, What Do I Think You're Doing? Action Identification and Mind Attribution.
    The authors examined how a perceiver’s identification of a target person’s actions covaries with attributions of mind to the target. The authors found in Study 1 that the attribution of intentionality and cognition to a target was associated with identifying the target’s action in terms of high-level effects rather than low-level details. In Study 2, both action identification and mind attribution were greater for a liked target, and in Study 3, they were reduced for a target suffering misfortune. In Study (...)
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  21. Daniel M. Wegner & James Frederick, Through Action Identification.
    Social relations are vitally dependent on shared understanding of one another's actions. To initiate any sort of relationship, and to maintain a relationship once initiated, the partners to the relationship must com-.
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  22. Daniel M. Wegner & Kurt Gray, The Sting of Intentional Pain.
    When someone steps on your toe on purpose, it seems to hurt more than when the person does the same thing unintentionally. The physical parameters of the harm may not differ—your toe is flattened in both cases—but the psychological experience of pain is changed nonetheless. Intentional harms are premeditated by another person and have the specific purpose of causing pain. In a sense, intended harms are events initiated by one mind to communicate meaning (malice) to another, and this could shape (...)
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  23. Daniel M. Wegner & David J. Schneider, Mental Controi: The War of the Ghosts.
    Sometimes it feels as though we can control our minds. We catch ourselves looking out the window when we should be paying attention to someone talking, for example, and we purposefully return our attention to the conversation. Or we wrest our minds away from the bothersome thought of an upcoming dental appointment to focus on anything we can find that makes us less nervous. Control attempts such as these can meet with success, leaving us feeling the masters of our consciousness. (...)
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  24. Daniel M. Wegner & Betsy Sparrow, Unpriming: The Deactivation of Thoughts Through Expression.
    Unpriming is a decrease in the influence of primed knowledge following a behavior expressing that knowledge. The authors investigated strategies for unpriming the knowledge of an answer that is activated when people are asked to consider a simple question. Experiment 1 found that prior correct answering eliminated the bias people normally show toward correct responding when asked to answer yes–no questions randomly. Experiment 2 revealed that prior answering intended to be random did not unprime knowledge on subsequent attempts to answer (...)
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  25. Daniel M. Wegner & Betsy Sparrow, Vicarious Agency: Experiencing Control Over the Movements of Others.
    Participants watched themselves in a mirror while another person behind them, hidden from view, extended hands forward on each side where participants’ hands would normally appear. The hands performed a series of movements. When participants could hear instructions previewing each movement, they reported an enhanced feeling of controlling the hands. Hearing instructions for the movements also enhanced skin conductance responses when a rubber band was snapped on the other’s wrist after the movements. Such vicarious agency was not felt when the (...)
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  26. Daniel M. Wegner & Thalia Wheatley, Sources of the Experience of Will.
    Conscious will is an experience like the sensation of the color red, the percepfion of a friend's voice, or the enjoyment of a fine spring day. David Hume (1739/1888) appreciated the will in just this way, defining it as "nothing but the internal..
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  27. Daniel M. Wegner & Sophia Zanakos, Chronic Thought Suppression.
    Bear Suppression Inventory (WBSI), was I'ound to correlate with n>casurcs of obsessional thinking and depressive and anxious al'lect, t pridic( signs «I' clinical «hscssion ainong individuals prone (oward «h»c»»i«n >I (hi>>king, (« predict depression tive (h (», and to predict I''iilurc «I' electr«dermal responses to habituate am«ng pci>pic having emotional thoughts. The WBSI was inversely correlated with repression as assessed by the Repression-Sensitization Scale, and so tap» a trait that i» itc unlike rcprc»si«n:is traditi«n;illy c«nccivcd.
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  28. Hannah Reese, Celeste Beck & Daniel M. Wegner, Learning the Futility of the Thought Suppression Enterprise in Normal Experience and in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.
    Background:The belief that we can control our thoughts is not inevitably adaptive, particularly when it fuels mental control activities that have ironic unintended consequences. The conviction that the mind can and should be controlled can prompt people to suppress unwanted thoughts, and so can set the stage for the intrusive return of those very thoughts. An important question is whether or not these beliefs about the control of thoughts can be reduced experimentally. One possibility is that behavioral experiments aimed at (...)
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  29. Daniel Wegner, Descriptions with Adverbs of Quantification.
    In “Descriptions as Predicates” (Fara 2001) I argued that definite and indefinite descriptions should be given a uniform semantic treatment as predicates rather than as quantifier phrases. The aim of the current paper is to clarify and elaborate one of the arguments for the descriptions-aspredicates view, one that concerns the interaction of descriptions with adverbs of quantification.
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  30. Daniel Wegner, Everyday Magical Powers: The Role of Apparent Mental Causation in the Overestimation of Personal Influence.
    These studies examined whether having thoughts related to an event before it occurs leads people to infer that they caused the event— even when such causation might otherwise seem magical. In Study 1, people perceived that they had harmed another person via a voodoo hex. These perceptions were more likely among those who had first been induced to harbor evil thoughts about their victim. In Study 2, spectators of a peer’s basketball-shooting performance were more likely to perceive that they had (...)
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  31. Daniel Wegner, On the Feeling of Doing: Dysphoria and the Implicit Modulation of Authorship Ascription.
