Search results for 'David E. Copeland' (try it on Scholar)

10 found
Sort by:
  1. David E. Copeland (2006). Theories of Categorical Reasoning and Extended Syllogisms. Thinking and Reasoning 12 (4):379 – 412.score: 960.0
    The aim of this study was to examine the predictions of three theories of human logical reasoning, (a) mental model theory, (b) formal rules theory (e.g., PSYCOP), and (c) the probability heuristics model, regarding the inferences people make for extended categorical syllogisms. Most research with extended syllogisms has been restricted to the quantifier “All” and to an asymmetrical presentation. This study used three-premise syllogisms with the additional quantifiers that are used for traditional categorical syllogisms as well as additional syllogistic figures. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Ryan A. Brown, David H. Rehkopf, William E. Copeland, E. Jane Costello & Carol M. Worthman (2009). Lifecourse Priorities Among Appalachian Emerging Adults: Revisiting Wallace's Organization of Diversity. Ethos 37 (2):225-242.score: 870.0
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. S. Chopra, B. J. Copeland, E. Corazza, S. Donaho, F. Ferreira, H. Field, D. M. Gabbay, L. Goldstein, J. Heidema & M. J. Hill (2002). Benton, RA, 527 Blackburn, P., 281 Braüner, T., 359 Brink, C., 543. Journal of Philosophical Logic 31 (615).score: 240.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Mark E. Fenn, Richard Haeuber, Gail S. Tonnesen, Jill S. Baron, Susanne Grossman-Clarke, Diane Hope, Daniel A. Jaffe, Scott Copeland, Linda Geiser, Heather M. Rueth & James O. Sickman (2003). Nitrogen Emissions, Deposition, and Monitoring in the Western United States. Bioscience 53 (4):391.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Elizabeth Dreike Almer, Audrey A. Gramling & Steven E. Kaplan (2008). Impact of Post-Restatement Actions Taken by a Firm on Non-Professional Investors' Credibility Perceptions. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (1):61 - 76.score: 30.0
    The frequency of earnings restatements has been increasing over the last decade. Restating previous earnings erodes perceived trustworthiness and competence of management, giving firms strong incentives to take actions to enhance perceived credibility of future financial reports [Farber, D. B.: 2005, The Accounting Review 80(2), 539–561.]. Using an experimental case, we examine the ability of post-restatement actions taken by a firm to positively influence non-professional investors’ perceptions of management’s financial reporting credibility. Our examination considers credibility judgments following two types of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Carol E. Cleland (2002). 'Turing Limit'. Some of Them (Steinhart, Copeland) Represent Extensions of Tur-Ing's Account, Whereas Others Defend Alternatives Notions of Effective Computability (Bringsjord and Zenzen, Wells). Minds and Machines 12:157-158.score: 24.0
  7. K. E. Aubert (1958). Review: A. H. Copeland, Frank Harary, A Characterization of Implicative Boolean Rings. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 23 (1):58-58.score: 24.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. K. E. Aubert (1959). Review: Arthur H. Copeland, Frank Harary, The Extension of an Arbitrary Boolean Algebra to an Implicative Boolean Algebra. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 24 (3):254-254.score: 24.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. E. J. Michaud, M. J. van Vugt, S. J. Bultman, H. O. Sweet M. T. Davisson & R. P. Woychik Devel (1994). 8, 1463,(1994); Perry, WL, NG Copeland and NA Jenkins. Bioessays 16:705.score: 24.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Vincent C. Müller (2011). On the Possibilities of Hypercomputing Supertasks. Minds and Machines 21 (1):83-96.score: 18.0
    This paper investigates the view that digital hypercomputing is a good reason for rejection or re-interpretation of the Church-Turing thesis. After suggestion that such re-interpretation is historically problematic and often involves attack on a straw man (the ‘maximality thesis’), it discusses proposals for digital hypercomputing with Zeno-machines , i.e. computing machines that compute an infinite number of computing steps in finite time, thus performing supertasks. It argues that effective computing with Zeno-machines falls into a dilemma: either they are specified such (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation