Search results for 'Daoism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Karyn L. Lai (2003). Conceptual Foundations for Environmental Ethics: A Daoist Perspective. Environmental Ethics 25 (3):247-266.score: 24.0
    The concepts dao and de in the Daodejing may be evoked to support a distinctive and plausible account of environmental holism. Dao refers to the totality of particulars, including the relations that hold between them, and the respective roles and functions of each within the whole. De refers to the distinctiveness of each particular, realized meaningfully only within the context of its interdependence with others, and its situatedness within the whole. Together, dao and de provide support for an ethical holism (...)
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  2. Jianliang Xu (2009). The Universal Sentiment of Daoist Morality. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (4):524-536.score: 24.0
    Daoism has often been misunderstood as moral nihilism or anti-moralism, but the true Daoism indeed adopts a positive attitude towards morality. At the foundation of its universal sentiment is an affirmation of morality. Daoism takes all things as the starting point of its values in moral philosophy, and ziran 自然 (sponstaneously so) as the foundation of its philosophy with the universal commitment. Daoism hopes to use “ Dao to create the best environment for survival, and to (...)
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  3. Barry Allen (2014). Daoism and Chinese Martial Arts. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (2):251-266.score: 24.0
    The now-global phenomenon of Asian martial arts traces back to something that began in China. The idea the Chinese communicated was the dual cultivation of the spiritual and the martial, each perfected in the other, with the proof of perfection being an effortless mastery of violence. I look at one phase of the interaction between Asian martial arts and Chinese thought, with a reading of the Zhuangzi 莊子 and the Daodejing 道德經 from a martial arts perspective. I do not claim (...)
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  4. Zhongjian Mou (2007). A Preliminary Discussion on Daoist Bionomy: On the Basis of Chen Yingning's Philosophy of Immortals. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (2):206-218.score: 24.0
    From the modern point of view, the Daoist regimen culture in China is actually a kind of oriental bionomy. Although it is less developed than the Western life sciences in terms of details and techniques, it has unique advantages in terms of its comprehensive grasp and dynamic observation of life, as well as its emphasis on the development of life potentiality and on the self adjustment and improvement of living bodies. Chen Yingning reestablished a Daoist bionomy through Xianxue 仙学 (Philosophy (...)
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  5. Ronnie Littlejohn (2009). Daoism: An Introduction. I.B. Tauris.score: 24.0
    "Littlejohn organizes his introduction around the central metaphor of a spreading kudzu vine, whose roots, trunk, stalks, branches, and leaves grow beneath, in, around, and over the vast and complex terrain of Chinese culture. He does a marvellous job exploring the origins, developments, and transformations of Daoism by guiding readers through canonical texts, across historical contexts, and around expressions of Daoism in fine art, popular symbols, literature, ritual, and other forms of material culture. The result is a masterful (...)
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  6. Ronnie Littlejohn & Jeffrey Dippmann (eds.) (2011). Riding the Wind With Liezi: New Perspectives on the Daoist Classic. State University of New York.score: 24.0
    The Liezi is the forgotten classic of Daoism. Along with the Laozi (Daodejing) and the Zhuangzi, it's been considered a Daoist masterwork since the mid-eighth century, yet unlike those well-read works, the Liezi is little known and receives scant scholarly attention. Nevertheless, the Liezi is an important text that sheds valuable light on the early history of Daoism, particularly the formative period of sectarian Daoism. We do not know exactly what shape the original text took, but what (...)
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  7. David Chai (2014). Meontological Generativity: A Daoist Reading of the Thing. Philosophy East and West 64 (2):303-318.score: 21.0
  8. Ronnie Littlejohn, Daoist Philosophy. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 21.0
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  9. David Chai (2014). Nothingness and the Clearing: Heidegger, Daoism and the Quest for Primal Clarity. Review of Metaphysics 67 (3): 583 - 601.score: 21.0
  10. X. U. Jianliang (2009). The Universal Sentiment of Daoist Morality. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (4):524-536.score: 21.0
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  11. Hans-Georg Moeller (2012). Daoist Criticisms of Confucian Sacrificial Rites. Sophia 51 (2):283-292.score: 21.0
  12. Mou Zhongjian (2007). A Preliminary Discussion on Daoist Bionomy: On the Basis of Chen Yingning's Philosophy of Immortals. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (2):206-218.score: 21.0
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  13. Zhihua Yao (2010). Typology of Nothing: Heidegger, Daoism and Buddhism. Comparative Philosophy 1 (1):78-89.score: 18.0
    Parmenides expelled nonbeing from the realm of knowledge and forbade us to think or talk about it. But still there has been a long tradition of nay-sayings throughout the history of Western and Eastern philosophy. Are those philosophers talking about the same nonbeing or nothing? If not, how do their concepts of nothing differ from each other? Could there be different types of nothing? Surveying the traditional classifications of nothing or nonbeing in the East and West have led me to (...)
