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David Hodgson [32]David A. Hodgson [1]
  1. David Hodgson, Why I (Still) Believe in Free Will and Responsibility.
    David Hodgson[1] It’s widely asserted by scientists and philosophers that our decisions and actions are wholly determined by physical processes of our brains; and many also assert that this means we cannot have free will and cannot, in any real sense, be responsible for what we do. In recent times, this has led to some questioning of the basis of criminal..
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  2. David Hodgson, Guilty Mind or Guilty Brain? Criminal Responsibility in the Age of Neuroscience.
    Current developments in the sciences of the brain and mind sometimes seem to suggest that criminal conduct is a symptom of brain disorder or illness that should be treated rather than punished. This paper argues that the insights of these sciences should be taken very seriously by lawyers, but not to the detriment of common-sense ideas of responsibility or of their incorporation into the legal categories used in the criminal law.
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  3. David Hodgson, Goodbye to Qualia and All That.
    Max Bennett is a distinguished Australian neuroscientist, Peter Hacker an Oxford philosopher and a leading authority on Wittgenstein. A book resulting from their collaboration (M. R. Bennett and P. M. S. Hacker, Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience, Oxford: Blackwell, 2003) has received high praise. According to the Blackwell website, G. H. von Wright asserts that it ‘will certainly, for a long time to come, be the most important contribution to the mind-body problem that there is’; and Sir Anthony Kenny says it (...)
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  4. David Hodgson, Responsibility and Good Reasons.
     I have argued elsewhere that respect for human rights requires a robust notion of responsibility, and that this in turn depends on folk-psychological ideas including free will; and also that such ideas need to be articulated in such a way that they can be used in combination with contemporary science in the development of the criminal law. Stephen J. Morse contends that responsibility is explained by our capacity to grasp and be guided by good reasons, and that this (...)
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  5. David Hodgson, Review of John R. Searle Rationality in Action. [REVIEW]
    In this book, John Searle makes a significant contribution to the philosophy of rational action, and its implications for the problem of free will. The book also marks a change in Searle’s thinking since his 1992 book The Rediscovery of the Mind , particularly in that he now leaves open, as a reasonable possibility, that consciousness may be able to cause things that cannot be fully explained by the causal behaviour of neurons: for me, a step in the right direction (...)
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  6. David Hodgson, Dawkins and the Morality of the Bible.
    They have not given much attention to something I think is significant in the book, namely its clear and forceful criticism of the morality of aspects of major religions, including Christianity and Judaism, criticism that deserves to be taken seriously by reasonable adherents of these religions.
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  7. David Hodgson, Letter Responding to Comments on Dawkins Article.
    Responses to my article on Dawkins and God (May 2007) have fallen into two classes: those that challenge my criticism of Dawkins’ atheism, and those that challenge my criticism of the morality on display in some Bible stories. I will briefly respond to those in the first class, and then those in the second class. P. J. Moss suggests I am attracted to “the Cartesian notion of mind body dualism,” and do not have regard to “the work of those philosophers (...)
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  8. David Hodgson, The Conway-Kochen 'Free Will Theorem' and Unscientific Determinism.
    One has it that earlier circumstances and the laws of nature uniquely determine later circumstances, and the other has it that past present and future all exist tenselessly in a ‘block universe,’ so that the passage of time and associated changes in the world are illusions or at best merely apparent.
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  9. David Hodgson (2012). Identifying and Reconciling Two Images of “Man”. Humana.Mente - Journal of Philosophical Studies 21.
    Fifty years ago the philosopher Wilfred Sellars identified two images of “man”, which he called respectively the “manifest image” and the “scientific image”; and he considered whether and how these two images could be reconciled. In this paper, I will very briefly look at the distinction drawn by Sellars and at his suggestions for reconciliation of these images. I will suggest that a broad distinction as suggested by Sellars can indeed usefully be drawn, but that the distinction can be more (...)
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  10. David Hodgson (2012). Rationality + Consciousness = Free Will. OUP USA.
    In recent years, philosophical discussions of free will have focused largely on whether or not free will is compatible with determinism. In this challenging book, David Hodgson takes a fresh approach to the question of free will, contending that close consideration of human rationality and human consciousness shows that together they give us free will, in a robust and indeterministic sense. In particular, they give us the capacity to respond appositely to feature-rich gestalts of conscious experiences, in ways that are (...)
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  11. David Hodgson (2009). Criminal Responsibility, Free Will, and Neuroscience. In. In Nancey Murphy, George Ellis, O. ’Connor F. R. & Timothy (eds.), Downward Causation and the Neurobiology of Free Will. Springer Verlag. 227--241.
  12. David Hodgson (2009). Review of John Martin Fischer, Our Stories: Essays on Life, Death, and Free Will. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (9).
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  13. David Hodgson (2008). A Role for Consciousness. Philosophy Now 65:22-24.
             Many scientists and philosophers would answer nothing. According to them, the physical world operates in accordance with the laws of physics, chemistry and biology, and is closed to being affected by anything non-physical.  Thus, any effects that conscious experiences may have can only come about by virtue of physical brain processes that are associated with and perhaps constitute these experiences.          This physicalist (...)
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  14. David Hodgson (2008). The Knowledge Argument: A Response to Elizabeth Schier. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (4):112-115.
