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  1. Darlene Fozard Weaver (2013). Double Agents. Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (4):710-726.
    Jennifer Herdt's Putting On Virtue argues for the theological and normative superiority of noncompetitive accounts of divine and human agency. Although such accounts affirm the indispensability and sovereignty of divine grace they also acknowledge human agents as active participants in their own moral change. Indeed, Herdt contends we cannot coherently describe the human telos as entailing a transformation of character without affirming that human agents meaningfully contribute to that change. Nevertheless, a recurrent worry in Putting On Virtue is that persons (...)
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  2. Darlene Fozard Weaver (2011). The Acting Person and Christian Moral Life. Georgetown University Press.
    Persons and actions in Christian ethics -- Disruption of proper relation with God and others : sin and sins -- Intimacy with God and self-relation -- Fidelity to God and moral acting -- Truthfulness before God and naming moral actions -- Reconciliation in God and Christian life.
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  3. Darlene Fozard Weaver (2005). Death. In Gilbert Meilaender & William Werpehowski (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Theological Ethics. Oxford University Press.
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  4. Darlene Fozard Weaver (2003). Taking Sin Seriously. Journal of Religious Ethics 31 (1):45 - 74.
    Contemporary Roman Catholic ethics endeavors to take sin seriously by offering theologies of sin that emphasize it as a force and as a basic, personal orientation. Such efforts rightly counter the Catholic tradition's earlier reduction of sin to sins, and sins to external acts and moral culpability. But perhaps they go too far in this regard. By engaging Charles Curran, this study argues that inattention to sins undermines the theological referent of sin as a discourse that concerns more than moral (...)
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  5. Darlene Fozard Weaver (2002). Self Love and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Self love is an inescapable problem for ethics, yet much of contemporary ethics is reluctant to offer any normative moral anthropologies. Instead, secular ethics and contemporary culture promote a norm of self-realization which is subjective and uncritical. Christian ethics also fails to address this problem directly, because it tends to investigate self love within the context of conflicts between the self's interests and those of her neighbors. Self Love and Christian Ethics argues for right self love as the solution of (...)
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  6. Darlene Fozard Weaver (2001). How Sin Works: A Review Essay. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (3):471 - 501.
    Reviewing works by James Alison, Alistair McFadyen, Andrew Sung Park, Ted Peters, and Solomon Schimmel, the author suggests that the status and (dys)function of the discourse/doctrine of sin highlight tensions between theology and ethics in ways that suggest the character, limits, and promise of religious ethics. This literature commends attention to sin-talk because it helps religious ethicists to render more adequately the dynamics of human agency, sociality, and culture and because it raises questions about the nature and task of theology, (...)
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