Search results for 'Danny Siegel' (try it on Scholar)

758 found
Order:
  1. Danny Siegel (ed.) (1983/1985). Where Heaven and Earth Touch: An Anthology of Midrash and Halachah. Town House Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  1
    P. Yule, Corpus der Minoischen, Mykenischen Siegel, F. Matz, N. Platon & I. Pini (1988). 2. iii. Iraklion, Archaologisches Museum. Die Siegel der Neupalastzeit. Journal of Hellenic Studies 108:257.
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  8
    Eli Siegel (1957). Free Poem on "the Siegel Theory of Opposites" in Relation to Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 16 (1):148-150.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  4
    Harvey Siegel (1993). Siegel, From Page One. Inquiry 11 (4):17-22.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  64
    Susanna Siegel (2010). The Contents of Visual Experience. Oxford.
    In this book, Susanna Siegel develops a framework for understanding the contents of visual experience, and argues that these contents involve all sorts of ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   63 citations  
  6. Susanna Siegel & Alex Byrne (forthcoming). Rich or Thin? In Bence Nanay (ed.), Current Controversies in Philosophy of Perception. Routledge
    Siegel and Byrne debate whether perceptual experiences present rich properties or exclusively thin properties.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  30
    Harvey Siegel (1997). Rationality Redeemed?: Further Dialogues on an Educational Ideal. Routedge.
    In Educating Reason, Harvey Siegel presented the case regarding rationality and critical thinking as fundamental education ideals. In Rationality Redeemed? , a collection of essays written since that time, he develops this view, responds to major criticisms raised against it, and engages those critics in dialogue. In developing his ideas and responding to critics, Siegel addresses main currents in contemporary thought, including feminism, postmodernism and multiculturalism.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   24 citations  
  8. Susanna Siegel (2002). The Role of Perception in Demonstrative Reference. Philosophers' Imprint 2 (1):1-21.
    Siegel defends "Limited Intentionism", a theory of what secures the semantic reference of uses of bare demonstratives ("this", "that" and their plurals). According to Limited Intentionism, demonstrative reference is fixed by perceptually anchored intentions on the part of the speaker.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  9. Harvey Siegel (1996). Instrumental Rationality and Naturalized Philosophy of Science. Philosophy of Science 63 (3):124.
    In two recent papers, I criticized Ronald N. Giere's and Larry Laudan's arguments for 'naturalizing' the philosophy of science (Siegel 1989, 1990). Both Giere and Laudan replied to my criticisms (Giere 1989, Laudan 1990b). The key issue arising in both interchanges is these naturalists' embrace of instrumental conceptions of rationality, and their concomitant rejection of non-instrumental conceptions of that key normative notion. In this reply I argue that their accounts of science's rationality as exclusively instrumental fail, and consequently that (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  10.  73
    Susanna Siegel, Dialogue About Philosophy in Spanish.
    This is a compilations of short talks presented at a workshop held at Harvard in April 14 on the life of analytic philosophy today in Spanish. Authors include Susanna Siegel, Diana Acosta and Patricia Marechal, Diana Perez, Laura Pérez, and Josefa Toribio.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Susanna Siegel (2012). The Contents of Visual Experience. Oxford University Press Usa.
    What do we see? We are visually conscious of colors and shapes, but are we also visually conscious of complex properties such as being John Malkovich? In this book, Susanna Siegel develops a framework for understanding the contents of visual experience, and argues that these contents involve all sorts of complex properties. Siegel starts by analyzing the notion of the contents of experience, and by arguing that theorists of all stripes should accept that experiences have contents. She then (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  12.  34
    Harvey Siegel & John Biro (1997). Epistemic Normativity, Argumentation, and Fallacies. Argumentation 11 (3):277-292.
    In Biro and Siegel we argued that a theory of argumentation mustfully engage the normativity of judgments about arguments, and we developedsuch a theory. In this paper we further develop and defend our theory.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  13.  9
    Harvey Siegel (1988). Rationality and Anemia (Response to Baigrie). Philosophy of Science 55 (3):442-447.
    In his (1988), Brian Baigrie criticizes my earlier discussion of the rationality of science (Siegel 1985). In this response, I argue that (1) Baigrie misses the point of my tripartite distinction between different questions one can ask about science's rationality, (2) Baigrie's argument that the history of the development of methodological principles is crucial to philosophical discussion of the rationality of science is flawed, and (3) Baigrie's charge that my view is "anemic" rests on a failure to appreciate the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14.  3
    Tim Luke, Paul Piccone, Fred Siegel & Michael Taves (1987). Roundtable on Intellectuals and the Academy. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1987 (71):5-35.
