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David Basinger [69]David William Basinger [1]
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  1.  13
    Clark Pinnock, Richard Rice, John Sanders, William Hasker & David Basinger (1994). The Openness of God: A Biblical Challenge to the Traditional Understanding of God. Downers Grove: Intervarsity Press.
    Written by five scholars whose expertise extends across the disciplines of biblical, historical, systematic, and philosophical theology, this is a careful and ...
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  2.  2
    David Basinger (2002). Religious Diversity: A Philosophical Assessment. Ashgate.
  3. Michael Peterson, William Hasker, Bruce Reichenbach & David Basinger (2008). Reason and Religious Belief: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. OUP USA.
    What is the status of belief in God? Must a rational case be made or can such belief be properly basic? Is it possible to reconcile the concept of a good God with evil and suffering? In light of great differences among religions, can only one religion be true? The most comprehensive work of its kind, Reason and Religious Belief, now in its fourth edition, explores these and other perennial questions in the philosophy of religion. Drawing from the best in (...)
     
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  4.  1
    David Basinger (2011). I What is a Miracle? In Graham H. Twelftree (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Miracles. Cambridge Up 19.
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  5.  11
    David Basinger (1982). Anderson on Plantinga. Philosophy Research Archives 8:315-320.
    In a recent discussion, Susan Anderson argues that Alvin Plantinga’s version of the Free Will Defense has not shown that the existence of God is neither precluded nor rendered improbable by the existence of evil. She grants Plantinga that God cannot control free actions and that only free actions have moral worth but denies that this entails that God cannot insure a world containing only moral good. God could do so, she argues, simply by taking away the freedom of persons (...)
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  6.  12
    David Basinger (2014). Religious Diversity (Pluralism). Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy:1.
    With respect to many, if not most issues, there exist significant differences of opinion among individuals who seem to be equally knowledgeable and sincere. Individuals who apparently have access to the same information and are equally interested in the truth affirm incompatible perspectives on, for instance, significant social, political, and economic issues. Such diversity of opinion, though, is nowhere more evident than in the area of religious thought. On almost every religious issue, honest, knowledgeable people hold significantly diverse, often incompatible (...)
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  7.  20
    David Basinger (1990). Miracles as Evidence for Theism. Sophia 29 (1):56 - 59.
    In an ongoing dialogue, Robert Larmer and I have been discussing whether the undisputed occurrence of certain conceivable events would require all honest, thoughtful individuals to acknowledge that God has intervened in earthly affairs. I argue that there is no reason to believe that a nontheist who acknowledged certain healings to be strong evidence for theism but did not see such evidence as outweighing what she viewed as the stronger counterevidence, and thus remained a nontheist, could justifiably be accused of (...)
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  8.  16
    David Basinger (1984). Miracles as Violations: Some Clarifications. Southern Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):1-7.
    SINCE THE TIME OF HUME, A MIRACLE HAS MOST FREQUENTLY BEEN DEFINED IN PHILOSOPHICAL CIRCLES AS A VIOLATION OF A NATURAL LAW CAUSED BY A GOD. I ARGUE THAT THERE IS A MEANINGFUL SENSE IN WHICH IT CAN BE SAID THAT A NATURAL LAW HAS BEEN VIOLATED. BUT I FURTHER ARGUE THAT SINCE AN EVENT CAN ONLY BE A VIOLATION IN THIS SENSE IF IT IS NOT CAUSED BY A GOD, NO MIRACLE CAN BE SAID TO BE A VIOLATION OF (...)
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  9.  57
    David Basinger (1991). Middle Knowledge and Divine Control: Some Clarifications. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 30 (3):129 - 139.
    What then have we discovered? The general issue under discussion, remember, is whether it is advantageous or disadvantageous for the theist to affirm MK, especially as this form of knowledge relates to God's control over earthly affairs. As we have seen, both proponents and opponents of MK have claimed that this form of knowledge gives God significant power over earthly affairs, including control over the (indeterministically) free choices of humans.We have seen, though, that such a contention is dubious. There are (...)
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  10.  48
    David Basinger (1988). Hick's Religious Pluralism and “Reformed Epistemology”. Faith and Philosophy 5 (4):421-432.
