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  1. David Armstrong & JeeLoo Liu, The Nature of Consciousness Handout.
    The mental: [I] The unconscious: A totally unconscious man has a mind and the mind is in various states. ___ He does not lack knowledge and beliefs. ___ He may be credited with memories and skills. ___ He may be credited with likes and dislikes, attitudes and emotions, current desires and current aims and purposes. He may be said to have certain traits of character and temperament. He may be said to be in certain moods..... [The mental states of a (...)
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  2. David Armstrong & Thomas M. Burton (forthcoming). Book Censorship in France. Journal of Information Ethics.
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  3. David Armstrong (2011). Epicurean Virtues, Epicurean Friendship: Cicero Vs. The Herculaneum Papyri. In Jeffrey Fish & Kirk R. Sanders (eds.), Epicurus and the Epicurean Tradition. Cambridge University Press. 105.
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  4. David M. Armstrong (2010). The Causal Theory of Properties. Philosophical Topics 26 (1/2):25-37.
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  5. Liliana Albertazzi, Ignacio Angelelli, David Armstrong, Lewis Beck, Bruce Bégout, Jocelyn Benoist, Laura Boella, Eugen V. Bohm-Bawerk, Léon Brunschvicg & Mauro Carbone (2009). Buonarroti, Michelangelo 284. In Beatrice Centi & Huemer Wolfgang (eds.), Values and Ontology. Ontos. 293.
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  6. David M. Armstrong (2009). Questions About States of Affairs. In M. Reicher (ed.), States of Affairs. Ontos Verlag. 30--39.
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  7. John Anderson, David Armstrong & Creagh Cole, Front Matter.
    'With this scheme, John Anderson joins a very distinguished line of philosophers who have presented us with a set of categories. We have first Plato (the doctrine of Highest Kinds in his dialogue The Sophist), then Aristotle, Kant, Hegel, and Samuel Alexander.' - D. M. Armstrong, from the introduction. Space, Time and the Categories presents a unique record of personal influence and inspiration over three generations of philosophers in Australia, England and Scotland. This work is a vitally important text in (...)
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  8. David Armstrong (2008). Be Angry and Sin Not" : Philodemus Versus the Stoics on Natural Bites and Natural Emotions. In John T. Fitzgerald (ed.), Passions and Moral Progress in Greco-Roman Thought. Routledge. 79--121.
  9. David Armstrong (2007). First Page Preview. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (4).
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  10. David M. Armstrong (2007). &Quot;how Do Particulars Stand to Universals?&Quot;. In Dean W. Zimmerman (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics. Oup Oxford.
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  11. David M. Armstrong (2006). Minimal Consciousness. In Maureen Eckert (ed.), Theories of Mind: An Introductory Reader. Rowman and Littlefield. 213.
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  12. David Armstrong (2005). Reply to Simons and Mumford. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 83 (2):271 – 276.
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  13. David M. Armstrong (2005). Four Disputes About Properties. Synthese 144 (3):1-12.
    In considering the nature of properties four controversial decisions must be made. (1) Are properties universals or tropes? (2) Are properties attributes of particulars, or are particulars just bundles of properties? (3) Are properties categorical (qualitative) in nature, or are they powers? (4) If a property attaches to a particular, is this predication contingent, or is it necessary? These choices seem to be in a great degree independent of each other. The author indicates his own choices.
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  14. David Armstrong, Combinatorialism Revisited.
    The object of this paper is to argue once again for the combinatorial account of possibility defended in earlier work (Armstrong, 1989, 1997). But there I failed fully to realise the dialectical advantages that accrue once one begins by assuming the hypothesis of logical atomism, the hypothesis that postulates simple particulars and simple universals (properties and relations) at the bottom of the world. Logical atomism is, I incline to think, no better than ‘speculative cosmology’ as opposed to ‘analytic ontology’, to (...)
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  15. David Armstrong (2004). Horace's Epistles 1 and Philodemus. In , Vergil, Philodemus, and the Augustans. University of Texas Press.
     
