Search results for 'Databases, Nucleic Acid ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Margaret Sleeboom-Faulkner (ed.) (2009). Human Genetic Biobanks in Asia: Politics of Trust and Scientific Advancement. Routledge.score: 408.0
    This volume investigates human genetic biobanking and its regulation in various Asian countries and areas, including Japan, Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, ...
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  2. Tamra Lysaght (2011). Ethical Issues of Human Genetic Databases: A Challenge to Classical Health Research Ethics (Review). Asian Bioethics Review 3 (2):170-174.score: 120.0
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  3. Hsing-Chau Tseng, Chi-Hsiang Duan, Hui-Lien Tung & Hsiang-Jui Kung (2010). Retracted Article: Modern Business Ethics Research: Concepts, Theories, and Relationships. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 91 (4):587-597.score: 72.0
    The main purpose of this study is to explore and map the intellectual structure of business ethics studies during 1997–2006 by analyzing 85,000 cited references of 3,059 articles from three business ethics related journals in SSCI and SCI databases. In this article, co-citation analysis and social network analysis techniques are used to research intellectual structure of the business ethics literature. We are able to identify the important publications and the influential scholars as well as the correlations among (...)
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  4. Alexander Morgan Capron, Alexandre Mauron, Bernice Simone Elger, Andrea Boggio, Agomoni Ganguli-Mitra & Nikola Biller-Andorno (2009). Ethical Norms and the International Governance of Genetic Databases and Biobanks: Findings From an International Study. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (2):101-124.score: 66.0
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  5. M. Guillen (2000). Ethical-Legal Problems of DNA Databases in Criminal Investigation. Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (4):266-271.score: 66.0
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  6. Amitai Etzioni (2006). A Communitarian Approach: A Viewpoint on the Study of the Legal, Ethical and Policy Considerations Raised by DNA Tests and Databases. Journal of Law, Medicine Ethics 34 (2):214-221.score: 66.0
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  7. Jean V. McHale (2011). Accountability, Governance and Biobanks: The Ethics and Governance Committee as Guardian or as Toothless Tiger? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 19 (3):231-246.score: 66.0
    The huge potential of biobanks/genetic databases for the research community has been recognised across jurisdictions in both publicly funded and commercial sectors. But although there is tremendous potential there are likewise potential difficulties. The long-term storage of personal health information and samples poses major challenges. This is an area is fraught with ethical and legal uncertainties. Biobanks raise many questions of the control of rights, of consent, of privacy and confidentiality and of property in human material. It is thus unsurprising (...)
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  8. Alexander Morgan Capron Alexandre Mauron Bernice Simone Elger Andrea Boggio Agomoni Ganguli-Mitra Nikola Biller-Andorno (2009). Ethical Norms and the International Governance of Genetic Databases and Biobanks: Findings From an International Study. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (2):pp. 101-124.score: 66.0
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  9. Florence Appel (2005). Ethics Across the Computer Science Curriculum: Privacy Modules in an Introductory Database Course. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (4):635-644.score: 66.0
    This paper describes the author’s experience of infusing an introductory database course with privacy content, and the on-going project entitled Integrating Ethics Into the Database Curriculum, that evolved from that experience. The project, which has received funding from the National Science Foundation, involves the creation of a set of privacy modules that can be implemented systematically by database educators throughout the database design thread of an undergraduate course.
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  10. Hsing-Chau Tseng, Chi-Hsiang Duan, Hui-Lien Tung & Hsiang-Jui Kung (2010). Modern Business Ethics Research: Concepts, Theories, and Relationships. Journal of Business Ethics 91 (4):587 - 597.score: 60.0
    The main purpose of this study is to explore and map the intellectual structure of business ethics studies during 1997–2006 by analyzing 85,000 cited references of 3,059 articles from three business ethics related journals in SSCI and SCI databases. In this article, co-citation analysis and social network analysis techniques are used to research intellectual structure of the business ethics literature. We are able to identify the important publications and the influential scholars as well as the correlations among (...)
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  11. A. Patyn & K. Dierickx (2010). Forensic DNA Databases: Genetic Testing as a Societal Choice. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (5):319-320.score: 60.0
    In this brief report, the authors argue that while a lot of concerns about forensic DNA databases have been raised using arguments from biomedical ethics, these databases are used in a complete different context from other biomedical tools. Because they are used in the struggle against crime, the decision to create or store a genetic profile cannot be left to the individual. Instead, this decision is made by officials of a society. These decisions have to be based on a (...)