    The purpose of this discussion is to analyze comparatively the influential argument for religious pluralism offered by John Hick and the argument for religious exclusivism (sectarianism) which can be generated by proponents of what has come to be labeled ‘Reformed Epistemology.’ I argue that while Hick and the Reformed exclusivist appear to be giving us incompatible responses to the same question about the true nature of ‘religious’ reality, they are actually responding to related, but distinct questions, each of which must (...)
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  11.  2
    David Basinger & Randall Basinger (1981). Divine Omnipotence: Plantinga Vs. Griffin. Process Studies 11 (1):11-24.
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  12.  3
    David Basinger (1993). Evil Revisited. Faith and Philosophy 10 (2):275-279.
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  13.  62
    David Basinger (1983). In What Sense Must God Be Omnibenevolent? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 14 (1):3 - 15.
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  14.  11
    David Basinger (1980). Must God Create the Best Possible World? International Philosophical Quarterly 20 (3):339-341.
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  15.  33
    David Basinger (1987). Evil and a Finite God. Philosophy Research Archives 13:285-287.
    P.J. McGrath has recently challenged the standard claim that to escape the problem of evil one need only alter one’s conception of God by limiting his power or his goodness. If we assume that God is infinitely good but not omnipotent, then God can scarcely be a proper object of worship. And if we assume that if God is omnipotent but limited in goodness, he becomes a moral monster. Either way evil remains a problem for theistic belief. I argue that (...)
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  16.  2
    David Basinger (1988). Alvin Plantinga. Edited by James D. Tomberlin and Peter van Inwagen. Modern Schoolman 65 (4):265-267.
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  17.  12
    David Basinger (1995). Miracles, Evil and Justified Belief: Further Clarification. Sophia 34 (2):58 - 62.
    In an ongoing dialogue, Robert Larmer and I have been discussing whether the undisputed occurrence of certain conceivable events--for instance, astonishing healings--could require all honest, thoughtful individuals to acknowledge that God has supernaturally intervened in earthly affairs. I have not denied that a theist could justifiably consider the occurrence of certain possible (or even actual) events to be strong evidence for theism. But in this essay I continue to deny that the occurrence of any conceivable event would require the acknowledgement (...)
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  18.  11
    David Basinger (1995). Petitionary Prayer: A Response to Murray and Meyers. Religious Studies 31 (4):475 - 484.
    In a recent article in this journal, Michael Murray and Kurt Meyers offer us (among other things) two innovative and thought-provoking responses to the important question of why God would, even occasionally, refrain from giving us that which he can and would like to give us until we request that he do so: to help the believer learn more about God and thus become more like him and to help the believer realize she is dependent on God. I argue (...)
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  19.  49
    David Basinger (1982). Divine Omniscience and the Best of All Possible Worlds. Journal of Value Inquiry 16 (2):143-148.
  20.  28
    David Basinger (1992). Feminism and Epistemology. Journal of Philosophical Research 17:29-37.
    There have been many calls recently for philosophers to rethink what philosophy is and how it should be practiced. Among the most vocal critics is an influential group of feminist philosophers who argue that since current philosophical activity is based primarily on a conception of reason that is both inherently inadequate and oppressive to women, it is imperative that our understanding of the nature and practice of philosophy be significantly modified. I argue that this criticism is fundamentally misguided. Specifically, it (...)
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  21.  27
    David Basinger (1987). Middle Knowledge and Human Freedom. Faith and Philosophy 4 (3):330-336.
    The concept of middle knowledge---God’s knowledge of what would in fact happen in every conceivable situation---is just beginning to receive the attention it deserves, For example, it is just now becoming clear to many that classical theism requires the affirmation of middle knowledge. But this concept is also coming under increasing criticism. The most significant of these, I believe, has been developed in a recent discussion by William Hasker, in which he argues that the concept of a true counterfactual of (...)
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  22.  5
    David Basinger (1987). Miracles and Natural Explanations. Sophia 26 (3):22 - 26.
