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  1. David C. Thomasma (2004). Choices, Autonomy, and Moral Capacity. In David C. Thomasma & David N. Weisstub (eds.), The Variables of Moral Capacity. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 9--22.
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  2. David C. Thomasma & David N. Weisstub (eds.) (2004). The Variables of Moral Capacity. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Moral capacity is an important feature of what it means to be human. In this volume, the contributors have taken on the daunting task of trying to distinguish between legal and moral capacity. This distinction is difficult at times for clinicians, philosophers and legal scholars alike. Part of the challenge of defining moral capacity lies in the difficulty of adequately categorizing it. For this reason, the editors have chosen to divide the book into three parts. The first looks at the (...)
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  3. David N. Weisstub & David C. Thomasma (2004). Moral Capacity. In David C. Thomasma & David N. Weisstub (eds.), The Variables of Moral Capacity. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 139--149.
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  4. David C. Thomasma (2002). Early Bioethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (04):335-343.
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  5. David C. Thomasma (2002). Reflections. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (04):326-326.
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  6. David C. Thomasma (2001). Proposing a New Agenda: Bioethics and International Human Rights. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (3):299-310.
    Our global knowledge of different cultures and the diversity of values increases almost daily. New challenges arise for ethics. This is especially true in the field of bioethics because the technological progress of medicine throughout the world is causing dramatic interactions with traditionally held values. Science and technology are rapidly advancing beyond discussions and corresponding political struggles over human rights, leaving those debates behind. This rapid development of science is at odds with the principle of sustained development that calls for (...)
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  7. David C. Thomasma (2001). Bioethics with a Difference: A Comment on McElhinney and Pellegrino. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (4):287-290.
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  8. David C. Thomasma (2001). Ethics Consultation Rules: A Comment on George J Agich. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):46-47.
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  9. David C. Thomasma (2001). Personhood and Health Care. Kluwer Academic Pub..
    This book offers a rich variety of thoughtful explorations on the nature of the human person especially as related to health care, medicine, and mental health. Rarely are so many different viewpoints collected in one place about the intriguing puzzle that is the concept of person, human dignity, and the special place human beings hold in the goals of healing and the social structures of medical delivery. Ramifications of the theory of personhood are presented for bioethics, genetics, individuality, uniqueness, international (...)
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  10. David C. Thomasma (2001). Selling Human Egg Donation. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):1.
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  11. Edmund D. Pellegrino & David C. Thomasma (2000). Dubious Premises—Evil Conclusions: Moral Reasoning at the Nuremberg Trials. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (02):261-274.
    Fifty years ago, 23 Nazi physicians were defendants before a military tribunal in Nuremberg, charged with crimes against humanity. During that trial, the world learned of their personal roles in human experimentation with political and military prisoners, mass eugenic sterilizations, state-ordered euthanasia of the and the program of genocide we now know as the Holocaust. These physicians, and their colleagues who did not stand trial, were universally condemned in the free world as ethical pariahs. The term became the paradigm for (...)
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  12. David C. Thomasma (2000). A Model of Community Substituted Consent for Research on the Vulnerable. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (1):47-57.
    Persons of diminished capacity, especially those who are still legally competent but are de facto incompetent should still be able to participate in moderately risky research projects that benefit the class of persons with similar diseases. It is argued that this view can be supported with a modified communitarianism, a philosophy ofmedicine that holds that health care is a joint responsibility that meets foundational human needs. The mechanism for obtaining a substituted consent I call ``community consent,'' and distinguish this from (...)
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  13. David C. Thomasma (2000). Moral and Metaphysical Reflections on Multiple Personality Disorder. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (3):235-260.
  14. David C. Thomasma (2000). Medical Ethics. Philosophical Inquiry 22 (4):7-23.
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  15. David C. Thomasma, Thomasine Kimbrough-Kushner, Gerrit R. Kimsma, Chris Ciesielski-Carlucci & Helga Kuhse (2000). Book Reviews-Asking to Die: Inside the Dutch Debate About Euthanasia. Bioethics-Oxford 14 (1):85-88.
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  16. David C. Thomasma & David N. Weisstub (2000). Forgiving and Forgetting: A Post-Holocaust Dialogue on the Possibility of Healing. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (4):542-561.
    At the end of this century there are so many occasions, so many residues of the most violent of times, that challenge the very idea of forgivenessNorthern Ireland, Bosnia, the Tutsis and Hutus, the Shiite and Suni Moslems, the settlers and African immigrants in South Africa, indigenous populations against the dominant culture. The open violence and rapaciousness of human enmity can be viewed now in the displacement of masses of people in Kosovo. Said the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, Sadako (...)
