Search results for 'David E. Cooper' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    David E. Cooper (1997). Wittgenstein, Heidegger and Humility: David E. Cooper. Philosophy 72 (279):105-123.
    In 1929, doubtless to the discomfort of his logical positivist host Moritz Schlick, Wittgenstein remarked, ‘To be sure, I can understand what Heidegger means by Being and Angst ’ . I return to what Heidegger meant and Wittgenstein could understand later. I begin with that remark because it has had an instructive career. When the passage which it prefaced was first published in 1965, the editors left it out—presumably to protect a hero of ‘analytic’ philosophy from being compromised by an (...)
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  2.  5
    David E. Cooper (1984). Metaphors We Live By: David E. Cooper. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 18:43-58.
    Aside from aperçus of Kant, Nietzsche, and of course, Aristotle, metaphor has not, until recently, received its due. The dominant view has been Hobbes': metaphors are an ‘abuse’ of language, less dangerous than ordinary equivocation only because they ‘profess their inconstancy’.
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  3. David E. Cooper (1983). The Free Man: David E. Cooper. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 15:131-145.
    Not long after the historian, Seeley, had defined ‘perfect liberty’ as ‘the absence of all government’, Oscar Wilde wrote that a man can be totally free even in that granite embodiment of governmental constraint, prison. Ten years after Mill's famous defence of civil freedoms, On Liberty , Richard Wagner declaimed: I'll put up with everything—police, soldiers, muzzling of the press, limits on parliament… Freedom of the spiriti is the only thing for men to be proud of and which raises them (...)
     
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  4. David E. Cooper (1995). Technology: Liberation or Enslavement?: David E. Cooper. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 38:7-18.
    The week, twenty-five years ago, of the Apollo spacecraft's return visit to the moon was described by Richard Nixon as the greatest since the Creation. Across the Atlantic, a French Academician judged the same event to matter less than the discovery of a lost etching by Daumier. Attitudes to technological achievement, then, differ. And they always have. Chuang-Tzu, over 2,000 years ago, relates an exchange between a Confucian passer-by and a Taoist gardener watering vegetables with a bucket drawn from a (...)
     
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  5. R. S. Peters & David E. Cooper (eds.) (1986). Education, Values, and Mind: Essays for R.S. Peters. Routledge & K. Paul.
    David E. Cooper Early in, while I was teaching in the United States, I received news of my appointment as a lecturer in the philosophy of education at the ...
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  6. David E. Cooper (1989). Reviews : David Farrell Krell and David Wood (Eds), Exceedingly Nietzsche: Aspects of Contemporary Nietzsche Interpretation, London: Rout- Ledge, 1988, £15.95, Xvi + 179 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 2 (1):111-113.
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  7.  49
    David E. Cooper (2002). The Measure of Things: Humanism, Humility, and Mystery. Oxford University Press.
    David Cooper explores and defends the view that a reality independent of human perspectives is necessarily indescribable, a "mystery." Other views are shown to be hubristic. Humanists, for whom "man is the measure" of reality, exaggerate our capacity to live without the sense of an independent measure. Absolutists, who proclaim our capacity to know an independent reality, exaggerate our cognitive powers. In this highly original book Cooper restores to philosophy a proper appreciation of mystery-that is what provides (...)
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  8.  11
    David Cooper (1983). Authenticity and Learning: Nietzsche's Educational Philosophy. Routledge.
    David E. Cooper elucidates Nietzsche's educational views in detail, in a form that will be of value to educationalists as well as philosophers. In this title, first published in 1983, he shows how these views relate to the rest of Nietzsche's work, and to modern European and Anglo-Saxon philosophical concerns. For Nietzsche, the purpose of true education was to produce creative individuals who take responsibility for their lives, beliefs and values. His ideal was human authenticity. David E. (...)
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  9.  51
    David E. Cooper (2006). A Philosophy of Gardens. Oxford University Press.
    Why do gardens matter so much and mean so much to people? That is the intriguing question to which David Cooper seeks an answer in this book. Given the enthusiasm for gardens in human civilization ancient and modern, Eastern and Western, it is surprising that the question has been so long neglected by modern philosophy. Now at last there is a philosophy of gardens. David Cooper identifies garden appreciation as a special human phenomenon distinct from both (...)
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  10. David E. Cooper (2003). Meaning. Routledge.
    Meaning is one of our most central and most ubiquitous concepts. Anything at all may, in suitable contexts, have meaning ascribed to it. In this wide-ranging book, David Cooper departs from the usual focus on linguistic meaning to discuss how works of art, ceremony, social action, bodily gesture, and the purpose of life can all be meaningful. He argues that the notion of meaning is best approached by considering what we accept as explanations of meaning in everyday practice (...)
     