    I much appreciated Elizabeth Schier's paper on Frank Jackson's knowledge argument, published in the January 2008 issue of Journal of Consciousness Studies (Schier, 2008) -- in part, I confess, because of resonances with my gestalt argument for free will (Hodgson, 2001; 2002; 2005; 2007a,b). I would like to offer two comments on this paper.
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  15. David Hodgson (2007). Ethics: Caring for Children and Young People. In Audrey Leathard & Susan Goodinson-McLaren (eds.), Ethics: Contemporary Challenges in Health and Social Care. Policy Press. 213.
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  16. David Hodgson (2007). Making Our Own Luck. Ratio 20 (3):278–292.
    It has been contended that we can never be truly responsible for anything we do: we do what we do because of the way we are, so we cannot be responsible for what we do unless we are responsible for the way we are; and we cannot be responsible for the way we are when we first make decisions in life, so we can never become responsible for the way we are later in life. This article argues that in our (...)
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  17. David Hodgson (2005). A Plain Person's Free Will. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (1):3-19.
    In my experience, plain persons (here meaning persons who are neither philosophers or cognitive scientists) tend to accept something like a libertarian position on free will, namely that free will exists and is inconsistent with determinism. That position is widely debunked by philosophers and cognitive scientists. My view at present is that something like this plain person's position is not only defensible but likely to be closer to the truth than opposing views. To put this to the test, I have (...)
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  18. David Hodgson (2005). Goodbye to Qualia and All That? Review Article. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (2):84-88.
    Max Bennett is a distinguished Australian neuroscientist, Peter Hacker an Oxford philosopher and leading authority on Wittgenstein. A book resulting from their collaboration, Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience, has received high praise. According to the Blackwell website, G.H. von Wright asserts that it 'will certainly, for a long time to come, be the most important contribution to the mind-body problem that there is'; and Sir Anthony Kenny says it 'shows that the claims made on behalf of cognitive science are ill-founded'. (...)
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  19. David Hodgson (2005). Response to Commentators. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (1):76-95.
    I am very grateful to the commentators for their consideration of my target article. I found their comments thought-provoking and challenging, but I am not persuaded that any substantial departure is required from the views I expressed in the article. I will respond to each comment in turn, and then I will briefly review how my nine propositions have fared.
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  20. David Hodgson (2002). Consciousness, Quantum Physics, and Free Will. In Robert H. Kane (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Free Will. Oxford University Press.
  21. David Hodgson (2002). Physics, Consciousness and Free Will. In Robert H. Kane (ed.), The Oxford Handbook on Free Will. Oxford University Press.
  22. David Hodgson (2002). Quantum Physics, Consciousness, and Free Will. In Robert H. Kane (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Free Will. New York: Oxford University Press.
  23. David Hodgson (2002). Three Tricks of Consciousness: Qualia, Chunking and Selection. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (12):65-88.
    DAVID HODGSON Abstract: This article supports the proposition that, if a judgment about the aesthetic merits of an artistic object can take into account and thereby be influenced by the particular quality of the object, through gestalt experiences evoked by the object, then we have free will. It argues that it is probable that such a judgment can indeed take into account and be influenced by the particular quality of the object through gestalt experiences evoked by it, so as to (...)
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  24. David Hodgson (2001). Constraint, Empowerment, and Guidance: A Conjectural Classification of Laws of Nature. Philosophy 76 (3):341-370.
    This paper introduces a conjecture that laws of nature may be of different kinds, in particular that there may, in addition to laws which constrain outcomes (C-laws), be laws which empower systems to direct or select outcomes (E-laws) and laws which guide systems in such selections (G-laws). The paper defends this conjecture by suggesting that it is not excluded by anything we know, is plausible, and is potentially of great explanatory power.
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  25. David Hodgson (1999). Hume's Mistake. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (8-9):201-24.
    Hume claimed that anything that happens must either be causally determined or a matter of chance, and that a person is responsible only for choices caused by the person’s character; so that if any sense is to made of free will and responsibility, it must be on the basis that they are compatible with determinism.
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  26. David Hodgson (1998). Folk Psychology, Science, and the Criminal Law. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness Ii. Mit Press.
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  27. David Hodgson (1996). Nonlocality, Local Indeterminism, and Consciousness. Ratio 9 (1):1-22.
  28. David Hodgson (1996). The Easy Problems Ain't so Easy. Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (1):69-75.
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  29. David Hodgson (1995). Probability: The Logic of the Law—a Response. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 15 (1):51-68.
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  30. David Hodgson (1994). Neuroscience and Folk Psychology: An Overview. Journal of Consciousness Studies 1 (2):205-216.
  31. David Hodgson (1994). Why Searle has Not Rediscovered the Mind. Journal of Consciousness Studies 1 (2):264-274.
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  32. David Hodgson (1991). The Mind Matters: Consciousness and Choice in a Quantum World. Oxford Unversity Press.
    In this book, Hodgson presents a clear and compelling case against today's orthodox mechanistic view of the brain-mind, and in favor of the view that "the mind matters." In the course of the argument he ranges over such topics as consciousness, informal reasoning, computers, evolution, and quantum indeterminancy and non-locality. Although written from a philosophical viewpoint, the book has important implications for the sciences concerned with the brain-mind problem. At the same time, it is largely non-technical, and thus accessible to (...)
     
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  33. Walter Weiss & David A. Hodgson (1963). Influence of Unbalanced Response Scales on Size Judgments. Journal of Experimental Psychology 66 (1):37.
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