    Taves: Let us begin with the claim that universities are deadly to serious intellectual work. The university ethos fosters mediocrity, boredom and gutlessness. It has become a haven for conformist intellectuals who value patronage and status over intellectual quality and challenge. “Radical” academics are no exception; they too have bought into hyperspecialization, empiricism, professionalization, abstract theory, and have become marginal, predictable and politically irrelevant. If such is the case, what are the implications? Siegel: There is certainly a sense of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Tamar Gendler, Susanna Siegel & Steven M. Cahn (eds.) (2008). The Elements of Philosophy: Readings From Past and Present. Oxford University Press.
    The Elements of Philosophy: Readings from Past and Present is a comprehensive collection of historical and contemporary readings across the major fields of philosophy. With depth and quality, this introductory anthology offers a selection of readings that is both extensive and expansive; the readings span twenty-five centuries. They are organized topically into five parts: Religion and Belief, Moral and Political Philosophy, Metaphysics and Epistemology, Philosophy of Mind and Language, and Life and Death. The product of the collaboration of three highly (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Elaine V. Siegel (1991). Middle-Class Waifs: The Psychodynamic Treatment of Affectively Disturbed Children. Routledge.
    In this volume, a well-known psychoanalyst, dance therapist, and educational consultant chronicles her clinical work with deeply troubled children who fall between the cracks of our diagnostic and educational systems. These children, who frequently turn out to have been sexually or punitively abused, have no real emotional home despite the fact that they live in materially comfortable circumstances. In spite of their apparent brightness and precocity, they do not thrive in the classroom, where their disruptive behavior, tendency to act out, (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Elaine V. Siegel (2016). Middle-Class Waifs: The Psychodynamic Treatment of Affectively Disturbed Children. Routledge.
    In this volume, a well-known psychoanalyst, dance therapist, and educational consultant chronicles her clinical work with deeply troubled children who fall between the cracks of our diagnostic and educational systems. These children, who frequently turn out to have been sexually or punitively abused, have no real emotional home despite the fact that they live in materially comfortable circumstances. In spite of their apparent brightness and precocity, they do not thrive in the classroom, where their disruptive behavior, tendency to act out, (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Elaine V. Siegel (1996). Transformations: Countertransference During the Psychoanalytic Treatment of Incest, Real and Imagined. Routledge.
    In recent years, memories and reconstructions of incestuous child abuse have become common features of psychoanalytic treatment. Among some clinicians, such abuse is suspected even when there is little evidence. How does the analyst distinguish between incest real and imagined, and how do recovered memories of incest affect the analyst? In this poignant and beautifully written study, Elaine Siegel brings new insights to bear on these timely questions. An inveterate note taker, she discloses the countertransferential ruminations and associations to (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Elaine V. Siegel (2016). Transformations: Countertransference During the Psychoanalytic Treatment of Incest, Real and Imagined. Routledge.
    In recent years, memories and reconstructions of incestuous child abuse have become common features of psychoanalytic treatment. Among some clinicians, such abuse is suspected even when there is little evidence. How does the analyst distinguish between incest real and imagined, and how do recovered memories of incest affect the analyst? In this poignant and beautifully written study, Elaine Siegel brings new insights to bear on these timely questions. An inveterate note taker, she discloses the countertransferential ruminations and associations to (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Susanna Siegel (2012). Cognitive Penetrability and Perceptual Justification. Noûs 46 (2):201-222.
    In this paper I argue that it's possible that the contents of some visual experiences are influenced by the subject's prior beliefs, hopes, suspicions, desires, fears or other mental states, and that this possibility places constraints on the theory of perceptual justification that 'dogmatism' or 'phenomenal conservativism' cannot respect.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   45 citations  
  21. Susanna Siegel (forthcoming). Epistemic Charge. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society.
    I give some reasons to think that perceptual experiences redound on the rational standing of the subject, and explore the consequences of this idea for the global structure of justification.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Susanna Siegel (2006). Which Properties Are Represented in Perception? In Tamar S. Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.), Perceptual Experience. Oxford University Press 481--503.
