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  1. Daphna Erdinast-Vulcan (2013). Between Philosophy and Literature: Bakhtin and the Question of the Subject. Stanford University Press.
    This is an original reading of Mikhail Bakhtin in the context of Western philosophical traditions and counter-traditions. The book portrays Bakhtin as a Modernist thinker torn between an ideological secularity and a profound religious sensibility, invariably concerned with questions of ethics and impelled to turn from philosophy to literature as another way of knowing. Most major studies of Bakhtin highlight the fragmented and apparently discontinuous nature of his work. Erdinast-Vulcan emphasizes, instead, the underlying coherence of the Bakhtinian project, reading its (...)
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  2.  39
    Daphna Erdinast-Vulcan (2008). Between the Face and the Voice: Bakhtin Meets Levinas. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 41 (1):43-58.
    The essay draws on a little-known fragment from M.M. Bakhtin’s Draft Exercise Notebooks of 1943 to highlight both the affinities and the divergences of the respective philosophical projects of Bakhtin and Emmanuel Levinas. The first part of the discussion follows their parallel itineraries through several points of convergence, from a sense of profound philosophical disenchantment to a conception of the ethical subject as living on borderlines, facing the other, irremediably vulnerable and infinitely responsible. The second part focuses on the “dialogic (...)
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  3.  46
    Daphna Erdinast-Vulcan (2007). That Which “has No Name in Philosophy”: Merleau-Ponty and the Language of Literature. Human Studies 30 (4):395 - 409.
    In this paper I address some related aspects of Merleau-Ponty’s unfinished texts, The Visible and the Invisible and The Prose of the World. The point of departure for my reading of these works is the sense of philosophical disillusionment which underlies and motivates them, and which, I argue, leads Merleau-Ponty towards an engagement with art in general and with literature in particular. I suggest that Merleau-Ponty’s emerging conception of ethics—premised on the paradox of a “universal singularity” and concerned with the (...)
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    Daphna Erdinast-Vulcan (2013). Freud, the Reluctant Philosopher. The European Legacy 19 (1):1-2.
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  5. Daphna Erdinast-Vulcan (1999). The Strange Short Fiction of Joseph Conrad Writing, Culture, and Subjectivity. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  6. Daphna Erdinast-Vulcan (2007). That Which “Has No Name in Philosophy”: Merleau-Ponty and the Language of Literature. Human Studies 30 (4):395-409.
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