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  1. David Carr (1974). Husserl's Crisis and the Problem of History. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 5 (3):127-148.
  2. David M. Carr (forthcoming). Book Review: The Divine Symphony: The Bible's Many Voices. [REVIEW] Interpretation 58 (3):304-307.
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  3.  6
    Paul Ricoeur, David Carr, Edward G. Ballard & Lester E. Embree (2007). Husserl: An Analysis of His Phenomenology. Northwestern University Press.
    Paul Ricoeur was one of the foremost interpreters and translators of Edmund Husserl's philosophy. These nine essays present Ricoeur's interpretation of the most important of Husserl's writings, with emphasis on his philosophy of consciousness rather than his work in logic. In Ricoeur's philosophy, phenomenology and existentialism came of age and these essays provide an introduction to the Husserlian elements which most heavily influenced his own philosophical position.
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  4.  87
    David M. Carr (forthcoming). Book Review: Reading Law: The Rhetorical Shaping of the Pentateuch. [REVIEW] Interpretation 54 (3):318-318.
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  5.  26
    David Carr (2013). Varieties of Gratitude. Journal of Value Inquiry 47 (1-2):17-28.
  6. David Carr (2003). Making Sense of Education: An Introduction to the Philosophy and Theory of Education and Teaching. Routledgefalmer.
    Making Sense of Education provides a contemporary introduction to the key issues in educational philosophy and theory. Exploring recent developments as well as important ideas from the twentieth century, this book aims to make philosophy of education relevant to everyday practice for teachers and student teachers, as well as those studying education as an academic subject.
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  7. David Carr (1979). The Logic of Knowing How and Ability. Mind 88 (351):394-409.
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  8.  57
    David Carr (1999). Professionalism and Ethics in Teaching. Routledge.
    Professionalism and Ethics in Teaching examines the ethical issues of teaching. After discussing the moral implications of professionalism, David Carr explores the relationship of education theory to teaching practice and the impact of this relationship on professional expertise. He then identifies and examines some central ethical and moral issues in education and teaching. Finally he gives a detailed analysis of a range of issues concerning the role of the teacher and the management of educational issues. Professionalism and Ethics in Teaching (...)
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  9. David Carr & J. W. Steutel (eds.) (1999). Virtue Ethics and Moral Education. Routledge.
    This book takes a major step in the philosophy of education by moving back past the Enlightenment and reinstating Aristotelian Virtue at the heart of moral education.
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  10.  32
    David Carr (2015). Is Gratitude a Moral Virtue? Philosophical Studies 172 (6):1475-1484.
    One matter upon which the already voluminous philosophical and psychological literature on the topic seems to be agreed is that gratitude is a psychologically and socially beneficial human quality of some moral significance. Further to this, gratitude seems to be widely regarded by positive psychologists and virtue ethicists as a moral virtue. This paper, however, sets out to show that such claims and assumptions about the moral character of gratitude are questionable and that its status as a moral virtue is (...)
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  11.  6
    David Carr (1991). Time, Narrative, and History. Indiana University Press.
    "For description and defense of the narrative configurations of everyday life, and of the practical and social character of those narratives, there is no better treatment than Time, Narrative, and History.... a clear, judicious, and truthful account, provocative from beginning to end." —Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology "... a superior work of philosophy that tells a unique and insightful story about narrative." —Quarterly Journal of Speech.
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  12. David Carr (2009). Virtue, Mixed Emotions and Moral Ambivalence. Philosophy 84 (1):31-46.
    Aristotelian virtue ethics invests emotions and feelings with much moral significance. However, the moral and other conflicts that inevitably beset human life often give rise to states of emotional division and ambivalence with problematic implications for any understanding of virtue as complete psychic unity of character and conduct. For one thing, any admission that the virtuous are prey to conflicting passions and desires may seem to threaten the crucial virtue ethical distinction between the virtuous and the continent. One recent attempt (...)
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  13.  31
    James Arthur, Kristján Kristjánsson, Sandra Cooke, Emma Brown & David Carr, The Good Teacher: Understanding Virtues in Practice: Research Report.