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  12. I. Brannstrom (2012). Publishing Ethics in Paediatric Research: A Cross-Cultural Comparative Review. Nursing Ethics 19 (2):268-278.score: 60.0
    The present article aims to scrutinize publishing ethics in the fields of paediatrics and paediatric nursing. Full-text readings of all original research articles in paediatrics from a high-income economy, i.e. Sweden, and from all low-income economies in Sub-Saharan Africa, were reviewed as they were indexed and stored in Web of Science for the search period from 1 January 2007 to 7 October 2009. The application of quantitative and qualitative content analysis revealed a marked discrepancy in publishing frequencies between the (...)
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  13. Kenneth W. Goodman & Anita Cava (2008). Bioethics, Business Ethics, and Science: Bioinformatics and the Future of Healthcare. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (04):361-372.score: 60.0
    The intersection of ethics, computing, and genetics plots a space not yet adequately mapped, despite its importance, indeed, its rapidly growing importance. Its subdomains are well-enough known: or the study of ethical issues in genetics and genomics, is part of core curricula everywhere. Ethics and computing is an established subfield. Computing and geneticshas in little more than a decade progressed from subsubspecialty to the sine qua non of contemporary biomedical research, and it bids fair to transform clinical practice. (...)
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  14. Riitta Suhonen, Minna Stolt, Heli Virtanen & Helena Leino-Kilpi (2011). Organizational Ethics: A Literature Review. Nursing Ethics 18 (3):285-303.score: 60.0
    The aim of the study was to report the results of a systematically conducted literature review of empirical studies about healthcare organizations’ ethics and management or leadership issues. Electronic databases MEDLINE and CINAHL yielded 909 citations. After a two stage application of the inclusion and exclusion criteria 56 full-text articles were included in the review. No large research programs were identified. Most of the studies were in acute hospital settings from the 1990s onwards. The studies focused on ethical challenges, (...)
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  15. Riitta Suhonen, Minna Stolt, Veikko Launis & Helena Leino-Kilpi (2010). Research on Ethics in Nursing Care for Older People: A Literature Review. Nursing Ethics 17 (3):337-352.score: 60.0
    The aim of this review was to analyse the empirical studies that focus on ethics in nursing care for older people, scoping the need and areas for further study. A search of the MEDLINE and CINAHL databases (earliest to August 2009) was conducted using the the keywords: ethic* and nursing or care or caring and elderly or aged or older. After a four-stage process, 71 empirical articles were included in the review, with informants ranging from elderly people to relatives, (...)
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  16. Federica Artizzu (2008). The Informed Consent Aftermath of the Genetic Revolution. An Italian Example of Implementation. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (2):181-190.score: 60.0
    A great part of human genetics research is carried out collecting data and building large databases of biological samples that are in a non-anonymous format. These constitute a valuable resource for future research. The construction of such databases and tissue banks facilitates important scientific progress. However, biobanks have been recognized as ethically problematic because they contain thousands of data that could expose individuals and populations to discrimination, stigmatization and psychological stress if misused. Informed consent is regarded as a cornerstone in (...)
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  17. Ignacio Ferrero & Alejo José G. Sison (2014). A Quantitative Analysis of Authors, Schools and Themes in Virtue Ethics Articles in Business Ethics and Management Journals. [REVIEW] Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (4):375-400.score: 60.0
    Virtue ethics is generally recognized as one of the three major schools of ethics, but is often waylaid by utilitarianism and deontology in business and management literature. EBSCO and ABI databases were used to look for articles in the Journal of Citation Reports publications between 1980 and 2011 containing the keywords ‘virtue ethics’, ‘virtue theory’, or ‘virtuousness’ in the abstract and ‘business’ or ‘management’ in the text. The search was refined to draw lists of the most prolific (...)
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  18. Garrath Williams (2005). Bioethics and Large-Scale Biobanking: Individualistic Ethics and Collective Projects. Genomics, Society and Policy 1 (2):50-66.score: 54.0
    Like most bioethical discussion, examination of human biobanks has been largely framed in terms of research subjects’ rights, principally informed consent, with some gestures toward public benefits. However, informed consent is for the competent, rights-bearing individual: focussing on the individual, it thus neglects social, economic and even political matters; focussing on the competent rights-bearer, it does not serve situations where consent is plainly inappropriate (eg, the young child) or where coercion can obviously be justified (the criminal). Using the British experience (...)
