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David L. Hull [104]David Hull [28]David Lee Hull [1]
  1. David L. Hull, Evolutionists Red in Tooth and Claw.
    ust-jackets are frequently adorned by quotations from famous people praising the book. At first glance, Andrew Brown's The Darwin Wars is no exception. Pithy quotations from Steve Jones, Richard Dawkins, John Maynard Smith, Stephen Jay Gould and Daniel Dennett. Who could ask for more? However, on closer inspection these quotations turn out not to be about Brown's book at all, but quotations that Brown uses in his book. Only Dennett's blurb refers to one of Brown's own publications: "What a (...)
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  2. David L. Hull & S. John (forthcoming). Wilkins. 2005–. Replication. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  3. David L. Hull (2011). Defining Darwinism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 42 (1):2-4.
    Evolutionary theory seems to lend itself to all sorts of misunderstanding. In this paper I strive to decrease such confusions, for example, between Darwinism and Darwinians, propositions and people, organisms and individuals, species as individuals versus species as classes, homologies and homoplasies, and finally essences versus histories.
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  4. David L. Hull (2009). The Logic Behind the Science. BioScience 59 (4):348-349.
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  5. David L. Hull (2009). The Logic Behind the Science:Evidence and Evolution: The Logic Behind the Science. Elliott Sober . Cambridge University Press, 2008. 412 Pp., Illus. $29.99 (ISBN 9780521692748 Paper). [REVIEW] BioScience 59 (4):348-349.
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  6. David Hull, Replication. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  7. David L. Hull (2008). Leon Croizat: A Radical Biogeographer. In Oren Harman & Michael Dietrich (eds.), Rebels, Mavericks, and Heretics in Biology. Yale University Press. 194.
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  8. David L. Hull (2008). Review of Stephen H. Kellert, Helen E. Longino, C. Kenneth Waters (Eds.), Scientific Pluralism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (5).
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  9. David L. Hull (2008). The History of the Philosophy of Biology. In Michael Ruse (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Biology. Oxford University Press. 11--33.
     
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  10. David Hull (2007). La natura umana [On human nature]. la Società Degli Individui 28:109-126.
    Per generazioni i filosofi hanno sostenuto che gli esseri umani sono essen­zialmente identici – che condividono, cioè, la stessa natura – e che questa somiglianza essenziale è estremamente importante. Periodicamente, i filo­sofi hanno proposto di fondare l’essenziale identità degli esseri umani sulla biologia. Nel saggio viene difesa la tesi secondo cui se, quando si parla di ‘biologia’, ci si riferisce ai pronunciamenti tecnici dei biologi di profes­sione – in particolare dei biologi evoluzionisti – semplicemente non è vero che tutti gli (...)
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  11. David Hull (2007). The Altruism Equation: Seven Scientists Search for the Origins of Goodness. [REVIEW] Isis 98:373-373.
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  12. David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.) (2007). The Cambridge Companion to the Philosophy of Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    The philosophy of biology is one of the most exciting new areas in the field of philosophy and one that is attracting much attention from working scientists. This Companion, edited by two of the founders of the field, includes newly commissioned essays by senior scholars and up-and-coming younger scholars who collectively examine the main areas of the subject - the nature of evolutionary theory, classification, teleology and function, ecology, and the problematic relationship between biology and religion, among other topics. Up-to-date (...)
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  13. David Hull (2006). The Epistemology of Development, Evolution, and Genetics: Selected Essays. [REVIEW] Isis 97:192-193.
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  14. David L. Hull (2006). The Essence of Scientific Theories. Biological Theory 1 (1):17-19.
  15. David Hull (2005). Review of Marjorie Grene, David Depew, The Philosophy of Biology: An Episodic History. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (1).
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  16. David L. Hull (2005). Deconstructing Darwin: Evolutionary Theory in Context. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 38 (1):137 - 152.
    The topic of this paper is external versus internal explanations, first, of the genesis of evolutionary theory and, second, its reception. Victorian England was highly competitive and individualistic. So was the view of society promulgated by Malthus and the theory of evolution set out by Charles Darwin and A.R. Wallace. The fact that Darwin and Wallace independently produced a theory of evolution that was just as competitive and individualistic as the society in which they lived is taken as evidence for (...)
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  17. David Hull (2004). Ernst Mayr y la filosofía de la biología. Ludus Vitalis 12:35-42.
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  18. David L. Hull (2004). Etienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, 1772-1844: A Visionary Naturalist (review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 47 (3):463-464.