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  14. Shaoming Chen (2010). On Pleasure: A Reflection on Happiness From the Confucian and Daoist Perspectives. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (2):179-195.score: 18.0
    This paper discusses the structural relationship between ideals on pleasure and pleasure as a human psychological phenomenon in Chinese thought. It describes the psychological phenomenon of pleasure, and compares different approaches by pre-Qin Confucian and Daoist scholars. It also analyzes its development in Song and Ming Confucianism. Finally, in the conclusion, the issue is transferred to a general understanding of happiness, so as to demonstrate the modern value of the classical ideological experience.
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  15. Eric Sean Nelson (2009). Responding with Dao : Early Daoist Ethics and the Environment. Philosophy East and West 59 (3):pp. 294-316.score: 18.0
    Early Daoism, as articulated in the Daodejing and the Zhuangzi, indirectly addresses environmental issues by intimating a non-reductive naturalistic ethics calling on humans to be open and responsive to the specificities and interconnections of the world and environment to which they belong. "Dao" is not a substantial immanent or transcendent entity but the lived enactment of the intrinsic worth of the "myriad things" and the natural world occurring through how humans address and are addressed by them. Early Daoism (...)
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  16. Steven Burik (2010). Thinking on the Edge: Heidegger, Derrida, and the Daoist Gateway ( Men 門). Philosophy East and West 60 (4):499-516.score: 18.0
    Beware of the abysses and the gorges, but also of the bridges and the barriers.It is fair to say that many philosophical interpretations of the Daoist classics have proceeded, or continue to proceed, to read into these works the quest for a transcendental, foundational principle, a permanent moment of rest beyond the turmoil of ever-changing things. According to this interpretation the Daoist sages are those who have for all time found this metaphysical ground of all things—"The Way" (dao 道)—and who (...)
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  17. Yong Huang (2005). A Copper Rule Versus the Golden Rule: A Daoist-Confucian Proposal for Global Ethics. Philosophy East and West 55 (3):394-425.score: 18.0
    : Here a moral principle called the "Copper Rule" is developed and defended as an alternative to the Golden Rule. First, the article focuses on two problems with the Golden Rule's traditional formulation of "Do (or don't do) unto others what you would (or would not) have them do unto you": it assumes (1) the uniformity of human needs and preferences and (2) that whatever is universally desired is good. Second, it examines three attempts to reformulate the Golden Rule—Marcus Singer's (...)
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  18. Hans-Rudolf Kantor (2011). 'Right Words Are Like the Reverse'—The Daoist Rhetoric and the Linguistic Strategy in Early Chinese Buddhism. Asian Philosophy 20 (3):283-307.score: 18.0
    ?Right words are like the reverse? is the concluding remark of chap. 78 in the Daoist classic Daodejing. Quoted in treatises composed by Seng Zhao (374?414), it designates the linguistic strategy used to unfold the Buddhist Madhyamaka meaning of ?emptiness? and ?ultimate truth?. In his treatise Things Do not Move, Seng Zhao demonstrates that ?motion and stillness? are not really contradictory, performing the deconstructive meaning of Buddhist ?emptiness? via the corresponding linguistic strategy. Though the topic of the discussion and the (...)
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  19. Lee H. Yearley (2005). Daoist Presentation and Persuasion: Wandering Among Zhuangzi's Kinds of Language. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (3):503 - 535.score: 18.0
    A concern central to virtually all full-blooded instances of religious ethics is how persuasively to represent a world central to our fulfillment that far exceeds our normal understanding. The treatment of three kinds of language in an early Daoist text, the Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu), contains an especially profound discussion and expression of such persuasive presentations in religious ethics. This study examines it and concludes by viewing Dante's Commedia through the perspectives Zhuangzi's ideas and practices present.