    This report describes research focusing on virtues and character in teaching, by which we mean the kind of personal qualities professional teachers need to facilitate learning and overall flourishing in young people that goes beyond preparing them for a life of tests. The ‘good’ teacher is someone who, alongside excellent subject knowledge and technical expertise, cares about students, upholds principles of honesty and integrity both towards knowledge and student–teacher relationships, and who does good work . In the Framework for Character (...)
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  14. David Carr (1999). The Paradox of Subjectivity: The Self in the Transcendental Tradition. Oxford University Press.
    Challenging prevailing interpretations of the development of modern philosophy, this book proposes a reinterpretation of the transcendental tradition, as represented primarily by Kant and Husserl, and counters Heidegger's influential reading of these philosophers. Author David Carr defends their subtle and complex transcendental investigations of the self and the life of subjectivity, and seeks to revive an understanding of what Husserl calls "the paradox of subjectivity"--an appreciation for the rich and sometimes contradictory character of experience.
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  15.  7
    David Carr (2015). The Paradox of Gratitude. British Journal of Educational Studies 63 (4):429-446.
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  16.  24
    David Carr (2005). On the Contribution of Literature and the Arts to the Educational Cultivation of Moral Virtue, Feeling and Emotion. Journal of Moral Education 34 (2):137-151.
    This paper sets out to explore connections between a number of plausible claims concerning education in general and moral education in particular: (i) that education is a matter of broad cultural initiation rather than narrow academic or vocational training; (ii) that any education so conceived would have a key concern with the moral dimensions of personal formation; (iii) that emotional growth is an important part of such moral formation; and (iv) that literature and other arts have an important part to (...)
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  17.  61
    David Carr (2003). Character and Moral Choice in the Cultivation of Virtue. Philosophy 78 (2):219-232.
    It is central to virtue ethics both that morally sound action follows from virtuous character, and that virtuous character is itself the product of habitual right judgement and choice: that, in short, we choose our moral characters. However, any such view may appear to encounter difficulty in those cases of moral conflict where an agent cannot simultaneously act (say) both honestly and sympathetically, and in which the choices of agents seem to favour the construction of different moral characters. This paper (...)
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  18. David Carr (2008). 1. Narrative Explanation and its Malcontents. History and Theory 47 (1):19–30.
    In this paper I look at narrative as a mode of explanation and at various ways in which the explanatory value of narrative has been criticized. I begin with the roots of narrative explanation in everyday action, experience, and discourse, illustrating it with the help of a simple example. I try to show how narrative explanation is transformed and complicated by circumstances that take us beyond the everyday into such realms as jurisprudence, journalism, and history. I give an account of (...)
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  19.  16
    David Carr (2014). Four Perspectives on the Value of Literature for Moral and Character Education. Journal of Aesthetic Education 48 (4):1-16.
    We all know that something is eternal. And it ain’t houses and it ain’t names, and it ain’t earth, and it ain’t even the stars . . . everybody knows in their bones that something is eternal, and that something has to do with human beings. All the greatest people ever lived have been telling us that for five thousand years and yet you’d be surprised how people are always losing hold of it. There’s something way down deep that’s eternal (...)
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  20.  7
    David Carr (2014). The Human and Educational Significance of Honesty as an Epistemic and Moral Virtue. Educational Theory 64 (1):1-14.
    While honesty is clearly a virtue of some educational as well as moral significance, its virtue-ethical status is far from clear. In this essay, following some discussion of latter-day virtue ethics and virtue epistemology, David Carr argues that honesty exhibits key features of both moral and epistemic virtue, and, more precisely, that honesty as a virtue might best be understood as the epistemic component of Aristotelian practical wisdom. In the wake of arguments to be found in Plato's Laws, as well (...)
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  21. David Carr (2004). Moral Values and the Arts in Environmental Education: Towards an Ethics of Aesthetic Appreciation. Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (2):221–239.
  22.  30
    David Carr (1986). Narrative and the Real World: An Argument for Continuity. History and Theory 25 (2):117-131.
    Narrative and the real world are not mutually exclusive. Life is not a structureless sequence of events; it consists of complex structures of temporal configurations that interlock and receive their meaning from within action itself. It is also not true that life lacks a point of view which transforms events into a story by telling them. Our focus of attention is not the past but the future, because we grasp configurations extending into the future. Action involves the adoption of an (...)