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  11. David E. Cooper (2003). Meaning. Carleton University Press.
    Meaning is one of our most central and most ubiquitous concepts. Anything at all may, in suitable contexts, have meaning ascribed to it. In this wide-ranging book, David Cooper departs from the usual focus on linguistic meaning to discuss how works of art, ceremony, social action, bodily gesture, and the purpose of life can all be meaningful. He argues that the notion of meaning is best approached by considering what we accept as explanations of meaning in everyday practice (...)
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  12. David E. Cooper (2003). Meaning. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Meaning is one of our most central and most ubiquitous concepts. Anything at all may, in suitable contexts, have meaning ascribed to it. In this wide-ranging book, David Cooper departs from the usual focus on linguistic meaning to discuss how works of art, ceremony, social action, bodily gesture, and the purpose of life can all be meaningful. He argues that the notion of meaning is best approached by considering what we accept as explanations of meaning in everyday practice (...)
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  13. David E. Cooper (2014). Meaning. Routledge.
    Meaning is one of our most central and most ubiquitous concepts. Anything at all may, in suitable contexts, have meaning ascribed to it. In this wide-ranging book, David Cooper departs from the usual focus on linguistic meaning to discuss how works of art, ceremony, social action, bodily gesture, and the purpose of life can all be meaningful. He argues that the notion of meaning is best approached by considering what we accept as explanations of meaning in everyday practice (...)
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  14. David E. Cooper (2002). The Measure of Things: Humanism, Humility, and Mystery. Clarendon Press.
    David Cooper explores and defends the view that a reality independent of human perspectives is necessarily indescribable, a 'mystery'. Other views are shown to be hubristic. Humanists, for whom 'man is the measure' of reality, exaggerate our capacity to live without the sense of an independent measure. Absolutists, who proclaim our capacity to know an independent reality, exaggerate our cognitive powers. In this highly original book Cooper restores to philosophy a proper appreciation of mystery - that is (...)
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  15.  12
    David E. Cooper (1996). Heidegger. Claridge Press.
    With clear philosophical judgement, Cooper guides the reader through the novel concepts of Heideggerian metaphysics, explores the arguments used to introduce ...
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  16.  1
    David E. Cooper (1999). Reactionary Modernism. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 44:291-304.
    ‘Reactionary modernism’ is a term happily coined by the historian and sociologist Jeffrey Herf to refer to a current of German thought during the interwar years. It indicates the attempt to ‘reconcil[e] the antimodernist, romantic and irrationalist ideas present in German nationalism’ with that ‘most obvious manifestation of means–ends rationality … modern technology’. Herf's paradigm examples of this current of thought are two best-selling writers of the period: Oswald Spengler, author of the massive domesday scenario The Decline of the West (...)
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  17. Michael A. Peters, Valerie Allen, Ares D. Axiotis, Michael Bonnett, David E. Cooper, Patrick Fitzsimons, Ilan Gur-Ze'ev, Padraig Hogan, F. Ruth Irwin, Bert Lambeir, Paul Smeyers, Paul Standish & Iain Thomson (2002). Heidegger, Education, and Modernity. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Martin Heidegger is, perhaps, the most controversial philosopher of the twentieth-century. Little has been written on him or about his work and its significance for educational thought. This unique collection by a group of international scholars reexamines Heidegger's work and its legacy for educational thought.
     