    In discussions of perception and its relation to knowledge, it is common to distinguish what one comes to believe on the basis of perception from the distinctively perceptual basis of one's belief. The distinction can be drawn in terms of propositional contents: there are the contents that a perceiver comes to believe on the basis of her perception, on the one hand; and there are the contents properly attributed to perception itself, on the other. Consider the content.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   64 citations  
  23. Susanna Siegel (2013). The Epistemic Impact of the Etiology of Experience. Philosophical Studies 162 (3):697-722.
    In this paper I offer a theory of what makes certain influences on visual experiences by prior mental states (including desires, beliefs, moods, and fears) reduce the justificatory force of those experiences. The main idea is that experiences, like beliefs, can have rationally assessable etiologies, and when those etiologies are irrational, the experiences are epistemically downgraded.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  24. Susanna Siegel (2014). Affordances and the Contents of Perception. In Berit Brogaard (ed.), Does Perception Have Content? Oxford 39-76.
  25. Irwin M. Siegel (2000). Charcot and Duchenne: Of Mentors, Pupils, and Colleagues. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 43 (4):541-547.
  26. Harvey Siegel (2002). Multiculturalism, Universalism, and Science Education: In Search of Common Ground. Science Education 86 (6):803-820.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  27. Susanna Siegel (2016). How Is Wishful Seeing Like Wishful Thinking? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 92 (1):n/a-n/a.
    This paper makes the case that when wishful thinking ill-founds belief, the belief depends on the desire in ways can be recapitulated at the level of perceptual experience. The relevant kinds of desires include motivations, hopes, preferences, and goals. I distinguish between two modes of dependence of belief on desire in wishful thinking: selective or inquiry-related, and responsive or evidence-related. I offers a theory of basing on which beliefs are badly-based on desires, due to patterns of dependence that can found (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28. Susanna Siegel (2010). Do Visual Experiences Have Contents? In Bence -Nanay (ed.), Perceiving the World. Oxford
  29. Zoe Jenkin & Susanna Siegel (2015). Cognitive Penetrability: Modularity, Epistemology, and Ethics. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 6 (4):531-545.
    Introduction to Special Issue of Review of Philosophy and Psychology. Overview of the central issues in cognitive architecture, epistemology, and ethics surrounding cognitive penetrability. Special issue includes papers by philosophers and psychologists: Gary Lupyan, Fiona Macpherson, Reginald Adams, Anya Farennikova, Jona Vance, Francisco Marchi, Robert Cowan.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Susanna Siegel & Nicholas Silins (2015). The Epistemology of Perception. In Mohan Matthen (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Perception. Oxford
    An overview of the epistemology of perception, covering the nature of justification, immediate justification, the relationship between the metaphysics of perceptual experience and its rational role, the rational role of attention, and cognitive penetrability. The published version will contain a smaller bibliography, due to space constraints in the volume.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  31. Susanna Siegel (2015). Epistemic Evaluability and Perceptual Farce. In A. Raftopoulos (ed.), Cognitive Effects on Perception: New Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford
  32. Susanna Siegel (2013). Can Selection Effects on Experience Influence its Rational Role? In Tamar Gendler (ed.), Oxford Studies in Epistemology volume 4. Oxford 240.
    I distinguish between two kinds of selection effects on experience: selection of objects or features for experience, and anti-selection of experiences for cognitive uptake. I discuss the idea that both kinds of selection effects can lead to a form of confirmation bias at the level of perception, and argue that when this happens, selection effects can influence the rational role of experience.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  33. Susanna Siegel (2009). The Visual Experience of Causation. Philosophical Quarterly 59 (236):519-540.
    In this paper I argue that causal relations between objects are represented in visual experience, and contrast my argument and its conclusion with Michotte's results from the 1960's.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   19 citations  
  34. Susanna Siegel (2006). Subject and Object in the Contents of Visual Experience. Philosophical Review 115 (3):355--88.
    In this paper, I argue that certain perceptual relations are represented in visual experience.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  35. Susanna Siegel (2013). Are There Edenic Grounds of Perceptual Intentionality? Analysis 73 (2):329-344.
    This is a critical piece on *The Character of Consciousness* by David Chalmers. It focuses on Chalmers's two-stage view of perceptual content and the epistemology of perceptual belief that flows from this theory, and criticizes his theories of Edenic concepts, perceptual acquaintance, and perceptual belief.
