Search results for 'David G. Lockwood' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. David G. Lockwood (2003). “Parallel Architecture” as a Variety of Stratificationalism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):686-687.score: 870.0
    The model of parallel architecture for language presented by Jackendoff is a kind of stratificational model in the spirit of Sydney Lamb. It differs from the more usual stratificationalism most importantly in its clear commitment to nativism, though the variety of nativism is greatly modified from what is more usual among Chomskyans. The revised model presents a potential for fruitful discussion with proponents of stratificationalism, and the potential for enrichment via a relational implementation.
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  2. Gail A. Eisnitz, Moira Ferguson, Elizabeth Hess, Barbara Hodgson, Alan Holland, Andrew Johnson, James M. Jasper, Joanne Elizabeth Lauck, Randall Lockwood & Frank Ascione (1997). Cleveland Amory Ranch of Dreams Middlesex, UK: Viking Penguin, 1997, 288 Pp. Susan G. Davis Spectacular Nature: Corporate Culture and the Sea World Experience. [REVIEW] Ethics and Behavior 7:2.score: 360.0
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  3. Michael Lockwood (1984). Reply to David Gordon's Special Relativity and the Location of Mental Events. Analysis 44 (June):127-128.score: 360.0
     
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  4. Michael Lockwood & G. E. M. Anscombe (1983). Sins of Omission? The Non-Treatment of Controls in Clinical Trials. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 57:207 - 227.score: 240.0
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  5. Linda G. Lockwood (1990). Eugene P. Odum: Ecology and Our Endangered Life-Support Systems. Environmental Ethics 12 (4):375-378.score: 240.0
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  6. G. M. Lockwood (1999). Pregnancy, Autonomy and Paternalism. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (6):537-540.score: 240.0
    Modern medicine is increasingly aware of the significance of patient autonomy in making treatment choices. This would seem to be particularly important where the therapy requested was "voluntary" as in fertility treatment or cosmetic surgery. However, the Hippocratic doctrine "Primum non nocere", seems especially relevant where the treatment sought may have a low chance of a successful outcome or even be life-threatening. Mrs A's case demonstrates the difficulty faced by the physician who wants to maximise her patient's autonomy, but "Above (...)
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  7. Twelve Monkeys, Slaughterhouse Five, Ray Bradbury, Theodore Sider, David Lewis, David Deutsch & Michael Lockwood (2009). Space and Time. In Susan Schneider (ed.), Science Fiction and Philosophy: From Time Travel to Superintelligence. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 240.0
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  8. Jeffrey Bell, Nick Crossley, William O. Stephens, Shannon Sullivan, David Leary, Margaret Watkins, Robert Miner, Thornton Lockwood, Terrance MacMullan, Peter Fosl, Dennis Des Chene, Clare Carlisle & Edward Casey (2013). A History of Habit: From Aristotle to Bourdieu. Lexington Books.score: 240.0
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  9. Deborah P. Britzman, Robert R. Sherman, Malcolm B. Campbell, Jacob L. Susskind, Robert O. Riggs, David B. Bills, Cheryl L. Sattler & John H. Lockwood (1994). Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW] Educational Studies 25 (4):273-282.score: 240.0
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  10. Morton Rieber & David Lockwood (1969). Effects of Correction on Double-Alternation Learning in Children. Journal of Experimental Psychology 79 (1p1):191.score: 240.0
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  11. Jeffrey A. Lockwood (1997). Competing Values and Moral Imperatives: An Overview of Ethical Issues in Biological Control. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 14 (3):205-210.score: 120.0
    This overview and synthesis of the papers presented in this Special Issue suggests that there is a remarkably rich set of ethical issues having direct relevance to the development and practice of biological control for the management of agricultural pests. The perception and resolution of ethical issues appear to emerge from a set of factors that includes one's ethical viewpoint (anthropocentric or biocentric), agricultural system (industrial or sustainable), economic context (rich or poor), and power structure (expert or public). From this (...)
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  12. David Deutsch, Comment on 'Many Minds' Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics by Michael Lockwood”.score: 42.0
    At the philosophical foundations of our best and deepest theory of the structure of reality, namely quantum mechanics, there is an intellectual scandal that reflects badly on most of this century’s leading physicists and philosophers of physics. One way of making the nature of the scandal plain is simply to observe that this paper [1] by Lockwood is untainted by it. Lockwood gives us an up to date investigation of metaphysics, and discusses the implications of quantum theory for (...)