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  18.  78
    Elizabeth Fricker & David E. Cooper (1987). The Epistemology of Testimony. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 61 (1):57 - 106.
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  19. Kathleen Marie Higgins Stephen Davies, Robert Stecker Robert Hopkins & E. Cooper David (1996). A Companion to Aesthetics, Second Edition. In Dennis M. Patterson (ed.), A Companion to Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory. Blackwell Publishers
     
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  20.  5
    David E. Cooper, Jurgen Habermas & William Mark Hohengarten (1993). Postmetaphysical Thinking: Philosophical Essays. Philosophical Quarterly 43 (173):572.
    This collection of Habermas's recent essays on philosophical topics continues the analysis begun in The Philosophical Discourse of Modernity. In a short introductory essay, he outlines the sources of twentieth-century philosophizing, its major themes, and the range of current debates. The remainder of the essays can be seen as his contribution to these debates.Habermas's essay on George Herbert Mead is a focal point of the book. In it he sketches a postmetaphysical, intersubjective approach to questions of individuation and subjectivity. In (...)
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  21. David E. Cooper & Simon P. James (2006). Buddhism, Virtue and Environment. Environmental Values 15 (1):138-140.
     
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  22. David E. Cooper (1996). Modern Mythology: The Case of 'Reactionary Modernism'. History of the Human Sciences 9 (2):25-37.
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  23. David E. Cooper (2005). Life and Meaning. Ratio 18 (2):125–137.
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  24.  20
    David E. Cooper (2008). Teaching and Truthfulness. Studies in Philosophy and Education 27 (2-3):79-87.
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  25. David E. Cooper (2006). Truthfulness and 'Inclusion'in Archaeology. In Chris Scarre & Geoffrey Scarre (eds.), The Ethics of Archaeology. Cambridge University Press 131--145.
     
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  26. David E. Cooper (1995). Science, Society and Rationality. History of the Human Sciences 8 (2):109-115.
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  27. David E. Cooper (1999). Existentialism: A Reconstruction. Blackwell Publishers.
    First published in 1990, " Existentialism" is widely regarded as a classic introductory survey of the topic, and has helped to renew interest in existentialist ...
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  28.  38
    David E. Cooper (2009). Filling the Whole. The Philosophers' Magazine 45 (45):83-83.
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  29. David E. Cooper (1980). Illusions of Equality. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  30.  6
    David E. Cooper & Joy A. Palmer (eds.) (1998). Spirit of the Environment: Religion, Value and Environmental Concern. Routledge.
    Spirit of the Environment brings spiritual and religious concerns to environmental issues. Providing a much needed alternative to exploring human beings' relationship to the natural world through the restrictive lenses of 'science', 'ecology', or even 'morality', this book offers a fresh perspective to the field. Spirit of the Enironment addresses: * the environmental attitudes of the major religions; * the relationship between art and nature; * the Gaia hypothesis; * the non-instrumental values which have inspired environmental concern. Contributors range from (...)
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  31.  60
    Gareth B. Matthews New, Andrew R. Bailey, Sarah Buss, Steven M. Cahn, Howard Caygill, David J. Chalmers, John Christman, Michael Clark, David E. Cooper & Simon Critchley (2002). Books for Review and for Listing Here Should Be Addressed to Emily Zakin, Review Editor, Department of Philosophy, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056. Teaching Philosophy 25 (4):403.
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  32.  54
    David E. Cooper (2003). S0ren Kierkegaard. In Robert C. Solomon & David L. Sherman (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to Continental Philosophy. Blackwell Pub. 12--43.
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  33.  12
    David E. Cooper (forthcoming). Music, Nature and Ineffability. Philosophia:1-10.
    In the final chapter of his Ineffability and Religious Experience, Guy Bennett-Hunter proposes that the ineffable may be ‘bodied forth’ through works of art and ritual, and hence engage with our lives. By way of supporting this proposal, this paper discusses some relationships between experiences of music and of natural environments. It is argued that several aspects of musical experience encourage a sense of convergence or intimacy between human practice and nature. Indeed, these aspects suggest a codependence between culture and (...)
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  34. David E. Cooper & Peter S. Fosl (eds.) (2010). Philosophy: The Classic Readings. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Ethics -- Epistemology -- Metaphysics -- Philosophy of religion -- Political philosophy.
     