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  36. Susanna Siegel (2008). The Epistemic Conception of Hallucination. In Adrian Haddock & Fiona Macpherson (eds.), Disjunctivism: Perception, Action and Knowledge. Oxford University Press 205--224.
    Early formulations of disjunctivism about perception refused to give any positive account of the nature of hallucination, beyond the uncontroversial fact that they can in some sense seem to the same to the subject as veridical perceptions. Recently, some disjunctivists have attempt to account for hallucination in purely epistemic terms, by developing detailed account of what it is for a hallucinaton to be indiscriminable from a veridical perception. In this paper I argue that the prospects for purely epistemic treatments of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  37. Ned Block & Susanna Siegel (2013). Attention and Perceptual Adaptation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):205-206.
  38. Harvey Siegel (1988). Educating Reason Rationality, Critical Thinking and Education. Routledge.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   36 citations  
  39. Susanna Siegel & Nicholas Silins (forthcoming). Attention and Perceptual Justification. In Adam Pautz & Daniel Stoljar (eds.), Festschrift for Ned Block. MIT Press
  40. Nicholas Silins & Susanna Siegel (2014). Consciousness, Attention, and Justification. In Elia Zardini & Dylan Dodd (eds.), Contemporary Perspectives on Scepticism and Perceptual Jusification. Oxford University Press
    We discuss the rational role of highly inattentive experiences, and argue that they can provide rational support for beliefs.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  41. Susanna Siegel (2007). How Can We Discover the Contents of Experience? Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (S1):127-42.
    In this paper I discuss several proposals for how to find out which contents visual experiences have, and I defend the method I.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  42. Susanna Siegel (2006). How Does Phenomenology Constrain Object-Seeing? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (3):429 – 441.
    Perception provides a form of contact with the world and the other people in it. For example, we can learn that Franco is sitting in his chair by seeing Franco; we can learn that his hair is gray by seeing the colour of his hair. Such perception enables us to understand primitive forms of language, such as demonstrative expressions.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  43.  21
    Susanna Siegel (2015). XV—Epistemic Charge. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 115 (3 pt 3):277-306.
    It is often assumed that while beliefs redound on the rational standing of a subject, perceptions do not. An irrational belief detracts from the rationality of believers, according to this assumption, but perceptions cannot do the same. I argue that perceptual experiences can have a rational standing, and that their epistemic status can be modulated by other psychological states that help produce them. Drawing on a metaphor from electricity, I call the epistemic status that perceptual experiences can have ‘epistemic charge'.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  5
    P. S. Duggan, A. W. Siegel, D. M. Blass, H. Bok, J. T. Coyle, R. Faden, J. Finkel, J. D. Gearhart, H. T. Greely, A. Hillis, A. Hoke, R. Johnson, M. Johnston, J. Kahn, D. Kerr & P. King (2009). Unintended Changes in Cognition, Mood, and Behavior Arising From Cell-Based Interventions for Neurological Conditions: Ethical Challenges. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):31-36.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  45. Susanna Siegel (2013). Reply to Fumerton, Huemer, and McGrath. Philosophical Studies 162 (3):749-757.
    Fumerton, Huemer, and McGrath each contributed to a symposium on "The Epistemic Impact of the Etiology of Experience" in Philosophical Studies. These are my replies their contributions.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  46. Susanna Siegel (2004). Indiscriminability and the Phenomenal. Philosophical Studies 120 (1-3):91-112.
    In this paper, I describe and criticize M.G.F. Martin's version of disjunctivism, and his argument for it from premises about self-knowledge.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  47.  89
    Max Harris Siegel (forthcoming). Ian Hacking, Why Is There Philosophy of Mathematics at All? [REVIEW] Mind 124.
  48. Susanna Siegel, The Contents of Perception. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This is the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy entry on the contents of perception.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  49. Alex Byrne, David Hilbert & Susanna Siegel (2007). Do We See More Than We Can Access? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (5-6):501-502.
    Short commentary on a paper by Ned Block.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  50.  16
    Max Siegel (2016). Priority Monism Is Contingent. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):23-32.
    This paper raises a challenge to Jonathan Schaffer's priority monism. I contend that monism may be true at the actual world but fail to hold as a matter of metaphysical necessity, contrary to Schaffer's view that monism, if true, is necessarily true. My argument challenges Schaffer for his reliance on contingent physical truths in an argument for a metaphysically necessary conclusion. A counterexample in which the actual laws of physics hold but the physical history of the universe is different shows (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 758