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  13. David Deutsch (1996). Comment on Lockwood. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (2):222-228.score: 36.0
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  14. David Hodgson (2012). Rationality + Consciousness = Free Will. OUP USA.score: 30.0
    In recent years, philosophical discussions of free will have focused largely on whether or not free will is compatible with determinism. In this challenging book, David Hodgson takes a fresh approach to the question of free will, contending that close consideration of human rationality and human consciousness shows that together they give us free will, in a robust and indeterministic sense. In particular, they give us the capacity to respond appositely to feature-rich gestalts of conscious experiences, in ways that (...)
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  15. Meir Hemmo & Itamar Pitowsky (2003). Probability and Nonlocality in Many Minds Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (2):225-243.score: 28.0
    We argue that certain types of many minds (and many worlds) interpretations of quantum mechanics, e.g. Lockwood ([1996a]), Deutsch ([1985]) do not provide a coherent interpretation of the quantum mechanical probabilistic algorithm. By contrast, in Albert and Loewer's ([1988]) version of the many minds interpretation, there is a coherent interpretation of the quantum mechanical probabilities. We consider Albert and Loewer's probability interpretation in the context of Bell-type and GHZ-type states and argue that it implies a certain (weak) form of (...)
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  16. Itamar Pitowsky (2003). Probability and Nonlocality in Many Minds Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (2):225 - 243.score: 28.0
    We argue that certain types of many minds (and many worlds) interpretations of quantum mechanics, e.g. Lockwood ([1996a]), Deutsch ([1985]) do not provide a coherent interpretation of the quantum mechanical probabilistic algorithm. By contrast, in Albert and Loewer's ([1988]) version of the many minds interpretation, there is a coherent interpretation of the quantum mechanical probabilities. We consider Albert and Loewer's probability interpretation in the context of Bell-type and GHZ-type states and argue that it implies a certain (weak) form of (...)
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  17. Theodore Sider (1997). A New Grandfather Paradox? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (1):139-144.score: 24.0
    In an article in Scientific American (March 1994, pp. 68–74) entitled “The Quantum Physics of Time Travel”, Oxford physicist David Deutsch and Oxford philosopher Michael Lockwood give a defense of the physical possibility of time travel based on the “Many Worlds” interpretation of quantum mechanics. This positive view of theirs is not my concern, however—I want to quarrel with their argument that time travel cannot be accommodated in any other way.1 The best way to spell out the traditional (...)
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  18. Torin Alter & Yujin Nagasawa (2012). What is Russellian Monism? Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (9-10):9-10.score: 24.0
    Russellian monism offers a distinctive perspective on the relationship between the physical and the phenomenal. For example, on one version of the view, phenomenal properties are the categorical bases of fundamental physical properties, such as mass and charge, which are dispositional. Russellian monism has prominent supporters, such as Bertrand Russell, Grover Maxwell, Michael Lockwood, and David Chalmers. But its strengths and shortcomings are often misunderstood. In this paper we try to eliminate confusions about the view and defend it (...)
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  19. Howard M. Robinson (ed.) (1993). Objections to Physicalism. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Physicalism has, over the past twenty years, become almost an orthodoxy, especially in the philosophy of mind. Many philosophers, however, feel uneasy about this development, and this volume is intended as a collective response to it. Together these papers, written by philosophers from Britain, the United States, and Australasia, show that physicalism faces enormous problems in every area in which it is discussed. The contributors not only investigate the well-known difficulties that physicalism has in accommodating sensory consciousness, but also bring (...)
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  20. David Gordon (1984). Special Relativity and the Location of Mental Events. Analysis 44 (June):126-127.score: 18.0
  21. David Pearce, Mind, Brain and the Quantum.score: 12.0
    Does introspection grant us privileged insight into the intrinsic nature of the stuff of the world? Michael Lockwood 's startling answer is yes. Quantum mechanics may indeed supply a complete formal description of the universe. Yet what "breathes fire into" the quantum-theoretic equations, it transpires, isn't physical in the traditional sense at all.
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