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  1. Danielle E. Warren (forthcoming). Corporate Scandals and Spoiled Identities: How Organizations Shift Stigma to Employees. Business Ethics Quarterly.
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  2. Danielle E. Warren, Joseph Gaspar & William S. Laufer (forthcoming). Is Formal Ethics Training Merely Cosmetic? In Advance. Business Ethics Quarterly.
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  3. Ali F. Ünal, Danielle E. Warren & Chao C. Chen (2012). The Normative Foundations of Unethical Supervision in Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 107 (1):5-19.
    As research in the areas of unethical and ethical leadership grows, we note the need for more consideration of the normative assumptions in the development of constructs. Here, we focus on a subset of this literature, the “dark side” of supervisory behavior. We assert that, in the absence of a normative grounding, scholars have implicitly adopted different intuitive ethical criteria, which has contributed to confusion regarding unethical and ethical supervisory behaviors as well as the proliferation of overlapping terms and fragmentation (...)
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  4. Marietta Peytcheva & Danielle E. Warren (2011). Auditor Professionalism. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 30 (1-2):33-57.
    The effectiveness of professional sanctions against violations rests upon the severity of sanctions and detection of violations. Here we examine perceptions of professional violation detection in auditing where the professional standards may conflict with the interests of the auditor’s firm. Using a sample of future and experienced auditors, we test the relationship between professional violations and auditors’ perceptions of the likelihood that severely-sanctioned violations will be discovered (a) by the audit profession, and (b) by the auditor’s firm. In our study, (...)
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  5. Djordjija Petkoski, Danielle E. Warren & William S. Laufer (2009). Collective Strategies in Fighting Corruption: Some Intuitions and Counter Intuitions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):815 - 822.
    This article explores the plausibility of some intuitions and counter intuitions about the anti-corruption efforts of MDBs and international organizations leveraging the power of the private sector. Regulation of a sizable percentage of global private sector actors now falls into a new area of international governance with innovative institutions, standards, and programs. We wrestle with the role and value of private sector partnerships and available informal and formal social controls. Crafting proportional informal controls (e.g., monitoring, evaluations, and sanctions) and proper (...)
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  6. Danielle E. Warren & William S. Laufer (2009). Are Corruption Indices a Self-Fulfilling Prophecy? A Social Labeling Perspective of Corruption. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):841 - 849.
    Rankings of countries by perceived corruption have emerged over the past decade as leading indicators of governance and development. Designed to highlight countries that are known to be corrupt, their objective is to encourage transparency and good governance. High rankings on corruption, it is argued, will serve as a strong incentive for reform. The practice of ranking and labeling countries "corrupt," however, may have a perverse effect. Consistent with Social Labeling Theory, we argue that perceptual indices can encourage the loss (...)
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  7. David Hess & Danielle E. Warren (2008). The Meaning and Meaningfulness of Corporate Social Initiatives. Business and Society Review 113 (2):163-197.
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  8. Danielle E. Warren (2007). Corporate Scandals and Spoiled Identities. Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (3):477-496.
    I apply stigma-management strategies to corporate scandals and expand on past research by (a) describing a particular type ofstigma management strategy that involves accepting responsibility while denying it, (b) delineating types of stigma that occur in scandals (demographic versus character), and (c) considering the moral implications of shifting stigmas that arise from scandals. By emphasizing the distinction between character and demographic stigma, I make progress in evaluating the moral implications of shifting different types of stigma.
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  9. Danielle E. Warren (2006). Conflicts of Interest: Challenges and Solutions in Business, Law, Medicine, and Public Policy. Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (2):307-308.
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  10. Danielle E. Warren (2006). Conflicts of Interest. Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (2):307-307.
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  11. Danielle E. Warren, Thomas W. Dunfee & Naihe Li (2004). Social Exchange in China: The Double-Edged Sword of Guanxi. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 55 (4):355 - 372.
    We present two studies that examine the effects of guanxi on multiple social groups from the perspective of Chinese business people. Study 1 (N = 203) tests the difference in perceived effects of six guanxi contextualizations. Study 2 (N = 195) examines the duality of guanxi as either helpful or harmful to social groups, depending on the contextualization. Findings suggest guanxi may result in positive as well as negative outcomes for focal actors and the aggregate.
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  12. Thomas W. Dunfee & Danielle E. Warren (2001). Is Guanxi Ethical? A Normative Analysis of Doing Business in China. Journal of Business Ethics 32 (3):191 - 204.
    This paper extends the discussion of guanxi beyond instrumental evaluations and advances a normative assessment of guanxi. Our discussion departs from previous analyses by not merely asking, Does guanxi work? but rather Should corporations use guanxi? The analysis begins with a review of traditional guanxi definitions and the changing economic and legal environment in China, both necessary precursors to understanding the role of guanxi in Chinese business transactions. This review leads us to suggest that there are distinct types of, and (...)
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