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  1. David Fergusson (forthcoming). Book Review: Covenant, Community and the Common Good. [REVIEW] Interpretation 59 (1):105-105.
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  2. David Fergusson (2013). Humans Created According to the Imago Dei: An Alternative Proposal. Zygon 48 (2):439-453.
    Classical approaches to the idea of the imago Dei in the theology of creation have tended to postulate a distinctive element of the human being not found in other creatures, with the possible exception of angels. This is often combined with attempts to use the imago concept as an organizing principle within Christian theology. Such approaches are now problematic not merely on account of their exegetical findings, but for methodological reasons. In light of recent exegesis, the imago Dei in Genesis (...)
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  3. David Fergusson (2013). The Absence of God and Its Contextual Significance for Hume. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 11 (1):69-85.
    Hume's thoroughgoing religious scepticism is set within the context of the Scottish Enlightenment. Against some interpreters, it is argued that, although elusive, his ‘attenuated deism’ (Gaskin) is not wholly dismissive of all forms of religious thought and practice. His position is further compared with contemporary expressions of ‘new atheism’. Despite some obvious similarities, Hume's position is judged more nuanced both in terms of content and rhetorical strategy.
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  4. Christopher L. Fisher & David Fergusson (2006). Karl Rahner and the Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence Question. Heythrop Journal 47 (2):275–290.
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  5. Christopher L. Fisher & David Fergusson (2006). Karl Rahner and the Intelligence Question. Heythrop Journal 47:275-290.
    Throughout his writings, Karl Rahner remained open to the prospect that the process of cosmic evolution had yielded sentient life form in other galaxies. He argued against any theological veto on this notion, while also distinguishing the existential significance of such life forms from that of angles. Furthermore, the possibility of multiple incarnations is raised though not affirmed. With its Christological intensity, his theology seems to militate against any repetition of the incarnation. This essay examines some of the arguments for (...)
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  6. David Fergusson (1999). Reclaiming the Doctrine of Sanctification. Interpretation 53 (4):380-390.
    Any contemporary doctrine of sanctification faces certain problems, including the charges of individualism, Pelagianism, and detachment from the concerns of the world. Nevertheless, a strong doctrine of sanctification is the necessary counterpoint to a doctrine of justification. In an increasingly fragmented culture, sanctification needs to be set within an account of the church as a community of moral and spiritual formation.
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  7. David Fergusson (1998). Community, Liberalism, and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    This book explores some current issues on the borderland between moral philosophy and Christian theology. Particular attention is paid to the issues at stake between liberals and communitarians and the dispute between realists, non-realists and quasi-realists. In the course of the discussion the writings of Alasdair MacIntyre, George Lindbeck and Stanley Hauerwas are examined. While sympathetic to many of the typical features of post-liberalism, the argument is critical at selected points in seeking to defend realism and accommodate some aspects of (...)
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