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  1. David Deutsch, It From Qubit.
    Of John Wheeler’s ‘Really Big Questions’, the one on which the most progress has been made is It From Bit? – does information play a significant role at the foundations of physics? It is perhaps less ambitious than some of the other Questions, such as How Come Existence?, because it does not necessarily require a metaphysical answer. And unlike, say, Why The Quantum?, it does not require the discovery of new laws of nature: there was room for hope that it (...)
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  2. David Deutsch, The Discrete and the Continuous.
    A journey of a thousand miles begins, obviously, with a single step. But isn’t it equally obvious that a step of a single metre must begin with a single millimetre? And before you can begin the last micron of that millimetre, don’t you have to get through 999 other microns first? And so ad infinitum? That “ad infinitum” bit is what worried the philosopher Zeno of Elea. Can our every action really consist of sub actions each consisting of sub sub (...)
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  3. David Deutsch, Taking Science Seriously.
    Science in the modern sense began with Galileo's conception of a law of nature: a universal statement about reality, expressed in unambiguous symbols and tested by what he aptly called 'ordeals' (we would call them crucial experiments). Ever since then, a recurrent theme in the history of science has been the tension between two great purposes that are implicit in Galileo's conception: science as a means of making predictions and giving us control of the world; and science as a means (...)
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  4. David Deutsch (2013). Constructor Theory. Synthese 190 (18):4331-4359.
    Constructor theory seeks to express all fundamental scientific theories in terms of a dichotomy between possible and impossible physical transformations–those that can be caused to happen and those that cannot. This is a departure from the prevailing conception of fundamental physics which is to predict what will happen from initial conditions and laws of motion. Several converging motivations for expecting constructor theory to be a fundamental branch of physics are discussed. Some principles of the theory are suggested and its potential (...)
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  5. David Deutsch (2011). The Beginning of Infinity: Explanations That Transform the World. Viking Adult.
    The reach of explanations -- Closer to reality -- The spark -- Creation -- The reality of abstractions -- The jump to universality -- Artificial creativity -- A window on infinity -- Optimism -- A dream of Socrates -- The multiverse -- A physicist's history of bad philosophy -- Choices -- Why are flowers beautiful? -- The evolution of culture -- The evolution of creativity -- Unsustainable -- The beginning.
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  6. David Deutsch (2010). Apart From Universes. In Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent & David Wallace (eds.), Many Worlds? Everett, Quantum Theory, and Reality. Oxford University Press. 542--552.
  7. Twelve Monkeys, Slaughterhouse Five, Ray Bradbury, Theodore Sider, David Lewis, David Deutsch & Michael Lockwood (2009). Space and Time. In Susan Schneider (ed.), Science Fiction and Philosophy: From Time Travel to Superintelligence. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  8. David Deutsch, Artur Ekert & Rossella Lupacchini (2000). Cannot Be Certain, nor Can It Be Justified a Priori. Instead, It Must Be Conjec-Tured, and Then Tested by Experiment, and This Requires It to Be Expressed in a Language Appropriate for Making Precise, Empirically Testable Predictions. That Language is Mathematics. This in Turn Constitutes a Statement About What the Physical World Must. [REVIEW] Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 6 (3).
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  9. David Deutsch, Artur Ekert & Rossella Lupacchini (2000). Machines, Logic and Quantum Physics. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 6 (3):265-283.
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  10. David Deutsch (1999). Quantum Theory of Probability and Decisions. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London:3129--37.
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  11. David Deutsch (1997). The Fabric of Reality. Allan Lane.
    An extraordinary and challenging synthesis of ideas uniting Quantum Theory, and the theories of Computation, Knowledge and Evolution, Deutsch's extraordinary book explores the deep connections between these strands which reveal the fabric ...
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  12. David Deutsch (1996). Comment on Lockwood. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (2):222-228.
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  13. David Deutsch (1986). On Wheeler's Notion of “Law Without Law” in Physics. Foundations of Physics 16 (6):565-572.
    Wheeler's idea that physical “laws” would not appear in a truly fundamental description of nature is critically examined.
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  14. David Deutsch (1986). Three Connections Between Everett's Interpretation and Experiment. In Roger Penrose & C. J. Isham (eds.), Quantum Concepts in Space and Time. New York ;Oxford University Press. 215--225.
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  15. David Deutsch, Comment on 'Many Minds' Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics by Michael Lockwood”.
    At the philosophical foundations of our best and deepest theory of the structure of reality, namely quantum mechanics, there is an intellectual scandal that reflects badly on most of this century’s leading physicists and philosophers of physics. One way of making the nature of the scandal plain is simply to observe that this paper [1] by Lockwood is untainted by it. Lockwood gives us an up to date investigation of metaphysics, and discusses the implications of quantum theory for some of (...)
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  16. David Deutsch, Physics, Philosophy and Quantum Technology.
    Quantum theory and the classical theory of computation were perfected in the 1930s, and fifty years later they were unified to form the quantum theory of computation. Here I want to tell you about a speculation — I can’t call it more than a “speculation” even though I know it’s true — about the kind of theory that might, in another fifty years’ time, supersede or transcend the quantum theory of computation. There are branches of science — in fact most (...)
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