Search results for 'David E. Bogen' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. David E. Bogen (1989). A Reappraisal of Habermas's Theory of Communicative Action in Light of Detailed Investigations of Social Praxis. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 19 (1):47–77.score: 870.0
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  2. James Bogen & J. E. McGuire (1986). Aristotle's Great Clock. Philosophy Research Archives 12:387-448.score: 300.0
    This paper offers a detailed account of arguments in De Caelo I by which Aristotle tried to demonstrate the necessity of the perpetual existence and the perpetual rotation of the cosmos. On our interpretation, Aristotle’s arguments are naturalistic. Instead of being based (as many have thought) on rules of logic and language, they depend, we argue, on natural science theories about abilities (δυνάμεις), e.g., to move and to change, which things have by nature and about the conditions under which these (...)
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  3. J. E. Bogen & G. M. Bogen (1983). Hemispheric Specialization and Cerebral Duality. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):517.score: 280.0
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  4. Joseph E. Bogen (1968). The Other Side of the Brain: An Appositional Mind. Bulletin of the Los Angeles Neurological Society 34:135-62.score: 240.0
  5. Joseph E. Bogen (1997). Some Neurophysiologic Aspects of Consciousness. Seminars in Neurology 17:95-103.score: 240.0
  6. Joseph E. Bogen (1995). On the Neurophysiology of Consciousness, Part II: Constraining the Semantic Problem. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (2):137-58.score: 240.0
  7. Joseph E. Bogen (1997). An Example of Access-Consciousness Without Phenomenal Consciousness? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):144-144.score: 240.0
    Both Block and the commentators who accepted his P versus A distinction readily recognize examples of P without A but not vice versa. As an example of A without P, Block hypothesized a computationally like a human but without subjectivity. This would appear to describe the disconnected right hemisphere of the split-brain subject, unless one alternatively opts for two parallel mechanisms for P?
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  8. Joseph E. Bogen (1977). Further Discussion of Split Brains and Hemispheric Capabilities. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 28 (September):281-6.score: 240.0
  9. Joseph E. Bogen (2001). An Experimental Disconnection Approach to a Function of Consciousness. International Journal of Neuroscience 111 (3):135-136.score: 240.0
  10. David Bogen (1991). Linguistic Forms and Social Obligations: A Critique of the Doctrine of Literal Expression in Searle. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 21 (1):31–62.score: 240.0
  11. James Bogen & J. M. E. Moravcsik (1982). Aristotle's Forbidden Sweets. Journal of the History of Philosophy 20 (2):111-127.score: 240.0
  12. Michael Lynch & David Bogen (1991). In Defense of Dada-Driven Analysis. Sociological Theory 9 (2):269-276.score: 240.0
    For a writing to be a writing it must continue to "act" and to be readable even when what is called the author of the writing no longer answers for what he has written, for what he seems to have signed, be it because of a temporary absence, because he is dead or, more generally, because he has not employed his absolutely actual and present intention or attention, the plenitude of his desire to say what he means, in order to (...)
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  13. David Bogen (1993). Order Without Rules: Wittgenstein and the "Communicative Ethics Controversy". Sociological Theory 11 (1):55-71.score: 240.0
    A central supposition of the "communicative ethics controversy" in modern social theory has been either that there exist universal standards against which we can judge the validity of speech and moral argumentation or, conversely, that there are no determinate standards to which moral claims can be held answerable, and hence no methods by which disputes over contested claims can rationally be resolved. In this paper it is argued that the basic terms of this debate are miscast. The "order without rules" (...)
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  14. David Bogen (1996). The Allure of a "Truly General Theory of Knowledge and Science": A Comment on Pels. Sociological Theory 14 (2):187-194.score: 240.0
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  15. David Bogen (1990). Beyond the “Limits” of Mundane Reason. [REVIEW] Human Studies 13 (4):405 - 416.score: 240.0
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  16. Joseph E. Bogen (1995). On the Neurophysiology of Consciousness: 1. An Overview. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):52-62.score: 240.0
  17. Joseph E. Bogen (2004). The Experience of Will: Affective or Cognitive? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):660-661.score: 240.0
    Wegner vacillates between considering the experience of will as a directly-sensed feeling and as a cognitive construct. Most of his book is devoted to examples of erroneous cognition. The brain basis of will as an immediately-sensed emotion receives minimal attention.
