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  1. David Benatar (forthcoming). Creation Ethics: Reproduction, Genetics, and the Quality of Life, by David DeGrazia. Mind:fzu071.
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  2. David Benatar (forthcoming). Two Views of Sexual Ethics: Promiscuity Pedophilia, and Rape. Public Affairs Quarterly.
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  3. David Benatar (2014). Christine Overall: Why Have Children? The Ethical Debate. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (3):583-585.
    The prevailing view about procreation, Christine Overall observes, is that “having children is the default position; not having children is what requires explanation and justification” (p. 3). These assumptions, she says, “are the opposite of what they ought to be” and that the “burden of proof … should rest primarily on those who choose to have children” (ibid). The ostensible goal of Why Have Children? is to discuss when this burden is and is not met.Professor Overall’s conclusions are much less (...)
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  4. David Benatar (2013). Evaluations of Circumcision Should Be Circumscribed by the Evidence. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (7):431-432.
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  5. David Benatar (2013). Pedophilia. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  6. David Benatar (2013). Still Better Never to Have Been: A Reply to (More of) My Critics. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 17 (1-2):121-151.
    In Better Never to Have Been: The Harm of Coming into Existence, I argued that coming into existence is always a harm and that procreation is wrong. In this paper, I respond to those of my critics to whom I have not previously responded. More specifically, I engage the objections of Tim Bayne, Ben Bradley, Campbell Brown, David DeGrazia, Elizabeth Harman, Chris Kaposy, Joseph Packer and Saul Smilansky.
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  7. David Benatar (2013). There's No Method in the Badness. Bioethics 27 (3):174-174.
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  8. David Benatar (2012). A First Name Basis?–Erratum. Think 11 (30):115-115.
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  9. David Benatar (2012). How Does Anybody Live in This Strange Place? A Reply to Samantha Vice. South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (4):619-361.
    This article builds on Samantha Vice’s argument on the problem of whiteness in contemporary South Africa. I will explore the thesis of invisibility regarding whiteness and argue for its relevance to the rich per se. This thesis demonstrates how white privilege and affluence, despite being glaringly visible in a concrete sense, is rendered invisible together with the mostly black poverty by which it is contrasted. The invisibility of whiteness translates and flows into the so-called ‘invisibility of richness’, which involves anyone (...)
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  10. David Benatar (2012). Second Sexism. The Philosophers' Magazine 58:19-20.
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  11. David Benatar (2012). The Second Sexism: Discrimination Against Men and Boys. Wiley-Blackwell.
    In this book, philosophy professor David Benatar provides details of these and other examples of what he calls the “second sexism.” He discusses what sexism is, responds to the objections of those who would deny that there is a second ...
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  12. David Benatar (2011). A First Name Basis? Think 10 (29):51-57.
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  13. David Benatar (2011). Choosing Tomorrow's Children. Social Theory and Practice 37 (3):524-530.
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  14. David Benatar (2011). No Life is Good. The Philosophers' Magazine 53 (53):62-66.
    The worst pains seem to be worse than the best pleasures are good. Anybody who doubts this should consider what choice they would make if they wereoffered the option of securing an hour of the most sublime pleasures possible in exchange for suffering an hour of the worst pain possible.
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  15. David Benatar (2011). The Owl and the Ostrich: Reply to Sami Pihlström on Ethical Unthinkabilities and Philosophical Seriousness. Metaphilosophy 42 (5):605-616.
    Sami Pihlström argues in his “Ethical Unthinkabilities and Philosophical Seriousness” that there are some philosophical views that are so dangerous that we should not discuss them. He advances this argument with special reference to my (anti-natalist) view that being brought into existence is always a serious harm. In response I argue: (a) that there are major flaws in his argument for the conclusion that we should not think about (purportedly) unthinkable views; and (b) that my views about the harm of (...)
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  16. Andrew Altman, Michael Barnhart, Avner Baz, David Benatar, Yitzhak Benbaji, Talia Bettcher, Brian Bix, Jeffrey Bland-Ballard & Lene Bomann-Larsen (2010). Referees for Volume 7. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7:541-542.
     
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  17. David Archard & David Benatar (eds.) (2010). Procreation and Parenthood: The Ethics of Bearing and Rearing Children. Oxford University Press.
    Procreation and Parenthood offers new and original essays by leading philosophers on some of the main ethical issues raised by these activities.
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  18. David Benatar (ed.) (2010). Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions, 2nd Edition. Rowman & Littlefield.
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  19. David Benatar (2010). The Limits of Reproductive Freedom. In David Archard & David Benatar (eds.), Procreation and Parenthood: The Ethics of Bearing and Rearing Children. Oup Oxford.
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  20. David Benatar (ed.) (2009). Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc..
    Introduction -- Part I: The meaning of life -- Richard Taylor, The meaning of life -- Thomas Nagel, The absurd -- Richard Hare, Nothing matters -- W.D. Joske, Philosophy and the meaning of life -- Robert Nozick, Philosophy and the meaning of life -- David Schmidtz, The meanings of life -- Part II: Creating people -- Derek Parfit, Whether causing someone to exist can benefit this person -- John Leslie, Why not let life ecome extinct? -- James Lenman, On becoming (...)
     
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  21. David Benatar (2008). Cartoons and Consequences. Think 6 (17-18):53-57.
    Philosophical debate over the infamous Danish cartoons of Muhammad continues.
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  22. David Benatar (2008). Non-Therapeutic Pediatric Interventions. In Peter A. Singer & A. M. Viens (eds.), The Cambridge Textbook of Bioethics. Cambridge University Press.
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  23. David Benatar (2008). The Optimism Delusion. Think 6 (16):19-22.
