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  1. David Cunning (ed.) (2014). The Cambridge Companion to Descartes’ Meditations. Cambridge University Press.
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  2. David Cunning (2013). Descartes on God and the Products of His Will. In. In Jeanine Diller & Asa Kasher (eds.), Models of God and Alternative Ultimate Realities. Springer. 175--193.
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  3. David Cunning (2011). Matter Matters: Metaphysics and Methodology in the Early Modern Period. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (5):997-1001.
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 19, Issue 5, Page 997-1001, September 2011.
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  4. David Cunning, Margaret Lucas Cavendish. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  5. David Cunning (2009). Argument and Persuasion in Descartes' Meditations. Oxford University Press.
    This important volume will be of great interest to scholars of early modern philosophy.
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  6. David Cunning, Descartes' Modal Metaphysics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  7. David Cunning (2008). Fifth Meditation Tins Revisited: A Reply to Criticisms of the Epistemic Interpretation. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (1):215 – 227.
    (2008). Fifth meditation TINs revisited: A reply to criticisms of the epistemic interpretation. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 16, No. 1, pp. 215-227.
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  8. David Cunning (2008). Malebranche and Occasional Causes. Philosophy Compass 3 (3):471–490.
    In VI.ii.3 of The Search After Truth Malebranche offers an argument for the view that only God is a cause. Here I defend an interpretation of the argument according to which Malebranche is supposing (quite rightly) that if there is a necessary connection between a cause and its effect, then if creatures were real causes, God's volitions would not be sufficient to bring about their intended effects. I then consider the argument from constant creation that Malebranche offers in Dialogues on (...)
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  9. David Cunning (2008). Semel in Vita. Faith and Philosophy 24 (2):165-184.
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  10. David Cunning & Seth Jones (2008). Fallen Nature, Fallen Selves: Early Modern French Thought II (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):644-645.
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  11. David Cunning (2007). Descartes on the Dubitability of the Existence of Self. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (1):111 - 131.
    In a number a passages Descartes appears to insist that "I am, I exist" and its variants are wholly indubitable. These passages present an intractable problem of interpretation in the face of passages in which Descartes allows that any result is dubitable, "I am, I exist" included. Here I pull together a number of elements of Descartes' system to show how all of these passages hang together. If my analysis is correct, it tells us something about the perspective that Descartes (...)
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  12. David Cunning (2007). Semel in Vita: Descartes' Stoic View on the Place of Philosophy in Human Life. Faith and Philosophy 24 (2):165-184.
    In his June 1643 letter to Princess Elizabeth, Descartes makes a claim that is a bit surprising given the hyper-intellectualism of the Meditations and other texts. He says that philosophy is something that we should do only rarely. Here I show how Descartes’ recommendation falls out of other components of his system—in particular his stoicism and his views on embodiment. A consequence of my reading is that to an important degree the reasoning of the Fourth Meditation is the imprecise reasoning (...)
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  13. David Cunning (2006). Cavendish on the Intelligibility of the Prospect of Thinking Matter. History of Philosophy Quarterly 23 (2):117 - 136.
  14. David Cunning (2005). Review of David Skrbina, Panpsychism in the West. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (11).
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  15. David Cunning (2003). Descartes on the Immutability of the Divine Will. Religious Studies 39 (1):79-92.
    Descartes holds that God's will is immutable. It cannot be changed by God and, because He is supremely independent, it cannot be changed by anything else. Descartes' God acts by a single immutable will for all eternity, and there is no sense in which it is possible for Him to will or to have willed anything other than what He in fact wills. Passages in which Descartes might appear to be suggesting a different view are simply manifestations of his analytic (...)
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  16. David Cunning (2003). Systematic Divergences in Malebranche and Cudworth. Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (3):343-363.
    : For Cudworth, God would be a drudge if He did each and every thing, and so the universe contains plastic natures. Malebranche argues that finite power is unintelligible and thus that God does do each and every thing. The supremacy of God is reflected in the range of His activity and also in the manner of His activity: He acts by general non-composite volitions. Malebranche (like Cudworth) is careful to adjust other aspects of his system to square with his (...)
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  17. David Cunning (2003). True and Immutable Natures and Epistemic Progress in Descartes's Meditations. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):235 – 248.
    In the _Fifth Meditation, Descartes introduces a being for which his system appears to leave no room. He clearly and distinctly perceives geometrical properties and concludes that, even though they may not actually exist, their _true and immutable natures exist nonetheless. Here I argue that the wedge that Descartes drives between an object and its true and immutable nature is only temporary and that, in the final analysis, a true and immutable nature of any X is just X itself. Given (...)
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  18. David Cunning (1999). Agency and Consciousness. Synthese 120 (2):271-294.
    In Intentionality and other works, John Searle establishes himself as a leading defender of the view that consciousness of what one is doing is always a component of one'€™s action. In this paper I focus on problems with Searle'€™s view to establish that there are actions in which the agent is not at all aware of what she is doing. I argue that any theory that misses this sort of action keeps us from important insights into autonomy, self-knowledge and responsibility.
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  19. Alan Nelson & David Cunning (1999). Cognition and Modality in Descartes. Acta Philosophica Fennica 64:137-154.
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  20. Alan Nelson & David Cunning (1999). Modality and Cognition in Descartes. Acta Philosophica Fennica 64:137.
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