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  35.  23
    David E. Cooper (2013). Beauty and the Cosmos. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 19:106-117.
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  36.  27
    David E. Cooper (2003). World Philosophies: An Historical Introduction. Blackwell.
    This popular book has now been revised to ensure that it continues to meet the needs of the growing number of people interested in all the main philosophical ...
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  37.  81
    David E. Cooper (1978). Moral Relativism. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 3 (1):97-108.
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  38.  31
    David E. Cooper (2009). Visions of Philosophy. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84 (65):1-.
    Characterizations of philosophy abound. It is ‘the queen of the sciences’, a grand and sweeping metaphysical endeavour; or, less regally, it is a sort of deep anthropology or ‘descriptive metaphysics’, uncovering the general presuppositions or conceptual schemes that lurk beneath our words and thoughts. A different set of images portray philosophy as a type of therapy, or as a spiritual exercise, a way of life to be followed, or even as a special branch of poetry or politics. Then there is (...)
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  39.  36
    David E. Cooper (2008). Beautiful People, Beautiful Things. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (3):247-260.
    This paper sympathetically examines the neglected virtue-centric idea that the primary location of beauty is in bodily expressions of human virtues, so that things like buildings are beautiful only because of an appropriate relationship they have to beautiful people. After a brief history of the idea as articulated by, for example, Kant, it is then distinguished from accounts of beauty with which it might be confused, such as the view that something is beautiful only if it helps to instil virtue. (...)
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  40.  32
    David E. Cooper (1985). Cognitive Development and Teaching Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 4 (4):313 - 329.
    This paper discusses how to use cognitive developmental psychology to create a business ethics course that has philosophical integrity. It begins with the pedagogical problem to be overcome when students are not philosophy majors. To provide a context for the practical recommendations, Kohlberg's cognitive developmental theory is summarized and then the relationship between Kohlberg's theory, normative philosophy, and teaching is analyzed. The conclusion recommends strategies that should help overcome some of the vexing pedagogical problems mentioned in the first section. In (...)
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  41.  34
    David E. Cooper (1983). On Reading Nietzsche on Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 17 (1):119–126.
  42.  30
    David E. Cooper (1994). The Presidential Address: Analytical and Continental Philosophy. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 94:1 - 18.
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  43.  44
    David E. Cooper (2003). In Praise of Gardens. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (2):101-113.
    The paper asks whether gardens may be objects of ‘serious’ (in Ronald Hepburn's sense) and distinctive appreciation. Dismissive attitudes to the possibility of such appreciation, including Hegel's, are rejected, as is the view—Kant's, for example—that garden appreciation is ‘factorizable’ into the modes appropriate for artworks and ‘raw’ nature respectively. That view entails that there is nothing distinctive in garden appreciation. Attention then turns to the idea that it is the representational/symbolic capacities of gardens that render them objects of distinctive appreciation. (...)
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  44.  57
    David E. Cooper (1972). Searle on Intentions and Reference. Analysis 32 (5):159 - 163.
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  45.  16
    David E. Cooper (1972). Innateness: Old and New. Philosophical Review 81 (4):465-483.
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  46. David E. Cooper (2009). Mystery, World and Religion. In John Cornwell & Michael McGhee (eds.), Philosophers and God: At the Frontiers of Faith and Reason. Continuum
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  47.  46
    David E. Cooper (2010). The Cultural Landscape. The Philosophers' Magazine 50 (50):32-33.
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  48.  45
    David E. Cooper (2009). Art, Nature, Significance. The Philosophers' Magazine 44 (44):27-35.
    It is by now something of a cliché of Green discourse that environmental degradation and devastation is grounded in a sharp opposition – the legacy, it is often charged, of Christian metaphysics – between the human and the non-human, between the realms of culture and nature. If one is to understand, let alone endorse, the very general environmentalist ambition to dissolve the dualism of the human and the non-human, it is by questioning rather more tractable and particular dichotomies, like that (...)
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  49.  41
    David E. Cooper (2007). Finding the Music Again. The Philosophers' Magazine 38 (38):45-46.
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  50.  21
    David E. Cooper (2014). Daoism, Nature and Humanity. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 74:95-108.
    This paper sympathetically explores Daoism's relevance to environmental philosophy and to the aspiration of people to live in a manner convergent with nature. After discussing the Daoist understanding of nature and the dao (Way), the focus turns to the implications of these notions for our relationship to nature. The popular idea that Daoism encourages a return to a way of life is rejected. Instead, it is shown that the Daoist proposal is one of living more than people generally do in (...)
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