    In the first of our three pieces responding to Richard Dawkins's The God Delusion, David Benatar suggests that Dawkins is preaching.
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  24. Peter C. Adamson, Carmen Paradis, Martin L. Smith, Nicholas Agar, Jacob M. Appel, David Benatar, Nancy Berlinger, Daniel Brudney, Lucy M. Candib & Arthur L. Caplan (2007). Following is the Comprehensive Index for Volume 37 of the Hastings Center Report, Covering All Feature Material From 2007. Letters Have Not Been Included. Ffl Complete Issues Are Available for Volume 37 (2007) and May Be Purchased for $16.00 Each, Plus Shipping. Please Contact the Circulation Department, The Hastings Center, 21 Malcolm Gordon Road, Garrison, NY 10524; Tel.:(845) 424-4040; Fax:(845) 424-4545; E-Mail: Publications@ Thehastingscenter. Org. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 37.
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  25. David Benatar (2007). Jonathan Glover, Choosing Children: The Ethical Dilemmas of Genetic Intervention. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (2):227-228.
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  26. David Benatar (2007). Unscientific Ethics: Science and Selective Ethics. Hastings Center Report 37 (1):30-32.
  27. David Benatar, Cheshire Calhoun, Louise Collins, John Corvino, Yolanda Estes, John Finnis, Deirdre Golash, Alan Goldman, Greta Christina, Raja Halwani, Christopher Hamilton, Eva Feder Kittay, Howard Klepper, Andrew Koppelman, Stanley Kurtz, Thomas Mappes, Joan Mason-Grant, Janice Moulton, Thomas Nagel, Jerome Neu, Martha Nussbaum, Alan Soble, Sallie Tisdale, Alan Wertheimer, Robin West & Karol Wojtyla (2007). Philosophy of Sex: Contemporary Readings. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  28. David Benatar (2006). A Storm in a Turban. Think 5 (13):17-22.
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  29. David Benatar (2006). Better Never to Have Been: The Harm of Coming Into Existence. New York ;Oxford University Press.
    Better Never to Have Been argues for a number of related, highly provocative, views: (1) Coming into existence is always a serious harm. (2) It is always wrong to have children. (3) It is wrong not to abort fetuses at the earlier stages of gestation. (4) It would be better if, as a result of there being no new people, humanity became extinct. These views may sound unbelievable--but anyone who reads Benatar will be obliged to take them seriously.
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  30. David Benatar (2006). What's God Got to Do with It? Atheism and Religious Practice. Ratio 19 (4):383–400.
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  31. David Benatar (2005). Sexist Language: Alternatives to the Alternatives. Public Affairs Quarterly 19 (1):1-9.
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  32. David Benatar (2005). The Trouble with Universal Declarations. Developing World Bioethics 5 (3):220–224.
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  33. David Benatar (2003). The Second Sexism. Social Theory and Practice 29 (2):177-210.
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  34. David Benatar (2003). The Second Sexism, a Second Time. Social Theory and Practice 29 (2):275-296.
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  35. David Benatar & Michael Benatar (2003). 3: 2 Target Article Authors Respond to Commentators. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (2).
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  36. David Benatar & Michael Benatar (2003). 3:2 Target Article Authors Respond to Commentators: How Not to Argue About Circumcision. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (2):1 – 9.
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  37. Michael Benatar & David Benatar (2003). Between Prophylaxis and Child Abuse: The Ethics of Neonatal Male Circumcision. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (2):35-48.
    Opinion about neonatal male circumcision is deeply divided. Some take it to be a prophylactic measure with unequivocal and significant health benefits, while others consider it a form of child abuse. We argue against both these polar views. In doing so, we discuss whether circumcision constitutes bodily mutilation, whether the absence of the child's informed consent makes it wrong, the nature and strength of the evidence regarding medical harms and benefits, and what moral weight cultural considerations have. We conclude that (...)
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  38. David Benatar (2001). To Be or Not to Have Been? International Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (2):255-266.
    Most people think that their coming into existence benefited them. This paper reports on and analyses a study that shows that most people, when making such a judgement, do not really consider the counterfactual case -- the scenario in which they never come into existence. Because proper consideration is not given to both options, the ranking of one over the other is not an appropriately informed judgement. The preference for having come into existence is thus a profoundly unreliable indicator of (...)
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  39. David Benatar (2001). Why the Naïve Argument Against Moral Vegetarianism Really is Naïve. Environmental Values 10 (1):103 - 112.
    When presented with the claim of the moral vegetarian that it is wrong for us to eat meat, many people respond that because it is not wrong for lions, tigers and other carnivores to kill and eat animals, it cannot be wrong for humans to do so. This response is what Peter Alward has called the naive argument. Peter Alward has defended the naive argument against objections. I argue that his defence fails.
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  40. David Benatar & Michael Benatar (2001). A Pain in the Fetus: Toward Ending Confusion About Fetal Pain. Bioethics 15 (1):57–76.
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  41. David Benatar (2000). The Wrong of Wrongful Life. American Philosophical Quarterly 37 (2):175 - 183.
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  42. David Benatar (1999). Prejudice in Jest: When Racial and Gender Humor Harms. Public Affairs Quarterly 13 (2):191-203.
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  43. David Benatar (1999). The Unbearable Lightness of Bringing Into Being. Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (2):173–180.
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  44. David Benatar (1999). Hugh LaFollette and Niall Shanks, Brute Science: Dilemmas of Animal Experimentation:Brute Science: Dilemmas of Animal Experimentation. Ethics 110 (1):207-211.
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  45. David Benatar (1998). Corporal Punishment. Social Theory and Practice 24 (2):237-260.
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  46. David Benatar (1997). Why It Is Better Never to Come Into Existence. American Philosophical Quarterly 34 (3):345 - 355.
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