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  20. Koji Tanaka (2004). The Limit of Language in Daoism. Asian Philosophy 14 (2):191 – 205.score: 18.0
    The paper is concerned with the development of the paradoxical theme of Daoism. Based on Chad Hansen's interpretation of Daoism and Chinese philosophy in general, it traces the history of Daoism by following their treatment of the limit of language. The Daoists seem to have noticed that there is a limit to what language can do and that the limit of language is paradoxical. The 'theoretical' treatment of the paradox of the limit of language matures as (...) develops. Yet the Daoists seem to have noticed that the limit of language and its paradoxical nature cannot be overcome. At the end, we are left with the paradoxes of the Daoists. In this paper, we jump into the abyss of the Daoists' paradoxes from which there is no escape. But the Daoists' paradoxes are fun! (shrink)
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  21. David Storey (2011). The Uses and Abuses of Metaphysical Language in Heidegger, Derrida, and Daoism. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 3 (1):113-124.score: 18.0
    In this essay, I analyze Steven Burik’s recent comparisons of Heidegger, Derrida, and Daoism to explore two problems in comparative thought. The first concerns metaphysics: Is metaphysics a bad thing—or even an avoidable thing? The second concerns language: Is there any danger in focusing on language—in losing the forest of philosophy for the trees of the language in which it is conducted? These questions orbit a more basic one: What is the goal of comparative philosophy? In part one, I (...)
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  22. Ann A. Pang-White (2009). Nature, Interthing Intersubjectivity, and the Environment: A Comparative Analysis of Kant and Daoism. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (1):61-78.score: 18.0
    The Kantian philosophy, for many, largely represents the Modern West’s anthropocentric dominance of nature in its instrumental-rationalist orientation. Recently, some scholars have argued that Kant’s aesthetics offers significant resources for environmental ethics, while others believe that Kant’s flawed dualistic views in the second Critique severely undermine any environmental promise that aesthetic judgments may hold in Kant’s third Critique . This article first examines the meanings of nature in Kant’s three Critique s. It concludes that Kant’s aesthetic view toward sensible nature (...)
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  23. David E. Cooper (1994). Is Daoism 'Green'? Asian Philosophy 4 (2):119 – 125.score: 18.0
    Abstract Contemporary advocates of ?deep ecology? often appeal to daoist ideals as an early expression of ?respect? for nature. This appeal is inspired, presumably, by daoist attacks on ?convention? or ?artifice? which, as Zhuang Zi puts it, ?has been the ruin of primordial nature ... the ruin of the world?. But there are problems with this appeal. Daoists are extremely selective in the aspects of nature which they admire, and it is as much the skilled artisan as the person ?at (...)
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  24. Chad Hansen (1992). A Daoist Theory of Chinese Thought: A Philosophical Interpretation. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This ambitious book presents a new interpretation of Chinese thought guided both by a philosopher's sense of mystery and by a sound philosophical theory of meaning. That dual goal, Hansen argues, requires a unified translation theory. It must provide a single coherent account of the issues that motivated both the recently untangled Chinese linguistic analysis and the familiar moral-political disputes. Hansen's unified approach uncovers a philosophical sophistication in Daoism that traditional accounts have overlooked. The Daoist theory treats the imperious (...)
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  25. Xiufen Lu (2011). The Confucian Ideal of Great Harmony (Datong 大同), the Daoist Account of Change, and the Theory of Socialism in the Work of Li Dazhao. Asian Philosophy 21 (2):171 - 192.score: 18.0
    This paper discusses the theory of socialism endorsed by Li Dazhao, China's first Marxist, as an effort to integrate western ideas into the traditional Chinese thinking during the chaotic years of the 1920s. There are two aspects of Li's theory of socialism which, while related, are distinct: (1) a theory about the nature of socialist society, and (2) a theory about how a socialist society can be achieved in China. Li's development of (1) is influenced by his acceptance of the (...)
