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David Dowty [10]David R. Dowty [5]
  1. Chris Barker & David Dowty, Nominal Thematic Proto-Roles.
    Let us suppose that thematic roles, or something very much like them, are needed to describe lexical and semantic patterns in the behavior of verbal predicates. But what about nouns? Is there evidence independent of verbal constructions motivating a system of nominal thematic relations? We suggest that the general problem of argument selection does in fact motivate a set of quintessentially nominal thematic proto-roles which we call Proto- Part and Proto-Whole. These nominal proto-roles are parallel to but distinct from the (...)
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  2. David Dowty, Anaphora and Type Logical Grammar.
    (2) Type Logical Grammar (Moortgat & Oehrle 1994, Morrill 1994. Moortgat 1996): i. Grammar as a deductive system; variant of linear logic; two deductive rules for each type constructor (=; n; ): elimination ( modus ponens) and introduction ( rule of conditional proof).
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  3. David Dowty, Bound Anaphora and Type Logical Grammar.
    (Though it is now known that many pronouns once lumped under ”bound variables” are in fact referential indefinites or other phenomena better accounted for in a DRT-like view of referents, there remain many true instances of sentenceinternally bound anaphora: this talk concerns only the latter.) Almost all versions of categorial grammar (CG) are differentiated from other syntactic theories in treating a multi-argument verb as an Ò-place predicate phrase (PrdP) that combines with a NP or other argument to yield a (Ò-1)-place (...)
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  4. David Dowty, The Semantic Assymmetry of 'Argument Alternations' (and Why It Matters).
    Fish abound in the pond Garlic reeked on his breath The pond abounds with fish His breath reeked with garlic Such sentences were first noted in Jespersen (1933), then were introduced in Generative Grammar by Fillmore (1968) and Anderson (1971). The most extensive treatment, from which some of the data below is taken, is Salkoff’s (1983) ”Bees are Swarming in the Garden”, Language 59.2, 288-346; cf. also Boons & Leclere (1976) (for discussion of the closely-parallel French data), and see (...) (1993) for further references. For convenience in referring to the two kinds of sentences, I will adopt this terminology: Agent-Subject (A-Subject) Form: “Bees are swarming in the garden” Location-Subject (L-Subject) Form: “The garden is swarming with bees” The swarm-alternation (in which only intransitive verbs are found) should be distinguished carefully from the spray-load -alternation (which allows only transitive verbs). (shrink)
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  5. David Dowty, The Dual Analysis of Adjuncts/Complements in Categorial Grammar.
    The distinction between COMPLEMENTS and ADJUNCTS has a long tradition in grammatical theory, and it is also included in some way or other in most current formal linguistic theories. But it is a highly vexed distinction for several reasons, one of which is that no diagnostic criteria have emerged that will reliably distinguish adjuncts from complements in all cases — too many examples seem to fall into the crack between the two categories, no matter how theorists wrestle with them.
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  6. David Dowty (2007). Compositionality as an Empirical Problem. In Chris Barker & Pauline I. Jacobson (eds.), Direct Compositionality. Oxford University Press. 14--23.
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  7. David Dowty (2007). 2.1 Why Be Interested in Compositionality? In Chris Barker & Pauline I. Jacobson (eds.), Direct Compositionality. Oxford University Press. 14--23.
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  8. David Dowty (2000). The Garden Swarms with Bees' and the Fallacy of 'Argument Alternation'. In Yael Ravin & Claudia Leacock (eds.), Polysemy: Theoretical and Computational Approaches. Oxford University Press. 111--28.
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  9. Chris Barker & David Dowty (eds.) (1992). Proceedings of Sinn Und Bedeutung 2, Ohio State University.
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  10. David Dowty (1986). Preface. Linguistics and Philosophy 9 (1):1-3.
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  11. David R. Dowty (1986). The Effects of Aspectual Class on the Temporal Structure of Discourse: Semantics or Pragmatics? [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 9 (1):37 - 61.
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  12. David R. Dowty (1985). On Recent Analyses of the Semantics of Control. Linguistics and Philosophy 8 (3):291 - 331.
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  13. David R. Dowty (1982). Tenses, Time Adverbs, and Compositional Semantic Theory. Linguistics and Philosophy 5 (1):23 - 55.
    I might summarize this section by saying that the English tenses, according to this analysis, form quite a motley group. PAST, PRES and FUT serve to relate reference time to speech time, while WOULD and USED-TO behave like Priorian operators, shifting the point of evaluation away from the reference time. HAVE also shifts the point of evaluation away from the reference time, but in a more complicated way. And FUT, in contrast to PRES and PAST, is a substitution operator, putting (...)
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  14. David R. Dowty, Robert Eugene Wall & Stanley Peters (1981). Introduction to Montague Semantics. Springer.
    INTRODUCTION Linguists who work within the tradition of transformational generative grammar tend to regard semantics as an intractable, perhaps ultimately ...
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  15. David R. Dowty (1977). Toward a Semantic Analysis of Verb Aspect and the English 'Imperfective' Progressive. Linguistics and Philosophy 1 (1):45 - 77.