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David C. Gooding [4]David C. Gooding [1]
  1. David C. Gooding (2010). Visualizing Scientific Inference. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (1):15-35.
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  2. David C. Gooding (2006). Visual Cognition: Where Cognition and Culture Meet. Philosophy of Science 73 (5):688-698.
    Case studies of diverse scientific fields show how scientists use a range of resources to generate new interpretative models and to establish their plausibility as explanations of a domain. They accomplish this by manipulating imagistic representations in particular ways. I show that scientists in different domains use the same basic transformations. Common features of these transformations indicate that general cognitive strategies of interpretation, simplification, elaboration, and argumentation are at work. Social and historical studies of science emphasize the diversity of local (...)
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  3. David C. Gooding (2005). Seeing the Forest for the Trees: Visualization, Cognition, and Scientific Inference. In M. Gorman, R. Tweney, D. Gooding & A. Kincannon (eds.), Scientific and Technological Thinking. Erlbaum. 2005--173.
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  4. Michael E. Gorman, Ryan D. Tweney, David C. Gooding & Alexandra P. Kincannon (2005). The Future of Cognitive Studies of Science and Technology. In M. Gorman, R. Tweney, D. Gooding & A. Kincannon (eds.), Scientific and Technological Thinking. Erlbaum.
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  5. David C. Gooding (1992). What is Experimental about Thought Experiments? PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:280 - 290.
    I argue that thought experiments are a form of experimental reasoning similar to real experiments. They require the same ability to participate by following a narrative as real experiments do. Participation depends in turn on using what we already know to visualize, manipulate and understand what is unfamiliar or problematic. I defend the claim that visualization requires embodiment by an example which shows how tacit understanding of the properties of represented objects and relations enables us to work out how such (...)
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