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  16. David Armstrong (ed.) (2004). Vergil, Philodemus, and the Augustans. University of Texas Press.
    The Epicurean teacher and poet Philodemus of Gadara (c. 110-c. 40/35 BC) exercised significant literary and philosophical influence on Roman writers of the Augustan Age, most notably the poets Vergil and Horace. Yet a modern appreciation for Philodemus' place in Roman intellectual history has had to wait on the decipherment of the charred remains of Philodemus' library, which was buried in Herculaneum by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. As improved texts and translations of Philodemus' writings have become available (...)
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  17. David M. Armstrong (2004). In Defence of the Cognitivist Theory of Perception. Harvard Review of Philosophy 12 (1):19-26.
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  18. David M. Armstrong (2004). Mental Concepts: Casual Analysis. In R. L. Gregory (ed.), The Oxford Companion to the Mind. Oxford University Press. 572--574.
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  19. David M. Armstrong (2004). Théorie combinatoire revue et corrigée. In Jean-Maurice Monnoyer (ed.), La Structure du Monde. Vrin, Paris. 185--198.
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  20. David Armstrong, Jeffrey Fish, Patricia A. Johnston, Marilyn B. Skinner, Luigi Belloni, Lia de Finis, Gabriella Moretti & Antonella Borgo (2004). Acosta-Hughes, Benjamin, Elizabeth Kosmetatou, and Manuel Baumbach, Eds. Labored in Papyrus Leaves: Perspectives on an Epigram Collection Attributed to Posidippus (P. Mil. Vogl. VIII 309). Hellenic Studies 2. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2004. Xiv+ 377 Pp. 4 Black-and-White Figs. Paper, $25. Ando, Clifford, Ed. Roman Religion. Edinburgh Readings on the Ancient World. [REVIEW] American Journal of Philology 125:471-478.
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  21. David Armstrong (2003). Truthmakers for Modal Truths. In Hallvard Lillehammer Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra (ed.), Real Metaphysics: Essays in Honour of D. H. Mellor. Routledge. 12-24.
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  22. David F. Armstrong (2003). Creative Solution to an Old Problem. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):211-212.
    Corballis presents a plausible evolutionary mechanism to explain the tight linkage between cerebral lateralization for language and for handedness in humans. This argument may be bolstered by invoking Stokoe's notion of semantic phonology to explain the role of Broca's area in grammatical functions.
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  23. David M. Armstrong (2003). Resemblance Nominalism: A Solution to the Problem of Universals. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (2):285-286.
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  24. David F. Armstrong (2002). Ethnography Should Replace Experimentation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):620-621.
    This paper points to the need in ape language research to shift from experimentation to ethnography. We cannot determine what goes on inside the head of an ape when it communicates with a human being, but we can learn about the nature and content of the communication that occurs in such face-to-face interaction. This information is fundamental for establishing a baseline for the abilities of an ape-human common ancestor.
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  25. David M. Armstrong (2002). Vérifacteurs pour des vérités modales. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale (2):491-507.
    Revenant sur la question des vérifacteurs, D. Armstrong demande ici d'abord comment concilier le maximalisme (toute vérité a un vérifacteur) et la relation de nécessitation (toute vérité contingente peut servir de vérifacteur pour une vérité nécessaire quelconque). L'A. examine quel sens métaphysique donner à la notion d'implication, et s'il y a un sens à admettre une contingence de re. Il traite à ce niveau des possibilités pures, examine le cas des aliens chez <span class='Hi'>David</span> Lewis, puis pose la question de (...)
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  26. David M. Armstrong (2001). Review of Lewis (1999). [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 110 (1):77-79.
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  27. David M. Armstrong (2000). The 'Thermometer' View of Knowledge. In Sven Bernecker & Fred I. Dretske (eds.), Knowledge: Readings in Contemporary Epistemology. Oup Oxford.
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  28. David Armstrong, Fred Dretske, Alvin Goldman, Robert Nozick & Marshall Swain (2000). Reliabilism and Intellectual Virtue. In Guy Axtell (ed.), Knowledge, Belief, and Character: Readings in Virtue Epistemology. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  29. David M. Armstrong (1999). Reply to Ellis. In Howard Sankey (ed.), Causation and Laws of Nature. Kluwer. 43--48.
  30. David M. Armstrong (1999). The Mind-Body Problem: An Opinionated Introduction. Westview Press.
    The emphasis is always on the arguments used, and the way one position develops from another. By the end of the book the reader is afforded both a grasp of the state of the controversy, and how we got there.
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  31. David M. Armstrong (1999). The Open Door: Counterfactual Versus Singularist Theories of Causation. In Howard Sankey (ed.), Causation and Laws of Nature. Kluwer. 175--185.
  32. David Malet Armstrong (1999). The Causal Theory of Properties: Properties According to Shoemaker, Ellis, and Others. Philosophical Topics 26 (1/2):25-37.
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  33. Hyun-Soo Ahn, Lilli Alanen, Raphael Cohen Almagor, David M. Armstrong, Rudolph Bernet, Paul Blum, Miles Burnyeat, Alan Carter, Neus Torbisco Casals & Roberto Casati (1998). Visiting Professors From Abroad, 1998-99. Review of Metaphysics 52:249-257.
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  34. David M. Armstrong (1996). Dispositions as Categorical States. In Tim Crane (ed.), Dispositions: A Debate. New York: Routledge. 15--18.
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  35. David M. Armstrong (1996). Qualia Ain't in the Head. Psyche 2:31--4.
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  36. David M. Armstrong (1995). Reacting to Meinong. Grazer Philosophische Studien 50:615-627.
    1. Some reasons are given for rejecting the view that there are entities that do not exist. 2. It is suggested, nevertheless, that this view has some plausibility when we consider unrealized empirical possibilities. 3. Even if non-existent entities are rejected, there remains Meinong's distinction between object and objectives, roughly: things and facts. The author would analyze objects in terms of objectives, yielding a world of facts.
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  37. David Armstrong, Rae Langton, Robert Audi, Jerrold Levinson, John Bacon, David Lewis, Rick Benitez, Gary Malinas, John Biro & Jeff Malpas (1995). The Editor and the Associate Editors Thank the Consulting Editors, the Members of the Editorial Board and the Following Philosophers for Their Help with Refereeing Papers During the Period July 1994 to June 1995. Adeney, Douglas Kennett, Jeanette Agar, Nicholas Lamarque, Peter. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (4).
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  38. David Armstrong (1993). The Medical Division of Labor. In Ellen Messer-Davidow, David R. Shumway & David Sylvan (eds.), Knowledges: Historical and Critical Studies in Disciplinarity. University Press of Virginia.
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  39. David M. Armstrong (1993). Priroda Duha. Theoria 36 (3-4):69-80.
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  40. David M. Armstrong (1993). Reply to Campbell. In John Bacon, Keith Campbell & Lloyd Reinhardt (eds.), Ontology, Causality and Mind: Essays in Honour of D M Armstrong. New York: Cambridge University Press.
     