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  26. Eske Møllgaard (2007). An Introduction to Daoist Thought: Action, Language, and Ethics in Zhuangzi. Routledge.score: 18.0
    This is the first work available in English which addresses Zhuangzi’s thought as a whole. It presents an interpretation of the Zhuangzi, a book in thirty-three chapters that is the most important collection of Daoist texts in early China. The author introduces a complex reading that shows the unity of Zhuangzi’s thought, in particular in his views of action, language, and ethics. By addressing methodological questions that arise in reading Zhuangzi, a hermeneutics is developed which makes understanding Zhuangzi’s religious thought (...)
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  27. Robert J. Shepherd (2007). Perpetual Unease or Being at Ease? -- Derrida, Daoism, and the 'Metaphysics of Presence'. Philosophy East and West 57 (2):227-243.score: 18.0
    : Interesting work has been done on the striking similarities between the key arguments of the late Jacques Derrida and Daoism. While named otherwise, such Derridean signposts as the metaphysics of presence, the duality of language, and logocentrism are found in Daoist views of the relationship between reality, speech, writing, and knowledge. However, where the limits of language lead Derrida is different from where they take the authors of the Zhuangzi and the Daodejing, in particular regarding the question of (...)
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  28. Douglas L. Berger (2011). Did Buddhism Ever Go East?: The Westernization of Buddhism in Chad Hansen's Daoist Historiography. Philosophy East and West 61 (1):38-55.score: 18.0
    The scholarly career of Professor Chad Hansen has been devoted in large measure to an elucidation of the relationship between the classical Chinese language and the structure and aims of pre-Qin philosophical thought. His “mass-noun” hypothesis of classical Chinese thought, his notion of dao 道 as “guiding discourse,” and his clarifications of the significance of Mohism are marked achievements from which all of us have benefited immensely. In the opening chapters of A Daoist Theory of Chinese Thought, Hansen prefaces his (...)
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  29. R. P. Peerenboom (1991). Beyond Naturalism: A Reconstruction of Daoist Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 13 (1):3-22.score: 18.0
    In this paper I challenge the traditional reading of Daoism as naturalism and the interpretation of wu wei as “acting naturally.” I argue that such an interpretation is problematic and unhelpful to the would-be Daoist environmental ethicist. I then lay the groundwork for a philosophically viable environmental ethic by elucidating the pragmatic aspects of Daoist thought. While Daoism so interpreted is no panacea for all of our environmental ills, it does provide a methodology that may prove effective in (...)
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  30. Hagop Sarkissian (2010). The Darker Side of Daoist Primitivism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):312-329.score: 18.0
    The Primitivist (responsible for chapters 8-11 of the heterogeneous Zhuangzi) has largely been interpreted as just another exponent of the philosophy of the Laozi or Daodejing. This is a shame, because the Primitivist is an idiosyncratic thinker whose theories do not simply reiterate those found in the Laozi. In this essay, I argue that even though the Primitivist embraced some of the values of the Laozi’s brand of Daoism, (e.g. simplicity, harmony with nature, being rid of knowledge, etc.) he (...)
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  31. Chen Xia & Martin Schönfeld (2011). A Daoist Response to Climate Change. Journal of Global Ethics 7 (2):195 - 203.score: 18.0
    Climate change is now a global problem that can no longer be ignored. As climate change signals a civilization failure, the emerging reality will spur cultures everywhere to re-examine their traditions and rediscover the ecological wisdom of the ancients. Daoism will be no exception. This paper tries to explain the Daoist response to climate change by focusing on the manifestation of Dao, the responsibility of humankind and the ideal life. It shows that in its tenets and practices, Daoism (...)
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  32. Alan Fox (2007). Teaching Daoism as Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy 30 (1):1-28.score: 18.0
    I propose to consider chapter 1 of the famous, classic, and foundational Daoist text Dao De Jing, attributed to Laozi, in order to enable a non-expert to negotiate the subject of Daoism in a global philosophy context, and to further enhance the teaching of philosophy by introducing and emphasizing at least some of the controversies that inevitably surround interpretation of a classical set of texts and ideas. This forces students to see through simplistic dichotomies and form subtler conclusions, on (...)