    The experience of authorship arises when we feel that observed effects (e.g., the onset of a light) are caused by our own actions (e.g., pushing a switch). This study tested whether dysphoric persons’ authorship ascription can be modulated implicitly in a situation in which the exclusivity of the cause of effects is ambiguous. In line with the idea that depressed individuals’ self-schemata include general views of uncontrollability, in a subliminal priming task we observed that dysphoric (compared with nondysphoric) participants experienced (...)
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  32. Daniel Wegner, Supporting Online Material For.
    Respondents saw photos and vignettes on the characters in random order (Appendix A), and selected a survey from a set of descriptions of 18 mental capacities or 6 personal judgments (Appendix B). For the survey, images and descriptions of the two characters to be compared appeared with a five-point scale anchored by “Much more this one” below each image, “Slightly more this one” next, and “Both equally” between the images. Respondents also supplied demographic information and made 7-point Likerttype ratings on (...)
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  33. Daniel Wegner, The Mind's Self-Portrait.
    Scientific psychology and neuroscience are taking increasingly precise and comprehensive pictures of the human mind, both in its physi- cal architecture and its functional processes. Meanwhile, each human mind has an abbreviated view of itself, a self-portrait that captures how it thinks it operates, and that therefore has been remarkably influential. The mind’s self-portrait has as a central feature the idea that thoughts cause actions, and that the self is thus an origin of the body’s actions. This self- portrait is (...)
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  34. Daniel M. Wegner & Kurt Gray, Blaming God for Our Pain: Human Suffering and the Divine Mind.
    Believing in God requires not only a leap of faith but also an extension of people’s normal capacity to perceive the minds of others. Usually, people perceive minds of all kinds by trying to understand their conscious experience (what it is like to be them) and their agency (what they can do). Although humans are perceived to have both agency and experience, humans appear to see God as possessing agency, but not experience. God’s unique mind is due, the authors suggest, (...)
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  35. Daniel M. Wegner & Kurt Gray, Torture and Judgments of Guilt.
    Although torture can establish guilt through confession, how are judgments of guilt made when tortured suspects do not confess? We suggest that perceived guilt is based inappropriately upon how much pain suspects appear to suffer during torture. Two psychological theories provide competing predictions about the link between pain and perceived blame: cognitive dissonance, which links pain to blame, and moral typecasting, which links pain to innocence. We hypothesized that dissonance might characterize the relationship between torture and blame for those close (...)
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  36. Myrthel Dogge, Marloes Schaap, Ruud Custers, Daniel M. Wegner & Henk Aarts (2012). When Moving Without Volition: Implied Self-Causation Enhances Binding Strength Between Involuntary Actions and Effects. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):501-506.
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  37. Kurt Gray & Daniel M. Wegner (2012). Feeling Robots and Human Zombies: Mind Perception and the Uncanny Valley. Cognition 125 (1):125-130.
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  38. Jeffrey P. Ebert & Daniel M. Wegner (2011). Mistaking Randomness for Free Will. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):965-971.
  39. Kurt Gray, T. Anne Knickman & Daniel M. Wegner (2011). More Dead Than Dead: Perceptions of Persons in the Persistent Vegetative State. Cognition 121 (2):275-280.
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  40. Kurt Gray, T. Anne Knickman & Daniel M. Wegner (2011). More Dead Than Dead: Perceptions of Persons in the Persistent Vegetative State. Cognition 121 (2):275-280.
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  41. Kurt Gray & Daniel M. Wegner (2011). Dimensions of Moral Emotions. Emotion Review 3 (3):258-260.
    Anger, disgust, elevation, sympathy, relief. If the subjective experience of each of these emotions is the same whether elicited by moral or nonmoral events, then what makes moral emotions unique? We suggest that the configuration of moral emotions is special—a configuration given by the underlying structure of morality. Research suggests that people divide the moral world along the two dimensions of valence (help/harm) and moral type (agent/patient). The intersection of these two dimensions gives four moral exemplars—heroes, villains, victims and beneficiaries—each (...)
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  42. James W. Moore, Daniel M. Wegner & Patrick Haggard (2011). Corrigendum to “Modulating the Sense of Agency with External Cues” [Consciousness and Cognition 18 (2009) 1056–1064]. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1935.
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  43. Ieflrey P. Ebert & Daniel M. Wegner (2010). Bending Time to One's Will. In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Lynn Nadel (eds.), Conscious Will and Responsibility: A Tribute to Benjamin Libet. Oup Usa. 134.
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  44. Jeffrey P. Ebert & Daniel M. Wegner (2010). Time Warp: Authorship Shapes the Perceived Timing of Actions and Events. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):481-489.
  45. James W. Moore, Daniel M. Wegner & Patrick Haggard (2009). Modulating the Sense of Agency with External Cues. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):1056-1064.
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  46. Jesse Preston & Daniel M. Wegner (2009). Elbow Grease: When Action Feels Like Work. In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press. 569--586.
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  47. Jesse Preston & Daniel M. Wegner (2009). Phenomenal and Metacognitive. Elbow Grease: When Action Feels Like Work. In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press.
     
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  48. Daniel M. Wegner (2008). Self is Magic. In John Baer, James C. Kaufman & Roy F. Baumeister (eds.), Are We Free?: Psychology and Free Will. Oup Usa.
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  49. Daniel M. Wegner (2008). The Gravity of Unwanted Thoughts: Asymmetric Priming Effects in Thought Suppression. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):114-124.
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  50. Heather Gray, Kurt Gray & Daniel Wegner (2007). Dimensions of Mind Perception. Science 315:619.
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