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  23.  1
    Blaire Morgan, Liz Gulliford & David Carr (2015). Educating Gratitude: Some Conceptual and Moral Misgivings. Journal of Moral Education 44 (1):97-111.
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  24.  15
    David Carr (1996). After Kohlberg: Some Implications of an Ethics of Virtue for the Theory of Moral Education and Development. Studies in Philosophy and Education 15 (4):353-370.
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  25.  51
    David Carr (2014). Sebastian Luft: Subjectivity and Lifeworld in Transcendental Phenomenology. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 30 (2):163-169.
    As the title suggests, Sebastian Luft’s book concerns Husserl’s mature thought, from the “transcendental turn” of Ideas I to the latest works of the 1930s. Even though its various chapters have been published separately before, it makes up a coherent whole and works well as a book. Transitional passages have been added to tie the chapters together. The book is clearly the work of a thorough and consummate Husserl scholar who has a grasp of all the works, published, posthumously published, (...)
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  26.  53
    David Carr (1980). Propositions Negatable in Three Ways. Analysis 40 (4):214 - 219.
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  27.  2
    Robin Attfield & David Carr (1992). Educating the Virtues: An Essay on the Philosophical Psychology of Moral Development and Education. Philosophical Quarterly 42 (168):379.
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  28.  49
    David Carr (2002). Feelings in Moral Conflict and the Hazards of Emotional Intelligence. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (1):3-21.
    From some perspectives, it seems obvious that emotions and feelings must be both reasonable and morally significant: from others, it may seem as obvious that they cannot be. This paper seeks to advance discussion of ethical implications of the currently contested issue of the relationship of reason to feeling and emotion via reflection upon various examples of affectively charged moral dilemma. This discussion also proceeds by way of critical consideration of recent empirical enquiry into these issues in the literature of (...)
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  29.  31
    David Carr (2003). Rival Conceptions of Practice in Education and Teaching. Journal of Philosophy of Education 37 (2):253–266.
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  30.  6
    David Carr (2016). From Gratitude to Lamentation: On the Moral and Psychological Economy of Gift, Gain and Loss. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (1):41-59.
    The passing of Nelson Mandela and other figures of contemporary importance may prompt the interesting question of how we might or should understand the psychological, social and moral function of lamentation in human life. This paper aims to show that such responses are not just of emotional and interpersonal significance, but also of serious moral import. To this end, the paper proceeds via exploration of conceptually and morally suggestive correspondences or resonances between the logical grammar of lamentation—which, to be sure, (...)
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  31.  48
    David Carr & Don Skinner (2009). The Cultural Roots of Professional Wisdom: Towards a Broader View of Teacher Expertise. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (2):141-154.
    Perhaps the most pressing issue concerning teacher education and training since the end of the Second World War has been that of the role of theory—or principled reflection—in professional expertise. Here, although the main post-war architects of a new educational professionalism clearly envisaged a key role for theory—considering such disciplines as psychology, sociology and philosophy as indispensable for reflective practice—there are nevertheless well-rehearsed difficulties about crediting such disciplines with quite the (applied) role in educational practice of (say) physiology or anatomy (...)
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  32.  57
    David Carr (1999). Professional Education and Professional Ethics Right to Die or Duty to Live? Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (1):33–46.
  33.  19
    David Carr (2006). Moral Education at the Movies: On the Cinematic Treatment of Morally Significant Story and Narrative. Journal of Moral Education 35 (3):319-333.
    Much contemporary social theory has emphasised the key role that cultural and other narrative plays in any human understanding of moral self and agency. However, in those modern social contexts in which literacy has been widespread, such access to narrative has also been largely via the written word: those significantly educated in cultural heritage have been the primarily well?read. Still, in an age in which communication is most commonly prosecuted through the electronic media of radio, cinema, television and computer, it (...)
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  34.  12
    David Carr (1999). Where's the Merit If the Best Man Wins? Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 26 (1):1-9.
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  35.  33
    David Carr (1974). Phenomenology and the Problem of History: A Study of Husserl's Transcendental Philosophy. Northwestern University Press.
    In Phenomenology and the Problem of History. David Carr examines the paradox involving Husserl's transcendental philosophy and his later historicist theory.