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  33. Peipei Qiu (2001). Onitsura's Makoto and the Daoist Concept of the Natural. Philosophy East and West 51 (2):232-246.score: 18.0
    Makoto (sincerity, truth, or faithfulness) is an important concept in haikai (Japanese comic linked verse) poetics. The discussions on makoto by the seventeenth-century haikai master Uejima Onitsura (1661-1738) clearly refer to the Daoist discourse on ziran (the Natural), and the clarification of this intertextuality is crucial to the understanding of the theoretical connotations of the term.
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  34. Michael L. Raposa (2012). Musement as Listening: Daoist Perspectives on Peirce. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (2):207-221.score: 18.0
    Certain Daoist ideas explored here are compared with features of Peirce's philosophy, supplying a helpful perspective on the latter. In particular, I examine Zhuangzi's instruction about “listening” with one's spirit, along with certain discussions of “listening energy” drawn from texts dealing with the Daoist martial arts. I argue that Daoist “listening” and Peirce's concept of “musement” are both to be regarded as a disciplined form of attentiveness. By attending to no predetermined thing, a person thus disciplined is “ready” for the (...)
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  35. Livia Kohn (1991/2007). Daoist Mystical Philosophy: The Scripture of Western Ascension. Three Pines Press.score: 18.0
    Livia Kohn presents the first Western introduction to this central text of medieval Daoist mysticism.
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  36. Stephen R. Palmquist (2012). A Daoist Model for a Kantian Church. Comparative Philosophy 4 (1).score: 18.0
    Although significant differences undoubtedly exist between Daoism and Kant’s philosophy, the two systems also have some noteworthy similarities. After calling attention to a few such parallels and sketching the outlines of Kant’s philosophy of religion, this article focuses on an often-neglected feature of the latter: the four guiding principles of what Kant calls an “invisible church” (universality, purity, freedom, and unchangeableness). Numerous passages from Lao Z i’s classic text, Dao-De-Jing , seem to uphold these same principles, thus suggesting that (...)
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  37. Leng Wang (2008). An Approach to Emerson's Writing Style From a Daoist Perspective. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (3):295-306.score: 18.0
    There is a clear and controlling philosophical concern that governs Ralph Waldo Emerson’s essays: freedom from limitation and self-reliance from external authority. What makes it difficult to understand his essays, however, is his style, which is characterized by disconnection, paradox, and negation. These rhetorical techniques make the meaning of his writings elusive and slippery. Though many scholars have analyzed Emerson’s style, none have approached it through the writings of <span class='Hi'>Laozi</span>, an ancient Chinese philosopher. There are two reasons I compare (...)
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  38. Wing-Cheuk Chan (2008). Daoism and the Later Merleau-Ponty on Body. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 51:3-9.score: 18.0
    Laozi says, “The reason why I have great trouble is that I have a body.” Zhuangzi also asks us to forget the body. These seem to suggest that Daoism holds a negative view on the body. However, I will argue for a positive understanding of the Daoist doctrine of the body. In The Visible and the Invisible, the later Merleau‐Ponty aims to introduce an ontology of the flesh. With the help of his concept of the flesh of the world, (...)
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  39. David E. Cooper (2014). Daoism, Nature and Humanity. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 74:95-108.score: 18.0
    This paper sympathetically explores Daoism's relevance to environmental philosophy and to the aspiration of people to live in a manner convergent with nature. After discussing the Daoist understanding of nature and the dao (Way), the focus turns to the implications of these notions for our relationship to nature. The popular idea that Daoism encourages a return to a way of life is rejected. Instead, it is shown that the Daoist proposal is one of living more than people generally (...)
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  40. James A. Highland (2010). Daoism and Deliberative Dialogue. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 17 (1):46-55.score: 18.0
    I argue that there is a great deal in common between a Daoist sage and a contemporary moderator of deliberative dialogues. The most fundamental similarity is harmonious interaction of people facing the challenges of contemporary life. As they encourage and facilitate community action, the actions of the moderator of deliberative dialogue exemplify noncoercive action, wuwei, in the way such dialogue is eventually structured and in the ways the moderator acts to help all participants realize some common ground from which they (...)
