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  1. Kirsten Austad, David H. Brendel & Rebecca W. Brendel (2010). Financial Conflicts of Interest and the Ethical Obligations of Medical School Faculty and the Profession. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 53 (4):534-544.
    Interactions between medicine and the pharmaceutical and device industries have become widespread in medicine. Despite their promise for improving patient care through innovation, there are ways in which these relationships may compromise patient care by creating conflicts of interest for physicians—both actual and perceived—that may result in delivery of poorly justified treatment, mistrust of doctors by the public, and an undermining of the integrity of the medical profession (IOM 2009). Conflicts of interest can arise in all arenas of medicine, due (...)
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  2. David H. Brendel & Franklin G. Miller (2008). A Plea for Pragmatism in Clinical Research Ethics. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (4):24 – 31.
    Pragmatism is a distinctive approach to clinical research ethics that can guide bioethicists and members of institutional review boards (IRBs) as they struggle to balance the competing values of promoting medical research and protecting human subjects participating in it. After defining our understanding of pragmatism in the setting of clinical research ethics, we show how a pragmatic approach can provide guidance not only for the day-to-day functioning of the IRB, but also for evaluation of policy standards, such as the one (...)
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  3. David H. Brendel (2007). Beyond Engel: Clinical Pragmatism as the Foundation of Psychiatric Practice. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (4):pp. 311-313.
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  4. David H. Brendel (2007). Psychophysical Causation and a Pragmatist Approach to Human Behavior. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):pp. 205-207.
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  5. David H. Brendel (2006). Psychotherapy and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission: The Dialectic of Individual and Collective Healing. In Nancy Potter (ed.), Trauma, Truth and Reconciliation: Healing Damaged Relationships. Oup Oxford. 15--27.
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  6. Julieta Bleichmar Holman & David H. Brendel (2006). The Ethics of Palliative Care in Psychiatry. Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (4):333.
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  7. David H. Brendel (2003). Reductionism, Eclecticism, and Pragmatism in Psychiatry: The Dialectic of Clinical Explanation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (5 & 6):563 – 580.
    Explanatory models in psychiatry reflect what clinicians deem valuable in rendering people's behavior intelligible and thus help guide treatment choices for mental illnesses. This article outlines some key scientific and ethical principles of clinical explanation in twenty-first century psychiatry. Recent work in philosophy of science, clinical psychiatry, and psychiatric ethics are critically reviewed in order to elucidate conceptual underpinnings of contemporary explanatory models. Many explanatory models in psychiatry are reductionistic or eclectic. The former restrict options for diagnostic and therapeutic (...)
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  8. David H. Brendel (2003). A Pragmatic Consideration of the Relation Between Depression and Melancholia. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (1):53-55.