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  19. Mairi Levitt & Sue Weldon, A Well Placed Trust? Public Perceptions of the Governance of DNA Databases.score: 54.0
    Biobanks that are run on an opt-in basis depend on people having the motivation to give and to trust in those who control their samples. Yet in the UK trust in the healthcare system has been in decline and there have been a number of health-related scandals that have received widespread media and public attention. Given this background, and the previous public consultations on UK Biobank, the paper explores the way people express their trust and mistrust in the area of (...)
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  20. Mairi Levitt, Forensic Databases: Benefits and Ethical and Social Costs.score: 53.0
    Introduction: This article discusses ethical, legal and social issues raised by the collection, storage and use of DNA in forensic databases. Review: The largest and most inclusive forensic database in the world, the UK National DNA database (NDNAD), leads the worldwide trend towards greater inclusivity. The performance of the NDNAD, criteria for inclusion, legislative framework and plans for integrating forensic databases across Europe are discussed. Comparisons are drawn with UK biobank that has started collecting DNA samples linked to medical records (...)
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  21. Carel Ijsselmuiden, Debbie Marais, Douglas Wassenaar & Boitumelo Mokgatla-Moipolai (2012). Mapping African Ethical Review Committee Activity Onto Capacity Needs: The Marc Initiative and Hrweb's Interactive Database of Recs in Africa. Developing World Bioethics 12 (2):74-86.score: 52.0
    Health research initiatives worldwide are growing in scope and complexity, particularly as they move into the developing world. Expanding health research activity in low- and middle-income countries has resulted in a commensurate rise in the need for sound ethical review structures and functions in the form of Research Ethics Committees (RECs). Yet these seem to be lagging behind as a result of the enormous challenges facing these countries, including poor resource availability and lack of capacity. There is thus an (...)
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  22. Ruth Chadwick & Kåre Berg, Solidaroty and Equity : New Ethical Frameworks for Genetic Databases.score: 48.0
    Genetic database initiatives have given rise to considerable debate about their potential harms and benefits. The question arises as to whether existing ethical frameworks are sufficient to mediate between the competing interests at stake. One approach is to strengthen mechanisms for obtaining informed consent and for protecting confidentiality. However, there is increasing interest in other ethical frameworks, involving solidarity — participation in research for the common good — and the sharing of the benefits of research.
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  23. A. R. Holder (1988). Researchers and Subpoenas: The Troubling Precedent of the Selikoff Case. Irb 11 (6):8-10.score: 48.0
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  24. A. A. Lemke, M. E. Smith, W. A. Wolf & S. B. Trinidad (2010). Broad Data Sharing in Genetic Research: Views of Institutional Review Board Professionals. Irb 33 (3):1-5.score: 48.0
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  25. Jane Kaye (ed.) (2012). Governing Biobanks: Understanding the Interplay Between Law and Practice. Hart Pub..score: 48.0
     
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  26. Annamaria Carusi (2012). The Ethical Work That Regulations Will Not Do. Information, Communication and Society 15 (1):124-141.score: 46.0
    Ethical concerns in e-social science are often raised with respect to privacy, confidentiality, anonymity and the ethical and legal requirements that govern research. In this article, the authors focus on ethical aspects of e-research that are not directly related to ethical regulatory framework or requirements. These frameworks are often couched in terms of benefits or harms that can be incurred by participants in the research. The authors shift the focus to the sources of value in terms of which benefits or (...)
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  27. Carusi Annamaria & De Grandis Giovanni (2012). The Ethical Work That Regulations Will Not Do. Information, Communication and Society 15 (1):124-141.score: 46.0
    Ethical concerns in e-social science are often raised with respect to privacy, confidentiality, anonymity and the ethical and legal requirements that govern research. In this article, the authors focus on ethical aspects of e-research that are not directly related to ethical regulatory framework or requirements. These frameworks are often couched in terms of benefits or harms that can be incurred by participants in the research. The authors shift the focus to the sources of value in terms of which benefits or (...)
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  28. H. Fangerau (2004). Finding European Bioethical Literature: An Evaluation of the Leading Abstracting and Indexing Services. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (3):299-303.score: 42.0
    Objectives: In this study the author aimed to provide information for researchers to help them with the selection of suitable databases for finding medical ethics literature. The quantity of medical ethical literature that is indexed in different existing electronic bibliographies was ascertained. Method: Using the international journal index Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory, journals on medical ethics were identified. The electronic bibliographies indexing these journals were analysed. In an additional analysis documentalists indexing bioethical literature were asked to name European journals (...)