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  41. Sharon Rowe & James D. Sellman (2003). An Uncommon Alliance: Ecofeminism and Classical Daoist Philosophy. Environmental Ethics 25 (2):129-148.score: 18.0
    Classical philosophical Daoism and ecofeminism converge on key points. Ecofeminism’s critique of Western dualistic metaphysics finds support in Daoism’s nondualistic, particularist, cosmological framework, which distinguishes pairs of complementary opposites within a process of dynamic transformation without committing itself to a binary, essentialist position as regards sex and gender. Daoism’s epistemological implications suggest a link to ecofeminism’s alignment with a situational and provisional model of knowledge. As a transformative philosophy, the cluster of concepts that give specificity to the (...)
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  42. Eric S. Nelson (2004). Responding to Heaven and Earth: Daoism, Heidegger and Ecology. Environmental Philosophy 1 (2):65-74.score: 18.0
    Although the words “nature” and “ecology” have to be qualified in discussing either Daoism or Heidegger, the author argues that a different and potentially helpful approach to questions of nature, ecology, and environmental ethics can be articulated from the works of Martin Heidegger and the early Daoist philosophers Laozi (Lao-Tzu) and Zhuangzi (Chuang-Tzu). Despite very different cultural contexts and philosophical strategies, they bring into play the spontaneity and event-character of nature while unfolding a sense of how to be responsive (...)
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  43. David Chai (2014). Daoism and Wu. Philosophy Compass 9 (10):663-671.score: 18.0
    This paper introduces the concept of nothingness as used in classical Daoist philosophy, building upon contemporary scholarship by offering a uniquely phenomenological reading of the term. It will be argued that the Chinese word wu bears upon two planes of reality concurrently: as ontological nothingness and as ontic nonbeing. Presenting wu in this dyadic manner is essential if we wish to avoid equating it with Dao itself, as many have been wont to do; rather, wu is the mystery that perpetually (...)
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  44. Qianfan Zhang (2013). Human Dignity in Classical Chinese Philosophy: The Daoist Perspective. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (3-4):493-510.score: 18.0
    This article discusses the Daoist contribution to the idea of human dignity in the classical Chinese philosophy, particularly in aspects that had been ignored by the Confucians and the Moists. By criticizing the traditional morality and reviving the faith in a primitive, self-sufficient life, Laozi and Zhuangzi add an important dimension to the classical understanding of human dignity: individual freedom, particularly the freedom of living under minimum burden, direction, and oppression of the state. By comparing the Daoist conception of human (...)
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  45. Brook Ziporyn (2013). ON SORT OF KNOWING The Daoist Unhewn. Common Knowledge 19 (1):111-130.score: 18.0
    The article, a contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies: On the Consequence of Blur,” analyzes the metaphysical assumptions behind the valorization of “clear and distinct ideas,” apodictic knowledge, and definitiveness, and it suggests alternatives derived from Daoist sources, where a different model of knowing prevails. That model undermines the idea of purposive willing in the service of goals known in advance, and undermines as well the bases for any human or divine activity designed to achieve definite ends. If (...)
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  46. Elliot Cohen (2011). Pt. 2. Comparative Perspectives: Daoism, Psychology, and Psychosomanautics. In Livia Kohn (ed.), Living Authentically: Daoist Contributions to Modern Psychology. Three Pines Press.score: 18.0
     
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  47. Christopher Cott & Adam Rock (2011). The Somatic Mind : Daoism and Chinese Medicine. In Livia Kohn (ed.), Living Authentically: Daoist Contributions to Modern Psychology/ Edited by Livia Kohn. Three Pines Press.score: 18.0
     
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  48. Donald Davis (2011). Daoism and Positive Psychology: Healing Self, Healing Society. In Livia Kohn (ed.), Living Authentically: Daoist Contributions to Modern Psychology. Three Pines Press.score: 18.0
     
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  49. Eduardo de Souza (2011). Health and Sexuality: Daoist Practice and Reichian Therapy. In Livia Kohn (ed.), Living Authentically: Daoist Contributions to Modern Psychology. Three Pines Press.score: 18.0
     
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  50. Johannes Gasser (2011). Daoist Cultivation in Modern Relationships. In Livia Kohn (ed.), Living Authentically: Daoist Contributions to Modern Psychology/ Edited by Livia Kohn. Three Pines Press.score: 18.0
     
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