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  18. David Bogen (1999). Order Without Rules: Critical Theory and the Logic of Conversation. State University of New York Press.score: 240.0
    Questions whether the logic of language underlying Habermas's theory of communicative action is in fact the defining feature of conversational practice.
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  19. Joseph E. Bogen (1994). Descartes' Fundamental Mistake: Introspective Singularity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):175.score: 240.0
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  20. Joseph E. Bogen (1998). Locating the Subjectivity Pump: The Thalamic Intralaminar Nuclei. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A.C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press.score: 240.0
  21. Joseph E. Bogen (1981). Mental Numerosity: Is One Head Better Than Two? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (1):100.score: 240.0
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  22. Joseph E. Bogen (1995). On the Neurophysiology of Consciousness, Part I: An Overview. Consciousness and Cognition 4:52-62.score: 240.0
  23. Joseph E. Bogen (2007). The Thalamic Intralaminar Nuclei and the Property of Consciousness. In Philip David Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge.score: 240.0
  24. Roger W. Sperry, Michael S. Gazzaniga & Joseph E. Bogen (1969). Interhemispheric Relationships: The Neocortical Commissures; Syndromes of Hemisphere Disconnection. In P. Vinken & G. Bruyn (eds.), Handbook of Clinical Neurology. North Holland. 4--273.score: 240.0
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  25. Jim Bogen (2008). Causally Productive Activities. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (1):112-123.score: 120.0
    This paper suggests and discusses an answer to the question what distinguishes causal from non-causal or coincidental co-occurrences based on Elizabeth Anscombe’s idea that causality is a highly abstract concept whose meaning derives from our understanding of specific causally productive activities (e.g., pulling, scraping, burning), and her rejection of the assumption that causality can be informatively understood in terms of general regularities of some sort.
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  26. Jim Bogen (2008). The Hodgkin‐Huxley Equations and the Concrete Model: Comments on Craver, Schaffner, and Weber. Philosophy of Science 75 (5):1034-1046.score: 120.0
    I claim that the Hodgkin‐Huxley (HH) current equations owe a great deal of their importance to their role in bringing results from experiments on squid giant action preparations to bear on the study of the action potential in other neurons in other in vitro and in vivo environments. I consider ideas from Weber and Craver about the role of Coulomb’s and other fundamental equations in explaining the action potential and in HH’s development of their equations. Also, I offer an embellishment (...)
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  27. J. J. Chriss (2002). David Bogen, Order Without Rules: Critical Theory and the Logic of Conversation. Human Studies 25 (2):241-249.score: 120.0
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  28. Brigitte Falkenburg (2011). What Are the Phenomena of Physics? Synthese 182 (1):149-163.score: 24.0
    Depending on different positions in the debate on scientific realism, there are various accounts of the phenomena of physics. For scientific realists like Bogen and Woodward, phenomena are matters of fact in nature, i.e., the effects explained and predicted by physical theories. For empiricists like van Fraassen, the phenomena of physics are the appearances observed or perceived by sensory experience. Constructivists, however, regard the phenomena of physics as artificial structures generated by experimental and mathematical methods. My paper investigates the (...)
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  29. James F. Woodward (2011). Data and Phenomena: A Restatement and Defense. Synthese 182 (1):165-179.score: 24.0
    This paper provides a restatement and defense of the data/ phenomena distinction introduced by Jim Bogen and me several decades ago (e.g., Bogen and Woodward, The Philosophical Review, 303–352, 1988). Additional motivation for the distinction is introduced, ideas surrounding the distinction are clarified, and an attempt is made to respond to several criticisms.
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  30. Sabina Leonelli (2009). On the Locality of Data and Claims About Phenomena. Philosophy of Science 76 (5):737-749.score: 24.0
    Bogen and Woodward characterized data as embedded in the context in which they are produced (‘local’) and claims about phenomena as retaining their significance beyond that context (‘nonlocal’). This view does not fit sciences such as biology, which successfully disseminate data via packaging processes that include appropriate labels, vehicles, and human interventions. These processes enhance the evidential scope of data and ensure that claims about phenomena are understood in the same way across research communities. I conclude that the degree (...)
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