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  19. David L. Hull (2004). Niche Construction: The Neglected Process in Evolution (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 47 (2):314-316.
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  20. David L. Hull (2004). Complexity, Design, and Natural Selection. BioScience 54 (2):162.
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  21. David L. Hull & Sigrid S. Glenn (2004). Multiply Concurrent Replication. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):902-904.
    If selection is interpreted as involving repeated cycles of replication, variation, and environmental interaction so structured that environmental interaction causes replication to be differential, then selection in gene-based biological evolution and the reaction of the immune system to antigens are relatively unproblematic examples of selection processes. Operant learning and cultural evolution pose more serious problems. In this response we deal with operant learning as a selection process. Footnotes1 The authors regretfully inform readers that since the publication of our target article (...)
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  22. David L. Hull, Rodney E. Langman, Sigrid S. Glenn & Liane Gabora (2004). Commentary On: A General Account of Selection: Biology, Immunology, and Behavior. Authors' Reply. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):901-904.
     
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  23. David L. Hull (2003). Book Review: In Darwin's Shadow: The Life and Science of Alfred Russel Wallace. [REVIEW] Bioessays 25 (8):822-823.
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  24. David L. Hull (2003). Darwin's Science and Victorian Philosophy of Science. In J. Hodges & Gregory Radick (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Darwin. Cambridge University Press. 168--191.
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  25. David Hull (2002). Radical Solutions to Old Problems. BioScience 52 (3):299.
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  26. David L. Hull (2002). David Wasserman and Robert Wachbroit, Eds., Genetics and Criminal Behavior:Genetics and Criminal Behavior. Ethics 113 (1):185-187.
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  27. David L. Hull (2002). The Social Responsibility of Professional Societies. Metaphilosophy 33 (5):552-565.
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  28. David L. Hull (2002). A Career in the Glare of Public Acclaim. BioScience 52 (9):837.
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  29. David L. Hull (2002). A Portrait of Biology. In R. E. Auxier & L. E. Hahn (eds.), The Philosophy of Marjorie Grene. La Salle, Illinois: Open Court. 259--278.
     
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  30. David L. Hull (2002). Recent Philosophy of Biology: A Review. Acta Biotheoretica 50 (2):117-128.
    Academia is subdivided into separate disciplines, most of which are quite discrete. In this review I trace the interactions between two of these disciplines: biology and philosophy of biology. I concentrate on those topics that have the most extensive biological content: function, species, systematics, selection, reduction and development. In the final section of this paper I touch briefly on those issues that biologists and philosophers have addressed that do not have much in the way of biological content.
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  31. Marc Van Regenmortel & David Hull (eds.) (2002). Promises and Limits of Reductionism in the Biomedical Sciences. J. Wiley and Sons.
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  32. Cecilia Heyes & David L. Hull (eds.) (2001). Selection Theory and Social Construction: The Evolutionary Naturalistic Epistemology of Donald T. Campbell. State University of New York Press.
    Top scholars examine the work of Donald T. Campbell, one of the first to emphasize the social structure of science.
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  33. David L. Hull (2001). The Role of Theories in Biological Systematics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (2):221-238.
    The role of scientific theories in classifying plants and animals is traced from Hennig's phylogenetics and the evolutionary taxonomy of Simpson and Mayr, through numerical phenetics, to present-day cladistics. Hennig limited biological classification to sister groups so that this one relation can be expressed unambiguously in classifications. Simpson and Mayr were willing to sacrifice precision in representation in order to include additional features of evolution in the construction of classifications. In order to make classifications more objective, precise and quantitative, numerical (...)
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  34. David L. Hull (2001). Michael Ruse and His Fifteen Years of Booknotes – for Better or for Worse. Biology and Philosophy 16 (3):423-435.
    In this paper I trace Michael Ruse's Booknotes from the first volumeof Biology and Philosophy in 1986 to the present. I deal withboth the style and the content of these booknotes. Ruse paid specialattention to authors outside of the traditional English axis as wellas to feminist writers. He complained that too much attention wasbeing paid to certain topics (e.g., evolutionary ethics, evolutionaryepistemology, the species problem and reduction) while other, moreimportant topics were all but ignored (e.g., natural selection,population genetics, levels of (...)
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  35. David L. Hull (2001). Science and Selection: Essays on Biological Evolution and the Philosophy of Science. Cambridge University Press.
