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Profile: David Haekwon Kim (University of San Francisco)
  1. David Haekwon Kim & Ronald Sundstrom (2014). Xenophobia and Racism. Critical Philosophy of Race 2 (1).
    Xenophobia is conceptually distinct from racism. Xenophobia is also distinct from nativism. Furthermore, theories of racism are largely ensconced in nationalized narratives of racism, often influenced by the black-white binary, which obscures xenophobia and shelters it from normative critiques. This paper addresses these claims, arguing for the first and last, and outlining the second. Just as philosophers have recently analyzed the concept of racism, clarifying it and pinpointing why it’s immoral and the extent of its moral harm, so we will (...)
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  2. David Haekwon Kim, Emily S. Lee, Eduardo Mendieta, Mickaella Perina & Falguni A. Sheth (2012). An Unruly Theory of Race. [REVIEW] Hypatia 27 (3):898 - 902.
  3. Lewis R. Gordon, Jorge J. E. Gracia, Randall Halle, David Haekwon Kim, Sarah Lucia Hoagland, Lucius T. Outlaw, Nancy Tuana & Dale Turner (2007). Philosophy in Multiple Voices. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  4. Lewis R. Gordon, Jorge J. E. Gracia, Randall Halle, David Haekwon Kim, Sarah Lucia Hoagland, Lucius T. Outlaw, Nancy Tuana & Dale Turner (2007). Philosophy in Multiple Voices. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  5. David Haekwon Kim (2004). The Place of American Empire: Amerasian Territories and Late American Modernity. Philosophy and Geography 7 (1):95-121.
    Imperialism rarely receives discussion in mainstream philosophy. In radical philosophy, where imperialism is analyzed with some frequency, European expansion is the paradigm. This essay considers the nature and specificity of American imperialism, especially its racialization structures, diplomatic history, and geographic trajectory, from pre?twentieth century ?Amerasia? to present?day Eurasia. The essay begins with an account of imperialism generally, one which is couched in language consistent with left?liberalism but compatible with a more radical discourse. This account is then used throughout the rest (...)
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