    IN A RECENT DISCUSSION ON THE MIRACULOUS, ROBERT LARMER ARGUES THAT THERE ARE CONCEIVABLE OCCURRENCES FOR WHICH IT WOULD BE MOST REASONABLE TO BELIEVE NO NATURAL EXPLANATION WILL BE FORTHCOMING. IN RESPONSE I ARGUE THAT THERE ARE NO SUCH OCCURRENCES. IT IS, IN PRINCIPLE, ALWAYS JUSTIFIABLE TO MAINTAIN THAT ANY CONCEIVABLE EVENT IS THE PRODUCT OF SOLELY NATURAL CAUSAL FACTORS.
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  23.  9
    David Basinger (1981). Evil As Evidence Against God's Existence. Modern Schoolman 58 (3):175-184.
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  24.  45
    David Basinger (1986). Omniscience and Deliberation: A Response to Reichenbach. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 20 (2/3):169 - 172.
  25.  8
    David Basinger (1984). The Concept of God. International Philosophical Quarterly 24 (2):203-205.
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  26.  13
    David Basinger (1986). Middle Knowledge and Classical Christian Thought. Religious Studies 22 (3/4):407 - 422.
    To say that God is omniscient, most philosophers and theologians agree, is to say that he knows all true propositions and none that are false. But there is a great deal of disagreement about what is knowable. Some believe that God's knowledge is limited to everything that is actual and that which will follow deterministically from it. He knows, for example, exactly what Caesar was thinking when he crossed the Rubicon and how many horses he had in his army that (...)
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  27.  12
    David Basinger (1984). Divine Omniscience and Human Freedom. Faith and Philosophy 1 (3):291-302.
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  28.  23
    David Basinger (1996). Pluralism and Justified Religious Belief. Faith and Philosophy 13 (2):260-265.
    I have argued previously (in this journal) that the reality of pervasive religious pluralism obligates a believer to attempt to establish her perspective as the correct one. In a recent response, Jerome Gellman maintains that the believer who affirms a ‘religious epistemology’ is under no such obligation in that she need not subject her religious beliefs to any ‘rule of rationality’. In this paper I contend that there do exist some rules of rationality (some epistemic obligations) that must be acknowledged-and (...)
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  29.  38
    David Basinger (1999). The Challenge of Religious Diversity: A Middle Ground. Sophia 38 (1):41-53.
    So where does all this leave us? The reality of religious diversity, I have argued, does notnecessitate the rejection of exclusivism. But this does not end the discussion, as some apparently believe. The reality of religious diversity, I have also argued, does justifiably remainfor many a significant challenge to exclusivistic thought and practice.
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  30. David Basinger (1986). Philosophy and Miracle the Contemporary Debate. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  31.  36
    David Basinger (2000). Religious Diversity: Where Exclusivists Often Go Wrong. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 47 (1):43-55.
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  32.  15
    David Basinger (1991). Process Theism Versus Free-Will Theism. Process Studies 20 (4):204-220.
  33.  21
    David Basinger (1983). Why Petition an Omnipotent, Omniscient, Wholly Good God? Religious Studies 19 (1):25 - 41.
    Orthodox Christian theists frequently petition God in the sense that they ask him to bring about some state of affairs which they believe may not occur without divine intervention. Such petitions basically fall into three categories: requests in which the petitioner is asking God to influence significantly the natural environment – e.g. calm a hurricane, requests in which the petitioner is asking God to influence significantly the lives ofother individuals – e.g. reconcile the broken marriage of friends, and requests in (...)
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  34.  16
    David Basinger (1991). Plantinga, Pluralism and Justified Religious Belief. Faith and Philosophy 8 (1):67-80.
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  35.  23
    David Basinger (1980). Christian Theism and the Concept of Miracle: Some Epistemological Perplexities. Southern Journal of Philosophy 18 (2):137-150.
    MANY ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN THEISTS CLAIM THAT THEY HAVE IDENTIFIED (OR AT LEAST HAVE THE CAPACITY TO IDENTIFY) OBSERVABLE PHENOMENA AS MIRACULOUS. I ARGUE THAT, ALTHOUGH THE CHRISTIAN THEIST CAN SUCCESSFULLY CIRCUMVENT THE STANDARD HUMEAN EPISTEMOLOGICAL BARRIER, HE CAN STIPULATE NO OBJECTIVE CRITERIA FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF A MIRACULOUS OCCURRENCE, EVEN IF IT IS GRANTED THAT THE CHRISTIAN GOD EXISTS AND THAT THE CHRISTIAN CANON ACCURATELY DESCRIBES HOW THIS BEING RELATES TO OUR PHYSICAL UNIVERSE. I CONCLUDE, ACCORDINGLY, THAT ’MIRACLE’ MUST NECESSARILY (...)
