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  1. Caleb Henry Smith, David A. Oakley & John Morton (2013). Increased Response Time of Primed Associates Following an “Episodic” Hypnotic Amnesia Suggestion: A Case of Unconscious Volition. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1305-1317.
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  2. David A. Oakley & Peter W. Halligan (2011). Using Hypnosis to Gain Insights Into Healthy and Pathological Cognitive Functioning. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):328-331.
  3. David A. Oakley & Peter W. Halligan (2009). Hypnotic Suggestion and Cognitive Neuroscience. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (6):264-270.
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  4. David A. Oakley & Patrick Haggard (2006). The Timing of Brain Events: Authors' Response to Libet's 'Reply'. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):548-550.
  5. Balaganesh Gandhi & David A. Oakley (2005). Does 'Hypnosis' by Any Other Name Smell as Sweet? The Efficacy of 'Hypnotic' Inductions Depends on the Label 'Hypnosis'. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (2):304-315.
  6. Patrick Haggard, P. Catledge, M. Dafydd & David A. Oakley (2004). Anomalous Control: When "Free Will" is Not Conscious. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):646-654.
  7. David A. Oakley (1999). Hypnosis and Consciousness: A Structural Model. Contemporary Hypnosis 16:215-223.
  8. David A. Oakley (ed.) (1986). Mind and Brain. Methuen.
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  9. David A. Oakley & L. C. Eames (1986). The Plurality of Consciousness. In , Mind and Brain. Methuen. 33-49.
     
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  10. David A. Oakley (1985). Animal Awareness, Consciousness, and Self-Image. In , Brain and Mind. Methuen.
     
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  11. David A. Oakley (ed.) (1985). Brain and Mind. Methuen.
  12. David A. Oakley & H. C. Plotkin (eds.) (1979). Brain, Behaviour, and Evolution. Methuen and Company.
    It has always concentrated upon man, and usually the comparative approach has not been used to study the evolution of behaviour, but in the hope that ...
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