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David Bohm [73]David Joseph Bohm [1]David J. Bohm [1]
  1.  33
    David Bohm (1980/2002). Wholeness and the Implicate Order. Routledge.
    In this classic work David Bohm, writing clearly and without technical jargon, develops a theory of quantum physics which treats the totality of existence as an unbroken whole.
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  2.  82
    David Bohm (1993). The Undivided Universe: An Ontological Interpretation of Quantum Theory. Routledge.
    In the The Undivided Universe, David Bohn and Basil Hiley present a radically different approach to quantum theory.
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  3. David Bohm & F. David Peat (2010). Science, Order and Creativity. Routledge.
    One of the foremost scientists and thinkers of our time, David Bohm worked alongside Oppenheimer and Einstein. In Science, Order and Creativity he and physicist F. David Peat propose a return to greater creativity and communication in the sciences. They ask for a renewed emphasis on ideas rather than formulae, on the whole rather than fragments, and on meaning rather than mere mechanics. Tracing the history of science from Aristotle to Einstein, from the Pythagorean theorem to quantum mechanics, the authors (...)
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  4. David Bohm (1952). A Suggested Interpretation of the Quantum Theory in Terms of ‘Hidden’ Variables, I and II. Physical Review (85):166-193.
  5. David J. Bohm (1986). A New Theory of the Relationship of Mind and Matter. Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research 80 (2 & 3):113-35.
    The relationship of mind and matter is approached in a new way in this article. This approach is based on the causal interpretation of the quantum theory, in which an electron, for example, is regarded as an inseparable union of a particle and afield. This field has, however, some new properties that can be seen to be the main sources of the differences between the quantum theory and the classical (Newtonian) theory. These new properties suggest that the field may be (...)
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  6.  4
    David Bohm (1996). On Dialogue. Routledge.
    Never before has there been a greater need for deeper listening and more open communication to cope with the complex problems facing our organizations, businesses and societies. Renowned scientist David Bohm believed there was a better way for humanity to discover meaning and to achieve harmony. He identified creative dialogue, a sharing of assumptions and understanding, as a means by which the individual, and society as a whole, can learn more about themselves and others, and achieve a renewed sense of (...)
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  7.  58
    David Bohm (1957/1999). Causality and Chance in Modern Physics. University of Pennsylvania Press.
    CHAPTER ONE Causality and Chance in Natural Law. INTRODUCTION IN nature nothing remains constant. Everything is in a perpetual state of transformation, ...
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  8. David Bohm & Basil J. Hiley (2006). The Undivided Universe: An Ontological Interpretation of Quantum Theory. Routledge.
    First published in 1995. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  9.  23
    David Bohm (1965). The Special Theory of Relativity. New York, W.A. Benjamin.
    With clarity and grace, he also reveals the limited truth of some of the "common sense" assumptions which make it difficult for us to appreciate its full ...
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  10. David Bohm (2005). Wholeness and the Implicate Order. Routledge.
    David Bohm was one of the foremost scientific thinkers and philosophers of our time. Although deeply influenced by Einstein, he was also, more unusually for a scientist, inspired by mysticism. Indeed, in the 1970s and 1980s he made contact with both J. Krishnamurti and the Dalai Lama whose teachings helped shape his work. In both science and philosophy, Bohm's main concern was with understanding the nature of reality in general and of consciousness in particular. In this classic work he develops (...)
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  11.  53
    David Bohm (ed.) (1992/1994). Thought as a System. Routledge.
    In Thought as a System , best-selling author David Bohm takes as his subject the role of thought and knowledge at every level of human affairs, from our private reflections on personal identity to our collective efforts to fashion a tolerable civilization. Elaborating upon principles of the relationship between mind and matter first put forward in Wholeness and the Implicate Order , Professor Bohm rejects the notion that our thinking processes neutrally report on what is `out there' in an objective (...)
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  12.  70
    David Bohm (1990). A New Theory of the Relationship of Mind and Matter. Philosophical Psychology 3 (2 & 3):271 – 286.
    The relationship of mind and matter is approached in a new way in this article. This approach is based on the causal interpretation of the quantum theory, in which an electron, for example, is regarded as an inseparable union of a particle and afield. This field has, however, some new properties that can be seen to be the main sources of the differences between the quantum theory and the classical (Newtonian) theory. These new properties suggest (...)
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  13. David Bohm (1996). Wholeness and the Implicate Order. Routledge.
    In his classic work, _Wholeness and the Implicate Order_, David Bohm develops a theory of quantum physics which treats the totality of existence, including matter and consciousness, as an unbroken whole. David Bohm presents a rational and scientific theory which explains cosmology and the nature of reality; written clearly, and without the use of technical jargon, it is essential reading for those interested in physics, philosophy, psychology and the connection between consciousness and matter. David Bohm was one of the foremost (...)
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  14. David Bohm (1962). Classical and Non-Classical Concepts in the Quantum Theory. An Answer to Heisenberg's Physics and Philosophy. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 12 (48):265-280.
  15.  80
    David Bohm (1985). Fragmentation and Wholeness in Religion and in Science. Zygon 20 (2):125-133.
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  16.  10
    David Bohm (1973). Quantum Theory as an Indication of a New Order in Physics. B. Implicate and Explicate Order in Physical Law. Foundations of Physics 3 (2):139-168.
    In this paper, we inquire further into the question of the emergence of new orders in physics, first raised in an earlier paper. In this inquiry, we are led to suggest that the quantum theory indicates the need for yet another new order, which we call “enfolded” or “implicate.” One of the most striking examples of the implicate order is to be seen by considering the function of the hologram, which clearly reveals how a total content (in principle extending over (...)
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  17. David Bohm (1977). Part Two: Mind and Order. In John B. Cobb & David Ray Griffin (eds.), Mind in Nature. University Press of America 37.
     
