125 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
David E. Cooper [125]David Edward Cooper [7]
  1. David E. Cooper (2014). Birds, Beasts and the Dao. The Philosophers' Magazine 65:84-90.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. David E. Cooper (2014). Daoism, Nature and Humanity. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 74:95-108.
    This paper sympathetically explores Daoism's relevance to environmental philosophy and to the aspiration of people to live in a manner convergent with nature. After discussing the Daoist understanding of nature and the dao (Way), the focus turns to the implications of these notions for our relationship to nature. The popular idea that Daoism encourages a return to a way of life is rejected. Instead, it is shown that the Daoist proposal is one of living more than people generally do in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. David E. Cooper (2011). Gardening - Philosophy for Everyone: Cultivating Wisdom. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. David E. Cooper (2010). Locations of Buddhism: Colonialism and Modernity in Sri Lanka. Contemporary Buddhism 11 (2):287-290.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. David E. Cooper (2010). The Cultural Landscape. The Philosophers' Magazine 50 (50):32-33.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. David E. Cooper & Peter S. Fosl (eds.) (2010). Philosophy: The Classic Readings. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Ethics -- Epistemology -- Metaphysics -- Philosophy of religion -- Political philosophy.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. David E. Cooper (2009). Art, Nature, Significance. The Philosophers' Magazine 44 (44):27-35.
    It is by now something of a cliché of Green discourse that environmental degradation and devastation is grounded in a sharp opposition – the legacy, it is often charged, of Christian metaphysics – between the human and the non-human, between the realms of culture and nature. If one is to understand, let alone endorse, the very general environmentalist ambition to dissolve the dualism of the human and the non-human, it is by questioning rather more tractable and particular dichotomies, like that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. David E. Cooper (2009). Filling the Whole. The Philosophers' Magazine 45 (45):83-83.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. David E. Cooper (2009). Music, Education, and the Emotions. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (4):642-652.
  10. David E. Cooper (2009). Mystery, World and Religion. In John Cornwell & Michael McGhee (eds.), Philosophers and God: At the Frontiers of Faith and Reason. Continuum
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. David E. Cooper (2009). Visions of Philosophy. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84 (65):1-.
    Characterizations of philosophy abound. It is ‘the queen of the sciences’, a grand and sweeping metaphysical endeavour; or, less regally, it is a sort of deep anthropology or ‘descriptive metaphysics’, uncovering the general presuppositions or conceptual schemes that lurk beneath our words and thoughts. A different set of images portray philosophy as a type of therapy, or as a spiritual exercise, a way of life to be followed, or even as a special branch of poetry or politics. Then there is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Stephen Davies, Kathleen Marie Higgins, Robert Hopkins, Robert Stecker & David E. Cooper (eds.) (2009). A Companion to Aesthetics. John Wiley & Sons.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Stuart Sim, Kathleen Marie Higgins, Robert Hopkins, Robert Stecker & David E. Cooper, Deconstruction.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. David E. Cooper (2008). Beautiful People, Beautiful Things. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (3):247-260.
    This paper sympathetically examines the neglected virtue-centric idea that the primary location of beauty is in bodily expressions of human virtues, so that things like buildings are beautiful only because of an appropriate relationship they have to beautiful people. After a brief history of the idea as articulated by, for example, Kant, it is then distinguished from accounts of beauty with which it might be confused, such as the view that something is beautiful only if it helps to instil virtue. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. David E. Cooper (2008). Metaphor and Derrida's Philosophy of Language. In Robert Eaglestone & Simon Glendinning (eds.), Derrida's Legacies: Literature and Philosophy. Routledge
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. David E. Cooper (2008). Teaching and Truthfulness. Studies in Philosophy and Education 27 (2-3):79-87.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. David E. Cooper (2008). The Taste Culture Reader: Experiencing Food and Drink. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (1):98-99.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. David E. Cooper (2007). Finding the Music Again. The Philosophers' Magazine 38 (38):45-46.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. David E. Cooper (2007). The Measure of Things: Humanism, Humility, and Mystery. Oxford University Press.