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  17. Renu Jain, David C. Thomasma & Rasa Ragas (1999). Ethical Challenges in the Treatment of Infants of Drug-Abusing Mothers. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (02):179-188.
    Nationwide, almost 11% of women abuse drugs during their pregnancy. In some communities, these numbers are as high as 25–30%. Drug abuse is not limited to the poor or to African Americans, but is seen among affluent and white Americans as well. It is widespread, irrespective of race or social class. Annually, nearly 375,000 infants are exposed to drugs in America. Because of the terrible suffering caused by these births, and the conflicts caregivers experience in the treatment of these infants, (...)
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  18. Jonathan Muraskas, Patricia A. Marshall, Paul Tomich, Thomas F. Myers, John G. Gianopoulos & David C. Thomasma (1999). Neonatal Viability in the 1990s: Held Hostage by Technology. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (02):160-170.
    The emergence of new obstetrical and neonatal technologies, as well as more aggressive clinical management, has significantly improved the survival of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants. This development has heightened concerns about the limits of viability. ELBW infants, weighing less than 1,000 grams and no larger than the palm of one's hand, are often described as of late twentieth century technology. Improved survivability of ELBW infants has provided opportunities for long-term follow-up. Information on their physical and emotional development contributes (...)
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  19. David C. Thomasma (1999). Stewardship of the Aged: Meeting the Ethical Challenge of Ageism. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (02):148-159.
    Medical ethics is a footnote to the larger problem of directing our technology to good human ends. Written large, then, medical ethics must ask five basic questions.
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  20. David C. Thomasma, Kenneth C. Micetich, John Brems & David van Thiel (1999). The Ethics of Competition in Liver Transplantation. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (03):321-329.
    The behavior of people in the presence of scarce resources has long been a source of ethical concern and debate. Many of the responses, ranging from outright brutality and cheating on the one hand to altruism, nobility, and sacrifice on the other, were most recently demonstrated in the movie Titanic. It should come as no surprise, then, that rational efforts to allocate the very scarce life-saving resource of organs are sometimes circumvented by these natural human impulses and sheer human creativity. (...)
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  21. Renu Jain, David C. Thomasma & Rasa Ragas (1998). Response to “Ethics and Drug Infants” by Michelle Oberman (CQ Vol. 6, No. 2). Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (1):94-96.
    We appreciated the important commentary provided by Michelle Oberman on our paper, (CQ Vol. 6, No. 1). For the most part we agree with Oberman's analysis of the issues, but there are seven points of variance, either of conception, emphasis, or accuracy. We wish to clarify these and welcome the chance her commentary provided to offer aspects of the social situation surrounding the case we presented.
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  22. Renu Jain, David C. Thomasma & Rasa Ragas (1998). Response to “Ethics and Drug Infants” by Michelle Oberman (CQ Vol. 6, No. 2) Points of Variance. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (1):94-96.
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  23. David C. Thomasma (1998). Assessing the Arguments for and Against Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: Part Two. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (4):388-401.
    In Márquez's OfLoveandOtherDemons Abrenuncio the physician and the Marquis discuss the outbreak of rabies that is the centerpiece of the book, since the Marquis' daughter has been bitten by a rabid dog. Abrenuncio notes that the poor.
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  24. Renu Jain & David C. Thomasma (1997). Discontinuing Life Support in an Infant of a Drug-Addicted Mother: Whose Decision is It? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (1):48-54.
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  25. David C. Thomasma (1997). CQ Interview: Edmund D. Pellegrino on the Future of Bioethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (4):373-.
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  26. David C. Thomasma (1997). Antifoundationalism and the Possibility of a Moral Philosophy of Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 18 (1-2).
    The problem of developing a moral philosophy of medicine is explored in this essay. Among the challenges posed to this development are the general mistrust of moral philosophy and philosophy in general created by post-modernist philosophical and even anti-philosophical thinking. This reaction to philosophical systematization is usually called antifoundationalism. I distinguish different forms of antifoundationalism, showing that not all forms of their opposites, foundationalism, are alike, especially with regards to claims made about the certitude of moral thought. I conclude that (...)
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  27. David C. Thomasma (1997). Bioethics and International Human Rights. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (4):295-306.