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  36. Bonnie Kent, Jan Steutel, David Carr, John Haldane, Paul Crittenden, Eamonn Callan, Joel J. Kupperman, Ben Spiecker & Kenneth A. Strike (1999). PART 4 107 Weakness and Integrity 8 Moral Growth and the Unity of the Virtues 109. In David Carr & J. W. Steutel (eds.), Virtue Ethics and Moral Education. Routledge
     
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  37.  64
    David Carr (2010). Dangerous Knowledge: On the Epistemic and Moral Significance of Arts in Education. Journal of Aesthetic Education 44 (3):1-15.
    Plato is usually credited as the source of the "ancient quarrel" between reason and rhetoric—and, for him, the arts fall mostly on the less favorable side of rhetoric.1 To be sure, Plato's harsh verdict on the arts rests on an idealist metaphysics and epistemology (or realism about universals)—enshrining a general pessimism about the epistemic prospects of sense experience—which few, nowadays, would consider persuasive. For Plato, since what is presented to us by the senses is no more than an inaccurate copy (...)
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  38.  6
    David Carr (2010). Education, Contestation and Confusions of Sense and Concept. British Journal of Educational Studies 58 (1):89 - 104.
    In the contemporary literature of educational philosophy and theory, it is almost routinely assumed or claimed that 'education' is a 'contested' concept: that is, it is held that education is invested – as it were, 'all the way down' - with socially constructed interests and values that are liable to diverge in different contexts to the point of mutual opposition. It is also often alleged that post-war analytical philosophers of education such as R. S. Peters failed to appreciate such contestability (...)
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  39.  34
    David Carr (1981). Knowledge in Practice. American Philosophical Quarterly 18 (1):53 - 61.
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  40.  64
    David Carr (2010). On the Moral Value of Physical Activity: Body and Soul in Plato's Account of Virtue. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (1):3 – 15.
    It is arguable that some of the most profound and perennial issues and problems of philosophy concerning the nature of human agency, the role of reason and knowledge in such agency and the moral status and place of responsibility in human action and conduct receive their sharpest definition in Plato's specific discussion in the Republic of the human value of physical activities. From this viewpoint alone, Plato's exploration of this issue might be considered a locus classicus in the philosophy of (...)
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  41.  99
    David Carr (1998). Phenomenology and Fiction in Dennett. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 6 (3):331-344.
    In Consciousness Explained and other works, Daniel Dennett uses the concept of phenomenology (along with his variant, called heterophenomenology) in almost complete disregard of the work of Husserl and his successors in German and French philosophy. Yet it can be argued that many of the most important ideas of Husserl, Merleau-Ponty and others (and not just the idea of intentionality) reappear in Dennett's work in only slightly altered form. In this article I try to show this in two ways, first (...)
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  42.  3
    David Carr (2016). Husserl and Foucault on the Historical Apriori: Teleological and Anti-Teleological Views of History. Continental Philosophy Review 49 (1):127-137.
    It is well known that Husserl and Foucault use the striking phrase “the historical apriori” at certain key points in their work. Yet most commentators agree that the two thinkers mean very different things by this expression, and the question is why these two authors would employ the same terms for such different purposes. Instead of pursuing this question directly I want to look from a broader perspective at the views of history that are reflected in the different uses of (...)
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  43.  78
    David Carr (1987). Thought and Action in the Art of Dance. British Journal of Aesthetics 27 (4):345-357.
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  44.  22
    David Carr (1993). Moral Values and the Teacher: Beyond the Paternal and the Permissive. Journal of Philosophy of Education 27 (2):193–207.
  45.  21
    David Carr (1992). Education, Learning and Understanding: The Process and the Product. Journal of Philosophy of Education 26 (2):215–225.
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  46.  80
    David Carr (1977). Kant, Husserl, and the Nonempirical Ego. Journal of Philosophy 74 (11):682-690.
  47.  21
    David Carr & Robert Davis (2007). The Lure of Evil: Exploring Moral Formation on the Dark Side of Literature and the Arts. Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (1):95–112.
  48.  67
    David Carr (2004). Music, Meaning, and Emotion. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (3):225–234.
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  49.  14
    David Carr (2007). Religious Education, Religious Literacy and Common Schooling: A Philosophy and History of Skewed Reflection. Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (4):659–673.
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  50.  77
    David Carr (1991). What Relevance has Plato for Education Today? Journal of Philosophy of Education 25 (1):121–128.
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