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David Donaldson [4]David I. Donaldson [2]
  1. Chuck Blackorby, Walter Bossert & David Donaldson (2009). Population Ethics. In Paul Anand, Prasanta Pattanaik & Clemens Puppe (eds.), The Handbook of Rational and Social Choice. Oup Oxford.
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  2. Martin Corley, Lucy J. MacGregor & David I. Donaldson (2007). It's the Way That You, Er, Say It: Hesitations in Speech Affect Language Comprehension. Cognition 105 (3):658-668.
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  3. Charles Blackorby, Walter Bossert & David Donaldson (2003). The Axiomatic Approach to Population Ethics. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 2 (3):342-381.
    This article examines several families of population principles in the light of a set of axioms. In addition to the critical-level utilitarian, number-sensitive critical-level utilitarian, and number-dampened utilitarian families and their generalized counterparts, we consider the restricted number-dampened family and introduce two new ones: the restricted critical-level and restricted number-dependent critical-level families. Subsets of the restricted families have non-negative critical levels, avoid the `repugnant conclusion' and satisfy the axiom priority for lives worth living, but violate an important independence condition.
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  4. David I. Donaldson (2001). Vivid Remembering. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):4.
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  5. Charles Blackorby, Walter Bossert & David Donaldson (1997). Critical-Level Utilitarianism and the Population-Ethics Dilemma. Economics and Philosophy 13 (2):197-.
    Advances in technology have made it possible for us to take actions that affect the numbers and identities of humans and other animals that will live in the future. Effective and inexpensive birth control, child allowances, genetic screening, safe abortion, in vitro fertilization, the education of young women, sterilization programs, environmental degradation and war all have these effects. Although it is true that a good deal of effort has been devoted to the practical side of population policy, moral theory has (...)
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  6. Charles Blackorby & David Donaldson (1991). Adult-Equivalence Scales, Interpersonal Comparisons of Well-Being, and Applied Welfare Economics. In Jon Elster & John E. Roemer (eds.), Interpersonal Comparisons of Well-Being. Cambridge University Press. 164.
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