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  1. Richard A. Bernardi, Michael R. Melton, Scott D. Roberts & David F. Bean (2008). Fostering Ethics Research: An Analysis of the Accounting, Finance and Marketing Disciplines. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):157 - 170.
    This study compares the level of ethics research published in 25 business-ethics journals and the Top-40 journals for the accounting, finance, and marketing disciplines. This research documents an increasing level of ethics research in the accounting and marketing disciplines starting in 1992. While the level of finance doctorates reported by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) has increased at a higher rate (40.4%) than accounting (18.4%) and marketing (32.2%) since 1995, this increase has not been reflected in (...)
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  2. David F. Bean & Richard A. Bernardi (2007). A Proposed Structure for an Accounting Ethics Course. Journal of Business Ethics Education 4:27-54.
    The article argues for a stand-alone ethics course in accounting and details the shortfalls and questionable approach of “teaching ethics across the curriculum”, especially for those preparing for professional careers in accounting. The need for a prerequisite course in the philosophy of ethics and moral reasoning is also addressed. A proposed semester listing of course topics for an accounting ethics course is presented, with supporting reasoning for their inclusion, and a detailed semester course syllabus is provided for consideration.
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  3. David F. Bean & Richard A. Bernardi (2007). Ethics Education in Our Colleges and Universities: A Positive Role for Accounting Practitioners. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 5 (1):59-75.
    In this research, we review the current level of ethics education prior to college and the emphasis of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) on business ethics education in college using an ‘across the curriculum’ approach. We suggest that business schools and accounting practitioners can forge a more meaningful partnership than what currently exists through the traditional business advisory council prevalent at most schools of business. Ethical conduct is inherent in the practice of public accounting and a (...)
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  4. Jill M. D'Aquila, David F. Bean & Elena G. Procario-Foley (2004). Students' Perception of the Ethical Business Climate: A Comparison with Leaders in the Community. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 51 (2):155-166.
    Although undergraduate students are exposed to ethical issues through class assignments, discussions, and readings, they typically do not have first hand experience with business dilemmas. Student opinions on ethical standards and behavior in American business have received scant attention in the literature. The purpose of the study is to provide additional information to both educators and organizations about the ethical perceptions of students. Furthermore, the study contrasts student responses to business and community leaders' responses obtained in a prior study conducted (...)
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  5. M. D. Jill, David F. Bean & Elena G. Procario-Foley (2004). Students' Perception of the Ethical Business Climate: A Comparison with Leaders in the Community. Journal of Business Ethics 51 (2):155-166.
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  6. David F. Bean & M. D. Jill (2003). Accounting Students as Surrogates for Accounting Professionals When Studying Ethical Dilemmas: A Cautionary Note. Teaching Business Ethics 7 (3):187-204.
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  7. Elena G. Procario-Foley & David F. Bean (2002). Institutions of Higher Education: Cornerstones in Building Ethical Organizations. Teaching Business Ethics 6 (1):101-116.
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  8. David F. Bean (2001). Equivocal Reporting: Ethical Communication Issues. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 29 (1-2):65 - 76.
    Communication is crucial to the fulfillment of organizational members'' responsibilities. Bavelas et al. (1990) describe equivocation as nonstraightforward communication. It appears ambiguous, contradictory, obscure or even evasive. In their view, equivocation is a form of information control for the purpose of maintaining social relationships. It is avoidance; a response chosen when all other communication choices in the situation would lead to negative consequences.A critical role of accountants and other organizational members is the communication of results and activities to management. Professional (...)
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