Search results for 'Darrell R. Shepard' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Darrell R. Shepard (1975). Laws of Nature and Explanation. Teaching Philosophy 1 (2):182-183.score: 290.0
  2. Florence R. Shepard (2006). Commentary on “Our Recent Rousseau”. Environmental Philosophy 3 (1):27-34.score: 150.0
    In the “Commentary” on “Our Recent Rousseau: on Paul Shepard,” the author praises Lawrence Cahoone’s comprehensive and critical analysis of Shepard’s interdisciplinary scholarship in the field of human ecology, in particular, his theories of the wild and hunting and the contributions of archaic cultures to civilization. The author then elaborates further on the importance of the Paul Shepard’s unifying ideas of evolution, ontogeny, and neoteny to the understanding of the psychohistory of human development.
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  3. Frank L. Davis, Melissa Haussman, Ronald Hayduk, Christine Kelly, Joel Lefkowitz, Immanuel Ness, Laura Katz Olson, David Pfeiffer, Meredith Reid Sarkees, Benjamin Shepard, James R. Simmons, Solon J. Simmons & Claude E. Welch (2002). Teamsters and Turtles?: U.S. Progressive Political Movements in the 21st Century. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 120.0
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  4. G. F. Miller & R. N. Shepard (1988). Objective-Measure of Apparent Motion by Phase Discrimination. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 26 (6):514-514.score: 120.0
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  5. Lenahan L. O'Connell, Carroll U. Stephens, Michael Betz, Jon M. Shepard & Jamie R. Hendry (forthcoming). An Organizational Field Approach to Corporate Rationality: The Role of Stakeholder Activism. Business Ethics Quarterly.score: 120.0
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  6. P. Piet & R. Shepard (1996). Turning the Hard Problems Upside Down and Sideways Too. Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (4):313-29.score: 120.0
     
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  7. Philip T. Shepard (1988). Resolving Normative Differences or Healing a “Two-Cultures” Split? A Discussion of R.D. Hollander's “Values and Making Decisions About Agricultural Research”. Agriculture and Human Values 5 (4):79-83.score: 120.0
    Difficulties in getting participants in agricultural research policy disputes to work fairly with four different and sometimes conflicting normative viewpoints might be lessened by attending to the deeper cultural differences that lie behind differences of normative view. Mediation of policy disputes might work better if cultural differences were better understood and described impartially. By treating deep differences as ideological, in a non-pejorative sense, descriptions can forestall impulses to combat, improve communication, and open fresh prospects for compromise without attempting to change (...)
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  8. R. N. Shepard (1992). The Three-Dimensionality of Color: An Evolutionary Accommodation to an Enduring Property of the World. In Jerome Barkow, Leda Cosmides & John Tooby (eds.), The Adapted Mind: Evolutionary Psychology and the Generation of Culture. Oxford University Press. 495--532.score: 120.0
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  9. E. N. Sokolov (2001). Sphericity in Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (4):703-704.score: 14.0
    The perceptual circularity demonstrated by R. Shepard with respect to hue turns out to be a sphericity of color perception based on color excitation vectors of neuronal level. The spherical color model implicitly contains information concerning generalization under color learning. Subjective color differences are “computed” in neuronal nets being represented by amplitudes of evoked potentials triggered by color change. [Shepard].
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  10. Evan Thompson (1995). Colour Vision, Evolution, and Perceptual Content. Synthese 104 (1):1-32.score: 12.0
    b>. Computational models of colour vision assume that the biological function of colour vision is to detect surface reflectance. Some philosophers invoke these models as a basis for 'externalism' about perceptual content (content is distal) and 'objectivism' about colour (colour is surface reflectance). In an earlier article (Thompson et al. 1992), I criticized the 'computational objectivist' position on the basis of comparative colour vision: There are fundmental differences among the colour vision of animals and these differences do not converge on (...)
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  11. Dejan Todorovic (2001). Is Kinematic Geometry an Internalized Regularity? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (4):641-651.score: 12.0
    A general framework for the explanation of perceptual phenomena as internalizations of external regularities was developed by R. N. Shepard. A particular example of this framework is his account of perceived curvilinear apparent motions. This paper contains a brief summary of the relevant psychophysical data, some basic kinematical considerations and examples, and several criticisms of Shepard's account. The criticisms concern the feasibility of internalization of critical motion types, the roles of simplicity and uniqueness, the contrast between classical physics (...)
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  12. Lorraine G. Allan, Shepard Siegel, Pamela Toppan & Gregory R. Lockhead (1991). Assessment of the McCollough Effect by a Shift in Psychometric Function. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (1):21-24.score: 12.0
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  13. Shepard Siegel & Allan R. Wagner (1963). Extended Acquisition Training and Resistance to Extinction. Journal of Experimental Psychology 66 (3):308.score: 12.0
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  14. Javier R. Movellan & Jonathan D. Nelson (2001). Probabilistic Functionalism: A Unifying Paradigm for the Cognitive Sciences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (4):690-692.score: 6.0
    The probabilistic analysis of functional questions is maturing into a rigorous and coherent research paradigm that may unify the cognitive sciences, from the study of single neurons in the brain to the study of high level cognitive processes and distributed cognition. Endless debates about undecidable structural issues (modularity vs. interactivity, serial vs. parallel processing, iconic vs. propositional representations, symbolic vs. connectionist models) may be put aside in favor of a rigorous understanding of the problems solved by organisms in their natural (...)
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  15. John R. Pani (2001). The Mathematics of Symmetry Does Not Provide an Appropriate Model for the Human Understanding of Elementary Motions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (4):696-697.score: 6.0
    Shepard's article presents an impressive application of the mathematics of symmetry to the understanding of motion. However, there are basic psychological phenomena that the model does not handle well. These include the importance of the orientations of rotational motions to salient reference systems for the understanding of the motions. An alternative model of the understanding of rotations is sketched. [Shepard].
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