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  29. T. W. Ang, H. T. Have, J. H. Solbakk & H. Nys (2008). UNESCO Global Ethics Observatory: Database on Ethics Related Legislation and Guidelines. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (10):738-741.score: 42.0
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  30. B. Godard, J. Marshall, C. Laberge & B. M. Knoppers (2004). Strategies for Consulting with the Community: The Cases of Four Large-Scale Genetic Databases. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (3):457-477.score: 42.0
    Large-scale genetic databases are being developed in several countries around the world. However, these databases depend on public participation and acquiescence. In the past, information campaigns have been waged and little attention has been paid to dialogue. Nowadays, it is important to include the public in the development of scientific research and to encourage a free, open and useful dialogue among those involved. This paper is a review of community consultation strategies as part of four proposed large-scale genetic databases in (...)
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  31. Thomas B. Hodel-Widmer (2006). Designing Databases That Enhance People's Privacy Without Hindering Organizations. Ethics and Information Technology 8 (1):3-15.score: 42.0
    We argue that future database systems must provide autonomy for individuals for the privacy of data they manage. We propose a design for such a system, identify challenges and problems, and suggest some approaches to these. We enunciate the reasons for informational self-determination systems, which include legal, organizational and technical issues. Our main goal is to achieve a widely-accepted realistic and practical solution in order to ensure privacy for individuals in our future world, yet without hindering business and security.
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  32. H. T. Davies (2003). Introducing "ERIC", a Living Research Ethics Database. Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (2):117-117.score: 42.0
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  33. T. W. Ang, Hamj ten Have, J. H. Solbakk & Herman Nys (2008). UNESCO Global Ethics Observatory: Database on Ethics Related Legislation and Guidelines. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (10):738-741.score: 42.0
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  34. Richard Gh Cotton & Ourania Horaitis (2003). Mutation Databases and Ethical Considerations. In Bartha Maria Knoppers (ed.), Populations and Genetics: Legal and Socio-Ethical Perspectives. Martinus Nijhoff.score: 42.0
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  35. Sigrid Droste, Annegret Herrmann-Frank, Fueloep Scheibler & Tanja Krones (2011). Ethical Issues in Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation (ASCT) in Advanced Breast Cancer: A Systematic Literature Review. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):6-.score: 40.0
    Background: An effectiveness assessment on ASCT in locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer identified serious ethical issues associated with this intervention. Our objective was to systematically review these aspects by means of a literature analysis. Methods: We chose the reflexive Socratic approach as the review method using Hofmann's question list, conducted a comprehensive literature search in biomedical, psychological and ethics bibliographic databases and screened the resulting hits in a 2-step selection process. Relevant arguments were assembled from the included articles, (...)
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  36. Corey M. Angst (2009). Protect My Privacy or Support the Common-Good? Ethical Questions About Electronic Health Information Exchanges. Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):169 - 178.score: 40.0
    When information is transformed from what has traditionally been a paper-based format into digitized elements with meaning associated to them, new and intriguing discussions begin surrounding proper and improper uses of this codified and easily transmittable information. As these discussions continue, some health care providers, insurers, laboratories, pharmacies, and other healthcare stakeholders are creating and retroactively digitizing our medical information with the unambiguous endorsement of the federal government.Some argue that these enormous databases of medical information offer improved access to timely (...)
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  37. Tania Simoncelli (2006). Dangerous Excursions: The Case Against Expanding Forensic DNA Databases to Innocent Persons. Journal of Law, Medicine Ethics 34 (2):390-397.score: 36.0
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  38. J. J. Gamero, J. -L. Romero, J. -L. Peralta, M. Carvalho & F. Corte-Real (2007). Spanish Public Awareness Regarding DNA Profile Databases in Forensic Genetics: What Type of DNA Profiles Should Be Included? Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (10):598-604.score: 36.0
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  39. B. M. Knoppers, J. R. Harris, P. R. Burton, M. Murtagh, D. Cox, M. Deschenes, I. Fortier, T. J. Hudson, J. Kaye & K. Lindpaintner (2011). From Genomic Databases to Translation: A Call to Action. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (8):515-516.score: 36.0
    The rapid rise of international collaborative science has enabled access to genomic data. In this article, it is argued that to move beyond mapping genomic variation to understanding its role in complex disease aetiology and treatment will require extending data sharing for the purposes of clinical research translation and implementation.