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  18.  86
    David Bohm (1996/2004). On Creativity. Routledge.
    Creativity is fundamental to human experience. In On Creativity David Bohm, the world-renowned scientist, investigates the phenomenon from all sides. This is a remarkable and life-affirming book by one of the most far-sighted thinkers of modern.
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  19.  36
    David Bohm (1985). Unfolding Meaning: A Weekend of Dialogue with David Bohm. Foundation House.
    David Bohm argues that our fragmented, mechanistic notion of order permeates not only modern science and technology today, but also has profound implications ...
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  20.  63
    David Bohm (1961). On the Relationship Between Methodology in Scientific Research and the Content of Scientific Knowledge. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 12 (46):103-116.
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  21.  13
    David Bohm (1987). The Implicate Order and Prigogine's Notions of Irreversibility. Foundations of Physics 17 (7):667-677.
    In this paper, a very close relationship between Prigogine's notions of irreversibility and the implicate order is brought out. Certain of Prigogine's basic assumptions with regard to irreversible processes are also shown to be the equivalent of the introduction of nilpotent operators in the algebra underlying the implicate order.
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  22. J. Krishnamurti & David Bohm (1985). The Ending of Time.
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  23. David Bohm (1984). Causality and Chance in Modern Physics. Routledge.
    In this classic, David Bohm was the first to offer us his causal interpretation of the quantum theory. _Causality and Chance in Modern Physics_ continues to make possible further insight into the meaning of the quantum theory and to suggest ways of extending the theory into new directions.
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  24.  30
    David Bohm (1962). Classical and Non-Classical Concepts in the Quantum Theory. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 12 (48):265-280.
  25.  24
    David Bohm (1985). Hidden Variables and the Implicate Order. Zygon 20 (2):111-124.
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  26.  17
    David Bohm & Dean R. Fowler (1978). The Implicate Order. Process Studies 8 (2):73-102.
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  27. David Bohm (1986). Time, the Implicate Order and Pre-Space. In David Ray Griffin (ed.), Physics and the Ultimate Significance of Time. State University of New York Press 172--208.
     
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  28.  15
    David Bohm (1996). On the Role of Hidden Variables in the Fundamental Structure of Physics. Foundations of Physics 26 (6):719-786.
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  29.  17
    David Bohm (1982). Response to Schindler's Critique of My Wholeness and the Implicate Order. International Philosophical Quarterly 22 (4):329-339.
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  30. David Bohm (1976). Fragmentation and Wholeness. Van Leer Jerusalem Foundation.
     
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  31. David Bohm (1971). Causality and Chance in Modern Physics. Foreword by Louis de Broglie. University of Pennsylvania Press.
     
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  32.  24
    David Bohm, Sean Kelly & Edgar Morin (1996). Order, Disorder, and the Absolute: An Experiment in Dialogue. World Futures 46 (4):223-237.
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  33. David Bohm (1987). Unfolding Meaning a Weekend Dialogue with David Bohm.
     