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  36.  6
    David Basinger (1989). Process-Relational Christian Soteriology. Process Studies 18 (2):114-117.
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  37.  12
    David Basinger (1984). Griffin and Pike on Divine Power. Philosophy Research Archives 10:347-352.
    David Griffin and Nelson Pike recently had a spirited discussion on divine power. The essence of the discussion centered around what was labelled Premise X: “It is possible for one actual being's condition to be completely determined by a being or beings other than itself.” Pike maintains that ‘traditional’ theists have affirmed Premise X but denies that this entails that God has all the power there is and thus denies that Premise X can be considered incoherent for this reason. Griffin (...)
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  38.  15
    David Basinger (1992). Divine Omniscience and the Soteriological Problem of Evil Is the Type of Knowledge God Possesses Relevant? Religious Studies 28 (1):1 - 18.
    The problem of evil normally discussed in philosophical theology is concerned with the pain and suffering experienced in this life . Why do so many innocent children die slow, torturous deaths as the result of disease, famine or earthquakes? Why do so many seemingly innocent adults suffer as the result of the greed, indifference or perversity of others? If God is all-good, then he certainly does not want such suffering. If God is all-powerful, he should be able to do away (...)
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  39.  5
    David Basinger (1990). Logical Positivism in Perspective. Edited by Barry Gower. Modern Schoolman 67 (2):163-164.
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  40.  15
    David Basinger (1985). In What Sense Must God Do His Best: A Response to Hasker. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 18 (3):161 - 164.
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  41.  4
    David Basinger (1983). Flew, Miracles and History. Sophia 22 (2):15 - 22.
    ANTONY FLEW HAS ARGUED THAT THE HISTORIAN MUST MAINTAIN WITH RESPECT TO ANY ALLEGED MIRACLE WHICH IS INCOMPATIBLE WITH CURRENT NOMOLOGICALS THAT THE EVENT DID NOT IN FACT OCCUR AS REPORTED. I ARGUE THAT THE LINE OF REASONING HE USES TO SUPPORT THIS STANCE IS MUCH MORE SUBTLE AND CONVINCING THAN MOST OF HIS CRITICS HAVE ACKNOWLEDGED. BUT I CONCLUDE IN THE LAST ANALYSIS THAT HIS ARGUMENT IS UNSOUND.
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  42.  2
    David Basinger & Human Freedom (2011). Bibliography: Recent Work on Molinism. In Ken Perszyk (ed.), Molinism: The Contemporary Debate. OUP Oxford 1--303.
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  43.  10
    David Basinger (1993). ``Simple Foreknowledge and Providential Control&Quot. Faith and Philosophy 10 (3):421-427.
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  44.  9
    David Basinger & Randall Basinger (1981). Divine Omnipotence. Process Studies 11 (1):11-24.
  45.  10
    David Basinger & Randall Basinger (1982). Divine Determinateness and the Free Will Defense. Philosophy Research Archives 8:531-534.
    Proponents of The Free Will Defense frequently argue that it is necessary for God to create self-directing beings who possess the capacity for producing evil because, in the words of F.R. Tennant, “moral goodness must be the result of a self-directing developmental process.” But if this is true, David Paulsen has recently argued, then the proponent of the Free Will Defense cannot claim that God has an eternally determinate nature. For if God has an eternally determinatenature and moral goodness must (...)
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  46.  8
    David Basinger (1990). Water Into Wine? Faith and Philosophy 7 (3):369-371.
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  47.  10
    David Basinger (1979). Human Freedom and Divine Providence: Some New Thoughts on an Old Problem. Religious Studies 15 (4):491 - 510.
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  48.  5
    David Basinger (1993). The Dilemma of Freedom and Foreknowledge. Review of Metaphysics 47 (1):171-172.
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  49.  6
    David Basinger (1986). Human Coercion. Process Studies 15 (3):161-171.
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  50.  7
    David Basinger (2010). God, Evil, and Design. Faith and Philosophy 27 (4):474-477.
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