    David Cooper explores and defends the view that a reality independent of human perspectives is necessarily indescribable, a "mystery." Other views are shown to be hubristic. Humanists, for whom "man is the measure" of reality, exaggerate our capacity to live without the sense of an independent measure. Absolutists, who proclaim our capacity to know an independent reality, exaggerate our cognitive powers. In this highly original book Cooper restores to philosophy a proper appreciation of mystery-that is what provides a measure of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. David E. Cooper (2006). A Philosophy of Gardens. Oxford University Press.
    Why do gardens matter so much and mean so much to people? That is the intriguing question to which David Cooper seeks an answer in this book. Given the enthusiasm for gardens in human civilization ancient and modern, Eastern and Western, it is surprising that the question has been so long neglected by modern philosophy. Now at last there is a philosophy of gardens. David Cooper identifies garden appreciation as a special human phenomenon distinct from both from the appreciation of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. David E. Cooper (2006). Nature, Aesthetic Engagement, and Reverie. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 18 (33-34).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. David E. Cooper (2006). Truthfulness and 'Inclusion'in Archaeology. In Chris Scarre & Geoffrey Scarre (eds.), The Ethics of Archaeology. Cambridge University Press 131--145.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. David E. Cooper & Simon P. James (2006). Buddhism, Virtue and Environment. Environmental Values 15 (1):138-140.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. David E. Cooper (2005). El mundo islámico. In Manuel Garrido (ed.), El Legado Filosófico y Científico Del Siglo Xx. Cátedra 999--1011.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. David E. Cooper (2005). El Pensamiento Indio Del Siglo XX. In Manuel Garrido (ed.), El Legado Filosófico y Científico Del Siglo Xx. Cátedra 957--972.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. David E. Cooper (2005). Heidegger on Nature. Environmental Values 14 (3):339 - 351.
    The primary purpose of the paper is the broadly exegetical one of explaining and connecting Heidegger's many remarks, made in several different contexts of enquiry, on nature. The three main contexts are those of ontology, scientific methodology, and technology. After showing how Heidegger's central theses in these contexts are related to one another, I argue, in the final section, that his observations on scientific method are pivotal. Unless these are secured, his further claims about ontology and technology lose their essential (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. David E. Cooper (2005). Life and Meaning. Ratio 18 (2):125–137.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. David E. Cooper (2005). True to Life: Why Truth Matters by Michael P. Lynch. Cambridge, MASS.: MIT Press, 2004, Pp. XII + 204. Philosophy 80 (4):601-604.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. David E. Cooper (2003). In Praise of Gardens. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (2):101-113.
    The paper asks whether gardens may be objects of ‘serious’ (in Ronald Hepburn's sense) and distinctive appreciation. Dismissive attitudes to the possibility of such appreciation, including Hegel's, are rejected, as is the view—Kant's, for example—that garden appreciation is ‘factorizable’ into the modes appropriate for artworks and ‘raw’ nature respectively. That view entails that there is nothing distinctive in garden appreciation. Attention then turns to the idea that it is the representational/symbolic capacities of gardens that render them objects of distinctive appreciation. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. David E. Cooper (2003). Meaning. Routledge.
    Meaning is one of our most central and most ubiquitous concepts. Anything at all may, in suitable contexts, have meaning ascribed to it. In this wide-ranging book, David Cooper departs from the usual focus on linguistic meaning to discuss how works of art, ceremony, social action, bodily gesture, and the purpose of life can all be meaningful. He argues that the notion of meaning is best approached by considering what we accept as explanations of meaning in everyday practice and shows (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. David E. Cooper (2003). S0ren Kierkegaard. In Robert C. Solomon & David L. Sherman (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to Continental Philosophy. Blackwell Pub. 12--43.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. David E. Cooper (2003). Truth and Truthfulness: An Essay in Genealogy, by Bernard Williams. Princeton University Press 2002, Pp. XI + 328. Philosophy 78 (3):411-414.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. David E. Cooper (2003). World Philosophies: An Historical Introduction. Blackwell.