    One way to understand science is as a selection process. David Hull, one of the dominant figures in contemporary philosophy of science, sets out in this volume a general analysis of this selection process that applies equally to biological evolution, the reaction of the immune system to antigens, operant learning, and social and conceptual change in science. Hull aims to distinguish between those characteristics that are contingent features of selection and those that are essential. Science and Selection brings together many (...)
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  36. David L. Hull (2001). The Success of Science and Social Norms. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 23 (3/4):341 - 360.
    In this paper I characterize science in terms of both invisible hand social organization and selection. These two processes are responsible for different features of science. Individuals working in isolation cannot produce much in the way of the warranted knowledge. Individual biases severely limit how much secure knowledge an individual can generate on his or her own. Individuals working in consort are required, but social groups can be organized in many different ways. The key feature of the social organization in (...)
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  37. David L. Hull, Rodney E. Langman & Sigrid S. Glenn (2001). A General Account of Selection: Biology, Immunology, and Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):511-528.
    Authors frequently refer to gene-based selection in biological evolution, the reaction of the immune system to antigens, and operant learning as exemplifying selection processes in the same sense of this term. However, as obvious as this claim may seem on the surface, setting out an account of “selection” that is general enough to incorporate all three of these processes without becoming so general as to be vacuous is far from easy. In this target article, we set out such a general (...)
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  38. David L. Hull, Rodney E. Langman & Sigrid S. Glenn (2001). At Last: Serious Consideration. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):559-569.
    For a long time, several natural phenomena have been considered unproblematically selection processes in the same sense of “selection.” In our target article we dealt with three of these phenomena: gene-based selection in biological evolution, the reaction of the immune system to antigens, and operant learning. We characterize selection in terms of three processes (variation, replication, and environmental interaction) resulting in the evolution of lineages via differential replication. Our commentators were largely supportive with respect to variation and environmental interaction but (...)
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  39. David L. Hull (2000). The Professionalization of Science Studies: Cutting Some Slack. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 15 (1):61-91.
    During the past hundred years or so, those scholars studying science have isolated themselves as much as possible from scientists as well as from workers in other disciplines who study science. The result of this effort is history of science, philosophy of science and sociology of science as separate disciplines. I argue in this paper that now is the time for these disciplinary boundaries to be lowered or at least made more permeable so that a unified discipline of Science Studies (...)
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  40. David L. Hull (2000). Why Did Darwin Fail? The Role of John Stuart Mill. In Richard Creath & Jane Maienschein (eds.), Biology and Epistemology. Cambridge University Press. 48.
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  41. Kim Sterelny, Paul E. Griffiths, David L. Hull, Michael Ruse & Jane Maienschein (2000). Sex and Death: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Biology. Journal of the History of Biology 33 (1):181-187.
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  42. David Hull (1999). On the Plurality of Species: Questioning the Party Line. In R. Wilson (ed.), Species: New Interdisciplinary Essays. MIT Press. 23-48.
  43. David L. Hull (1999). Interdisciplinary Dissonance. In D. Medin & S. Atran (eds.), Folkbiology. Mit Press. 477--500.
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  44. David L. Hull (1999). Steven Rose's Alternative to Ultra-Darwinism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):896-896.
    Stephen Rose's formulation of evolutionary theory is too scattered and impressionistic to serve as a genuine alternative to ultra- Darwinism. In addition, he has muddied a distinction that is crucial to our understanding of evolutionary phenomenona – the distinction between homologies and homoplasies.
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  45. David L. Hull (1999). The Use and Abuse of Sir Karl Popper. Biology and Philosophy 14 (4):481-504.
    Karl Popper has been one of the few philosophers of sciences who has influenced scientists. I evaluate Popper's influence on our understanding of evolutionary theory from his earliest publications to the present. Popper concluded that three sorts of statements in evolutionary biology are not genuine laws of nature. I take him to be right on this score. Popper's later distinction between evolutionary theory as a metaphysical research program and as a scientific theory led more than one scientist to misunderstand his (...)
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  46. David Hull (1998). Species, Subspecies, and Races. Social Research 65.
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  47. David Hull (1998). Taxonomy. In Edward Craig (ed.), Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Routledge. 272-6.
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  48. David L. Hull (1998). A Clash of Paradigms or the Sound of One Hand Clapping. Biology and Philosophy 13 (4):587-595.
  49. David L. Hull (1998). 'Introduction to Part V. In David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.), The Philosophy of Biology. Oxford University Press. 295--299.
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  50. David L. Hull (1998). Review. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (3):511-514.
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