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  34.  16
    David Bohm (1984). Tacit Knowledge and the Diplicate Order. Tradition and Discovery 12 (1):25-27.
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  35.  2
    David BÖHM, Charles Biederman, Correspondence Volume One, Luc Borot & James Harrington (1999). ARIEW Roger, John Cottingham and Tom Sorell (Eds): Descartes' Medi. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (2):389-394.
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  36. David Joseph Bohm, Detlef D¨ Urr,1 Sheldon Goldstein,2 and Nino Zangh´I.
    David Bohm, Emeritus Professor of Theoretical Physics at Birkbeck College of the University of London and Fellow of the Royal Society, died of a heart attack on October 29, 1992 at the age of 74. Professor Bohm had been one of the world’s leading authorities on quantum theory and its interpretation for more than four decades. His contributions have been critical to all aspects of the field. He also made seminal contributions to plasma physics. His name appears prominently in the (...)
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  37.  13
    David Bohm & Sean Kelly (1990). Dialogue on Science, Society, and the Generative Order. Zygon 25 (4):449-467.
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  38.  14
    David Bohm (1985). Response to Conference Papers on "David Bohm's Implicate Order: Physics, Philosophy, and Theology". Zygon 20 (2):219-220.
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  39. David Bohm (1973). Human Nature as the Product of Our Mental Models. In Jonathan Benthall (ed.), The Limits of Human Nature. New York,Dutton
     
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  40.  5
    David Bohm (1968). Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 19 (2):253-256.
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  41. Charles Biederman & David Bohm (1999). Bohm-Biederman Correspondence: Creativity in Art and Science. Routledge.
    "It was sheer chance that I encountered David Bohm's writing in 1958 ... I knew nothing about him. What struck me about his work and prompted my initial letter was his underlying effort to seek for some larger sense of reality, which seemed a very humanized search." - Charles Biederman, from the foreword of the book This book marks the beginning of a four thousand page correspondence between Charles Biederman, founder of Constructivism in the 1930s, and David Bohm the prestigious (...)
     
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  42. David Bohm & Jean Bouchart D'orval (1996). Au Cœr de L'Humain.
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  43. David Bohm (2004). Causality and Chance in Modern Physics. Routledge.
    In this classic, David Bohm was the first to offer us his causal interpretation of the quantum theory. _Causality and Chance in Modern Physics_ continues to make possible further insight into the meaning of the quantum theory and to suggest ways of extending the theory into new directions.
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  44. David Bohm (1961). Classical and Non-Classical Concepts in Quantum Theory. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 12:265.
     
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  45. David Bohm (2005). Childhood: Second Edition. Routledge.
    In this book Chris Jenks looks at what the ways in which we construct our image of childhood can tell us about ourselves. After a general discussion of the social construction of childhood, the book is structured around three examples of the way the image of the child is played out in society: the history of childhood from medieval times through the enlightenment 'discovery' of childhood to the present the mythology and reality of child abuse and society's response to it (...)
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  46. David Bohm (2013). Childhood: Second Edition. Routledge.
    In this book Chris Jenks looks at what the ways in which we construct our image of childhood can tell us about ourselves. After a general discussion of the social construction of childhood, the book is structured around three examples of the way the image of the child is played out in society: the history of childhood from medieval times through the enlightenment 'discovery' of childhood to the present the mythology and reality of child abuse and society's response to it (...)
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  47. David Bohm & Science Council of Canada (1984). Fragmentation and Wholeness in Science and Society Transcript of a Seminar Sponsored by the Science Council of Canada, Ottawa 10 May 1983. Science Council of Canada.
     
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  48. David Bohm (2012). On Creativity. Routledge.
    Creativity is fundamental to human experience. In _On Creativity_ David Bohm, the world-renowned scientist, investigates the phenomenon from all sides: not only the creativity of invention and of imagination but also that of perception and of discovery. This is a remarkable and life-affirming book by one of the most far-sighted thinkers of modern times.
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  49. David Bohm (2013). On Dialogue. Routledge.
    David Bohm is considered one of the best physicists of all time. He also had a deep interest in human communication and creativity. Influential in both management and communication theory in what is known 'Bohm Dialogue', On Dialogue is both inspiring and pioneering. Bohm considers the origin and very meaning of dialogue, reflecting on what gets in the way of "true dialogue". He argues that dialogue, as a radical form of exploration that allows different views to be presented, leads us (...)
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  50. David Bohm (2004). On Dialogue. Routledge.
    Never before has there been a greater need for deeper listening and more open communication to cope with the complex problems facing our organizations, businesses and societies. Renowned scientist David Bohm believed there was a better way for humanity to discover meaning and to achieve harmony. He identified creative dialogue, a sharing of assumptions and understanding, as a means by which the individual, and society as a whole, can learn more about themselves and others, and achieve a renewed sense of (...)
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