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Profile: David Chai (Chinese University of Hong Kong)
  1. David Chai (2014). Daoism and Wu. Philosophy Compass 9 (10):663-671.
    This paper introduces the concept of nothingness as used in classical Daoist philosophy, building upon contemporary scholarship by offering a uniquely phenomenological reading of the term. It will be argued that the Chinese word wu bears upon two planes of reality concurrently: as ontological nothingness and as ontic nonbeing. Presenting wu in this dyadic manner is essential if we wish to avoid equating it with Dao itself, as many have been wont to do; rather, wu is the mystery that perpetually (...)
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  2. David Chai (2014). Meontological Generativity: A Daoist Reading of the Thing. Philosophy East and West 64 (2):303-318.
  3. David Chai (2014). Nothingness and the Clearing: Heidegger, Daoism and the Quest for Primal Clarity. Review of Metaphysics 67 (3): 583 - 601.
  4. David Chai (2014). Zhuangzi's Meontological Notion of Time. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (3):361-377.
    This article investigates the concept of time as it is laid forth in the Daoist text, the Zhuangzi 莊子. Arguing that authentic time lies with cosmogony and not reality as envisioned by humanity, the Zhuangzi casts off the ontology of the present-now in favor of the existentially creative negativity of Dao 道. As the pivot of Dao, nothingness not only allows us to side-step the issue of temporal directionality, it reflects the meontological nature of Daoist cosmology in general. Framing time (...)
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  5. David Chai (2013). Wang, Weiwei 王威威, A Study of Hanfeizi's Thought: Taking Huanglao as the Root 韩非思想研究: 以黄老为本. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (1):137-139.
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  6. David Chai (2012). Philosophy and Religion in Early Medieval China. Edited by Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet-Keung Lo . (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2010. V, 375 Pp. Hardback, ISBN 978-1-4384-3187-1. Paperback, ISBN 978-1-4384-3188-8.) Interpretation and Literature in Early Medieval China. Edited by Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet-Keung Lo . (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2010. Vi, 288 Pp. Hardback, ISBN 978-1-4384-3217-5. Paperback, ISBN 978-1-4384-3218-2.). [REVIEW] Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (2):314-316.
  7. David Chai (2010). Meontology in Early Xuanxue Thought. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (1):90-101.
  8. David Chai (2009). Musical Naturalism in the Thought of Ji Kang. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (2):151-171.
    Wei-Jin period is characterized by neo-Daoism ( xuanxue 玄學), and J I Kang lived in the midst of this philosophical exploration. Adopting the naturalism of the Zhuangzi , J i Kang expressed his socio-political concerns through the medium of music, which was previously regarded as having moral bearing and rectitude. Denying such rectitude became central for J i Kang, who claimed that music was incapable of possessing human emotion, releasing it from the chains of Confucian ritualism. His investigation into the (...)
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