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Profile: David Reidy (University of Tennessee, Knoxville)
  1. David A. Reidy, D. J. & D. Ph, Introduction to Ashgate Volume on John Rawls.
    This is the introduction to the Ashgate volume on Rawls in their history of political thought series. It puts Rawls's life and work in context and then discusses the essays included in the volume, essays of high quality likely to shape scholarship on Rawls for the coming decades.
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  2. David A. Reidy, D. J. & D. Ph, John Rawls.
    This is an encyclopedia entry (for the IVR Encyclopedia of legal and political philosophy) covering John Rawls. It aims to provide a general but not superficial introduction to Rawls's theory of justice, justice as fairness.
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  3. David A. Reidy (forthcoming). Hate Crimes, Oppression, and Legal Theory. Public Affairs Quarterly.
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  4. Jon Mandle & David A. Reidy (eds.) (2013). A Companion to Rawls. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Wide ranging and up to date, this is the single most comprehensive treatment of the most influential political philosopher of the 20th century, John Rawls.
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  5. David A. Reidy (2012). On the Human Right to Democracy: Searching for Sense Without Stilts. Journal of Social Philosophy 43 (2):177-203.
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  6. David A. Reidy (2010). Human Rights and Liberal Toleration. Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 23 (2):287-317.
    Offers, by way of systematic reconstruction of Rawls's Law of Peoples, a principled view of human rights and liberal toleration.
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  7. David A. Reidy (2009). When Good Alone Isn't Enough. Social Theory and Practice 35 (4):623-647.
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  8. David A. Reidy (2008). Human Rights: Institutions and Agendas. Public Affairs Quarterly 22 (4):409-433.
    Distinguishes and shows how one can coherently affirm distinct human rights agendas rooted in distinct conceptions of human rights, each with its own normative aim and institutional and discursive field of application.
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  9. David A. Reidy, D. J. & D. Ph (2008). William Talbott's Which Rights Should Be Universal? [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 9 (2):181-191.
    In this review essay, I first set out and then subject to criticism the main claims advanced by William Talbott in his excellent recent book, “Which Rights Should be Universal?”. Talbott offers a conception of basic universal human rights as the minimally necessary and sufficient conditions to political legitimacy. I argue that his conception is at once too robustly liberal and democratic and too inattentive to key features of the rule of law to play this role. I suggest that John (...)
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  10. David A. Reidy (2007). A Just Global Economy: In Defense of Rawls. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 11 (2):193 - 236.
    In The Law of Peoples, John Rawls does not discuss justice and the global economy at great length or in great detail. What he does say has not been well-received. The prevailing view seems to be that what Rawls says in The Law of Peoples regarding global economic justice is both inconsistent with and a betrayal of his own liberal egalitarian commitments, an unexpected and unacceptable defense of the status quo. This view is, I think, mistaken. Rawls’s position on global (...)
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  11. David A. Reidy (2007). Reciprocity and Reasonable Disagreement: From Liberal to Democratic Legitimacy. Philosophical Studies 132 (2):243 - 291.
    At the center of Rawls’s work post-1980 is the question of how legitimate coercive state action is possible in a liberal democracy under conditions of reasonable disagreement. And at the heart of Rawls’s answer to this question is his liberal principle of legitimacy. In this paper I argue that once we attend carefully to the depth and range of reasonable disagreement, Rawls’s liberal principle of legitimacy turns out to be either wildly utopian or simply toothless, depending on how one reads (...)
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  12. Rex Martin & David A. Reidy (eds.) (2006). Rawls's Law of Peoples: A Realistic Utopia? Blackwell Pub..
    This volume examines Rawls’s theory of international justice as worked out in his controversial last book, The Law of Peoples.
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  13. David A. Reidy (2006). And Justice. Economics and Philosophy 22:125-137.
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  14. David A. Reidy (2006). Rushing to Revolution? A Second Look at Globalization and Justice. Economics and Philosophy 22 (1):125-137.
  15. Jeppe von Platz & David A. Reidy (2006). The Structural Diversity of Historical Injustices. Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (3):360–376.
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  16. David A. Reidy (2005). An Internationalist Conception of Human Rights. Philosophical Forum 36 (4):367–397.
  17. David A. Reidy (2005). Review: Hayden, Rawls: Towards a Just World Order. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 9:155-164.
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  18. David A. Reidy (2004). Rawls on International Justice: A Defense. Political Theory 32 (3):291-319.
    Rawls's "The Law of Peoples" has not been well received. The first task of this essay is to draw (what the author regards as) Rawls's position out of his own text where it is imperfectly and incompletely expressed. Rawls's view, once fully and clearly presented, is less vulnerable to common criticisms than it is often taken to be. The second task of this essay is to go beyond Rawls's text to develop some supplementary lines of argument, still Rawlsian in spirit, (...)
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  19. David A. Reidy (2002). J. Patrick Dobel, Public Integrity:Public Integrity. Ethics 112 (3):607-610.
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  20. David A. Reidy (2002). Justice and the Tutelary State. Southern Journal of Philosophy 40 (1):97-122.
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  21. David A. Reidy (2001). Vincent Samar, Justifying Judgment: Practicing Law and Philosophy:Justifying Judgment: Practicing Law and Philosophy. Ethics 112 (1):180-182.
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  22. David A. Reidy (2001). Pluralism, Liberal Democracy, and Compulsory Education: Accommodation and Assimilation. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (4):585–609.
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  23. David A. Reidy (2000). Richard Markovits, Matters of Principle: Legitimate Legal Argument and Constitutional Interpretation:Matters of Principle: Legitimate Legal Argument and Constitutional Interpretation. Ethics 110 (4):851-853.
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  24. David A. Reidy (2000). Rawls's Wide View of Public Reason: Not Wide Enough. Res Publica 6 (1):49-72.
    What sorts of reasons are i) required and ii) morally acceptable when citizens in a pluralist liberal democracy undertake to resolve pressing political issues? This paper presents and then critically examines John Rawls''s answer to this question: his so called wide-view of public reason. Rawls''s view requires that the content of liberal public reason prove rich enough to yield a reasoned and determinate resolution for most if not all fundamental political issues. I argue that the content of liberal public reason (...)
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  25. David A. Reidy (1998). False Pleasures and Plato's Philebus. Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (3):343-356.
  26. David A. Reidy (1996). Education for Citizenship in a Pluralist Liberal Democracy. Journal of Value Inquiry 30 (1-2):25-42.
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