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  40. Tania Simoncelli & Barry Steinhardt (2005). California's Proposition 69: A Dangerous Precedent for Criminal DNA Databases. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):279-293.score: 36.0
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  41. Henry T. Greely, Daniel P. Riordan, Nanibaa' A. Garrison & Joanna L. Mountain (2006). Family Ties: The Use of DNA Offender Databases to Catch Offenders' Kin. Journal of Law, Medicine Ethics 34 (2):248-262.score: 36.0
  42. Marianne Talbot (2012). Bioethics: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Using this book; Notes for instructors; Part I. Bioethics and Ethics: 1. Biotechnology and bioethics: what it's all about; 2. Ethics in general: ethics, action and freedom; 3. Ethics in the context of society: ethics, society and the law; 4. Ethical theories: virtue, duty and happiness; 5. Identifying and evaluating arguments: logic and morality; 6. General arguments: unnatural, disgusting, risky, only opinion; Part II. The Beginning and End of Life: Section (...)
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  43. Tamar Joy Kahn & Hannelore Ninomiya (2003). Changing Vocabularies: A Guide to Help Bioethics Searchers Find Relevant Literature in National Library of Medicine Databases Using the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Indexing Vocabulary. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (3):275-311.score: 36.0
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  44. Maria Canellopoulou-Bottis (forthcoming). A Different Kind of War: Internet Databases and Legal Protection or How the Strict Intellectual Property Laws of the West Threaten the Developing Countries' Information Commons. International Review of Information Ethics.score: 36.0
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  45. S. M. C. Gibbons (2007). Governing Human Genetic Databases, Biobanks and Research Tissue Banks. Research Ethics 3 (3):106-108.score: 36.0
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  46. David B. Resnik (2003). Strengthening the United States' Database Protection Laws: Balancing Public Access and Private Control. Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (3):301-318.score: 34.0
    This paper develops three arguments for increasing the strength of database protection under U.S. law. First, stronger protections would encourage private investment in database development, and private databases have many potential benefits for science and industry. Second, stronger protections would discourage extensive use of private licenses to protect databases and would allow for greater public control over database laws and policies. Third, stronger database protections in the U.S. would harmonize U.S. and E.U. laws and would thus enhance international trade, commerce, (...)
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  47. N. Sofaer & D. Strech (2011). Reasons Why Post-Trial Access to Trial Drugs Should, or Need Not Be Ensured to Research Participants: A Systematic Review. Public Health Ethics 4 (2):160-184.score: 33.0
    Background : researchers and sponsors increasingly confront the issue of whether participants in a clinical trial should have post-trial access (PTA) to the trial drug. Legislation and guidelines are inconsistent, ambiguous or silent about many aspects of PTA. Recent research highlights the potential importance of systematic reviews (SRs) of reason-based literatures in informing decision-making in medicine, medical research and health policy. Purpose: to systematically review reasons why drug trial participants should, or need not be ensured PTA to the trial drug (...)
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  48. H. Schmidt & S. Callier (2012). How Anonymous is 'Anonymous'? Some Suggestions Towards a Coherent Universal Coding System for Genetic Samples. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (5):304-309.score: 30.0
    So-called ‘anonymous’ tissue samples are widely used in research. Because they lack externally identifying information, they are viewed as useful in reconciling conflicts between the control, privacy and confidentiality interests of those from whom the samples originated and the public (or commercial) interest in carrying out research, as reflected in ‘consent or anonymise’ policies. High level guidance documents suggest that withdrawal of consent and samples and the provision of feedback are impossible in the case of anonymous samples. In view of (...)
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  49. Gardar Árnason (2010). Neuroimaging, Uncertainty, and the Problem of Dispositions. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (02):188-.score: 30.0
    Brain research in neuroscience and related fields is changing our understanding of the brain and its relation to the mind and to human behavior, giving a new impetus to the problem of free will and moral responsibility. The reactions have covered the entire range, from claims to the effect that neuroscientific research is showing that our folkrnason, Ph.D., is Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Department of Social and Moral Philosophy, University of Helsinki, Finland. His research interests include bioethics, neuroethics, and (...)
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  50. D. Strech, M. Synofzik & G. Marckmann (2008). Systematic Reviews of Empirical Bioethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (6):472-477.score: 30.0
    Background: Publications and discussions of survey research in empirical bioethics have steadily increased over the past two decades. However, findings often differ among studies with similar research questions. As a consequence, ethical reasoning that considers only parts of the existing literature and does not apply systematic reviews tends to be biased. To date, we lack a systematic review (SR) methodology that takes into account the specific conceptual and practical challenges of empirical bioethics. Methods: The steps of systematically reviewing empirical findings (...)
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