    This popular book has now been revised to ensure that it continues to meet the needs of the growing number of people interested in all the main philosophical ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. David Edward Cooper (2003). Nietzsche and the Analytical Ambition. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 26 (1):1-11.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. David E. Cooper (2002). Emptiness: Interpretation and Metaphor. Contemporary Buddhism 3 (1):7-20.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Gareth B. Matthews New, Andrew Bailey, Sarah Buss, Steven M. Cahn, Howard Caygill, David J. Chalmers, John Christman, Michael Clark, David E. Cooper & Simon Critchley (2002). Books for Review and for Listing Here Should Be Addressed to Emily Zakin, Review Editor, Department of Philosophy, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056. Teaching Philosophy 25 (4):403.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Michael A. Peters, Valerie Allen, Ares D. Axiotis, Michael Bonnett, David E. Cooper, Patrick Fitzsimons, Ilan Gur-Ze'ev, Padraig Hogan, F. Ruth Irwin, Bert Lambeir, Paul Smeyers, Paul Standish & Iain Thomson (2002). Heidegger, Education, and Modernity. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Martin Heidegger is, perhaps, the most controversial philosopher of the twentieth-century. Little has been written on him or about his work and its significance for educational thought. This unique collection by a group of international scholars reexamines Heidegger's work and its legacy for educational thought.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. David E. Cooper (2001). Heidegger's Philosophy of Art. Julian Young. Mind 110 (440):1133-1137.
  39. David E. Cooper (2001). Philosophy, Environment and Technology. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 48:141-153.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. David E. Cooper & Timothy L. S. Sprigge (eds.) (2000). Metaphysics: The Classic Readings. Blackwell Publishers.
    This volume is an essential collection of the most influential attempts to depict the fundamental nature of reality or being-from Spinoza’s doctrine of a ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. David E. Cooper (1999). Existentialism: A Reconstruction. Blackwell Publishers.
    First published in 1990, " Existentialism" is widely regarded as a classic introductory survey of the topic, and has helped to renew interest in existentialist ...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. David E. Cooper (1999). Humanism and the Scientific Worldview. Theoria 46 (93):1-17.
  43. David E. Cooper (1999). Reactionary Modernism. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 44:291-304.
    ‘Reactionary modernism’ is a term happily coined by the historian and sociologist Jeffrey Herf to refer to a current of German thought during the interwar years. It indicates the attempt to ‘reconcil[e] the antimodernist, romantic and irrationalist ideas present in German nationalism’ with that ‘most obvious manifestation of means–ends rationality … modern technology’. Herf's paradigm examples of this current of thought are two best-selling writers of the period: Oswald Spengler, author of the massive domesday scenario The Decline of the West (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. David E. Cooper, Jitendranath Mohanty & Ernest Sosa (eds.) (1999). Epistemology: The Classic Readings. Blackwell Publishers.
    From Plato to Quine, this volume provides a concise collection of the essential, classic readings in theory of knowledge.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. David E. Cooper (1998). Authenticity, Life and Liberal Education. In Paul Heywood Hirst & Patricia White (eds.), Philosophy of Education: Major Themes in the Analytic Tradition. Routledge 32--67.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. David E. Cooper (1998). Aesthetic Value. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (2):490-492.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. David E. Cooper (1998). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 38 (4):105-113.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. David E. Cooper (1998). Heidegger, Philosophy, Nazism by Julian Young. Cambridge University Press, 1977, Pp. XV + 232. Philosophy 73 (2):305-324.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. David E. Cooper (1998). Self and Morality in Schopenhauer and Nietzsche. In Christopher Janaway (ed.), Willing and Nothingness: Schopenhauer as Nietzsche's Educator. Clarendon Press 214--215.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 125