  28. David C. Thomasma (1997). Ensuring a Good Death. Bioethics Forum 13 (4):7-17.
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  29. David C. Thomasma (1997). Edmund D. Pellegrino Festschrift. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 18 (1-2).
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  30. David C. Thomasma & Erich H. Loewy (1997). A Dialogue on Species-Specific Rights: Humans and Animals in Bioethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (04):435-.
  31. Patricia A. Marshall, David C. Thomasma & Abdallah S. Daar (1996). Marketing Human Organs: The Autonomy Paradox. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (1).
    The severe shortage of organs for transplantation and the continual reluctance of the public to voluntarily donate has prompted consideration of alternative strategies for organ procurement. This paper explores the development of market approaches for procuring human organs for transplantation and considers the social and moral implications of organ donation as both a gift of life and a commodity exchange. The problematic and paradoxical articulation of individual autonomy in relation to property rights and marketing human body parts is addressed. We (...)
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  32. Edmund D. Pellegrino, David C. Thomasma & Maurizio Mori (1996). The Virtue in Medical Ethics. Bioethics-Oxford 10 (2):176-179.
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  33. David C. Thomasma (1996). An Analysis of Arguments for and Against Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: Part One. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (01):62-.
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  34. David C. Thomasma (1996). When Physicians Choose to Participate in the Death of Their Patients: Ethics and Physician-Assisted Suicide. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (3):183-197.
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  35. David C. Thomasma & Thomasine Kimbrough Kushner (eds.) (1996). Birth to Death: Science and Bioethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Biology has been advancing with explosive pace over the last few years and in so doing has raised a host of ethical issues. This book, aimed at the general reader, reviews the major advances of recent years in biology and medicine and explores their ethical implications. From birth to death the reader is taken on a tour of human biology - covering genetics, reproduction, development, transplantation, aging, dying and also the use of animals in research and the impact of human (...)
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  36. David C. Thomasma & Erich H. Loewy (1996). Exploring the Role of Religion in Medical Ethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (02):257-.
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  37. David C. Thomasma, Jonathan Muraskas, Patricia A. Marshall, Thomas Myers, Paul Tomich & James A. O'Neill (1996). The Ethics of Caring for Conjoined Twins The Lakeberg Twins. Hastings Center Report 26 (4):4-12.
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  38. Donald S. Rubenstein, David C. Thomasma, Eric A. Schon & Michael J. Zinaman (1995). Germ-Line Therapy to Cure Mitochondrial Disease: Protocol and Ethics of In Vitro Ovum Nuclear Transplantation. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (03):316-.
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  39. David C. Thomasma (1995). Beyond Autonomy to the Person Coping With Illness. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (01):12-.
  40. David C. Thomasma (1995). Ethics Consultation: A Practical Guide. John La Puma and David Schiedermayer. Boston/London: Jones and Bartlett, 1994. 234 Pages. $29.95. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (03):401-.
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  41. David C. Thomasma (1995). Principles of Health Care Ethics. Gillon R, Ed, Lloyd A, Assist. Ed. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1994. 1118 Pp. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (02):251-.
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  42. David C. Thomasma (1995). The Ethical Challenge of Providing Healthcare for the Elderly. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (02):148-.
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  43. David C. Thomasma (1995). Editorial. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 16 (3).
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  44. David C. Thomasma (1995). From the Editor in Chief. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 16 (1).
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  45. David C. Thomasma & Thomasine Kushner (1995). A Dialogue on Compassion and Supererogation in Medicine. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (04):415-.
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  46. Patricia Marshall, David C. Thomasma & Jurrit Bergsma (1994). Intercultural Reasoning: The Challenge for International Bioethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (03):321-.
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  47. John F. Monagle & David C. Thomasma (eds.) (1994). Health Care Ethics: Critical Issues. Aspen Publishers.
     
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  48. David C. Thomasma (1994). Telling the Truth to Patients: A Clinical Ethics Exploration. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (03):375-.
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  49. David C. Thomasma (1994). Clinical Ethics as Medical Hermeneutics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (2).
    There are several branches of ethics. Clinical ethics, the one closest to medical decisionmaking, can be seen as a branch of medicine itself. In this view, clinical ethics is a unitary hermeneutics. Its rule is a guideline for unifying other theories of ethics in conjunction with the clinical context. Put another way, clinical ethics interprets the clinical situation in light of a balance of other values that, while guiding the decisionmaking process, also contributes to the very weighting of those values. (...)
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  50. David C. Thomasma (1994). Editor's Note. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (1).
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