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  41. David M. Armstrong (1993). Reply to Jackson's "Block's Challenge". In John Bacon, Keith Campbell & Lloyd Reinhardt (eds.), Ontology, Causality and Mind: Essays in Honour of D.M. Armstrong. New York: Cambridge University Press.
     
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  42. David Armstrong (1992). Francis Snare 1943-1990. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 65 (5):81 - 83.
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  43. David M. Armstrong (1992). Properties. In Kevin Mulligan (ed.), Language, Truth and Ontology. Kluwer. 14--27.
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  44. David M. Armstrong (1991). Intentionality, Perception, and Causality. In John Searle and His Critics. Cambridge: Blackwell.
     
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  45. David M. Armstrong (1991). John Searle and His Critics. Cambridge: Blackwell.
     
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  46. David M. Armstrong (1991). Searle's Neo-Cartesian Theory of Consciousness. Philosophical Issues 1:67-71.
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  47. David Malet Armstrong (1991). What Makes Induction Rational? Dialogue 30 (04):503-11.
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  48. David G. Armstrong, Margaret V. Yonemura, Patricia M. Lines, Joe L. Kincheloe, Gary K. Clabaugh, Svi Shapiro, Robert M. Hendrickson, Richard Smith & Glenn Dawes (1990). Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW] Educational Studies 21 (2):1-35.
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  49. David Malet Armstrong (1989). C. B. Martin, Counterfactuals, Causality and Conditionals. In J. Heil (ed.), Cause, Mind and Reality; Essays Honoring C. B. Martin. Kluwer. 7-15.
     
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  50. David Armstrong (1988). List of Conference Participants. In C. Wright & P. Clark (eds.), Mind, Psychoanalysis, and Science. Blackwell. 359.
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