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Profile: David Leslie Harold Hunter (University of Birmingham)
Profile: David Hunter (Ryerson University)
  1. David Hunter, Demonstrative Belief and Dispositions.
    forthcoming in Journal of Philosophical Research. This paper argues against David Armstrong’s view that singular beliefs are not dispositions. It also begins to develop the view that self-conscious belief is a matter of belief revision.
     
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  2. David Hunter, Tis but a Scratch: The Human Tissue Act and the Use of Tissue for Research, Issues for Research Ethics Committees.
    The Human Tissue Act 2004 in the United Kingdom clearly represents not a principled approach but instead a compromise, a pragmatic approach which balances several different ethical considerations against each other. In regards to the use of tissue in research it has left much of the more difficult decisions to be made by research ethics committees on a case by case basis. In particular it is now the role of research ethics committees to decide whether research can be carried out (...)
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  3. David Hunter (2014). Can Research Ethics Committees Stop Unethical International Trials? Research Ethics 10 (2):66-68.
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  4. David Hunter (2014). SUPPORT Case Commentary. Research Ethics 10 (1):60-61.
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  5. David Hunter & Gurpreet Rattan (2014). Introduction. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 43 (5-6):515-517.
    (2013). Introduction. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 43, Essays on the Nature of Propositions, pp. 515-517.
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  6. David Hunter (2013). Can the Regulatory Response to SUPPORT Be Supported? American Journal of Bioethics 13 (12):37-39.
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  7. David Hunter (2013). Editorial: Research Ethics in Space. Research Ethics 9 (4):150-152.
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  8. David Hunter (2013). How to Object to Radically New Technologies on the Basis of Justice: The Case of Synthetic Biology. Bioethics 27 (8):426-434.
    A recurring objection to the exploration, development and deployment of radical new technologies is based on their implications with regards to social justice. In this article, using synthetic biology as an example, I explore this line of objection and how we ought to think about justice in the context of the development and introduction of radically new technologies. I argue that contrary to popular opinion, justice rarely provides a reason not to investigate, develop and introduce radical new technologies, although it (...)
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  9. David Hunter (2013). Life Support. Research Ethics 9 (4):187-188.
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  10. David Hunter (2013). Refrigerator Safety Study. Research Ethics 9 (1):44-45.
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  11. David Hunter (2013). Webnote: The Work of Phase I Ethics Committees: Expert and Lay Membership. Research Ethics 9 (3):146-146.
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  12. David Hunter (ed.) (2012). Belief and Agency. Calgary University Press.
  13. David Hunter (2012). Editorial: Could Informed Consent Be Harmful? – the Problem of the Nocebo Effect. Research Ethics 8 (3):151-153.
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  14. David Hunter (2012). Editorial: The Publication of Unethical Research. Research Ethics 8 (2):67-70.
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  15. David Hunter (2012). Guidance and Belief. In , Belief and Agency. Calgary University Press. 63-90.
  16. David Hunter (2012). Migraine Research Case–Equipoise. Research Ethics 8 (1):63-64.
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  17. David Hunter (2012). Why Even Inappropriate Parental Consent Might Be Enough to Justify Minimal Risk Pediatric Research Without Clinical Benefit. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (1):35 - 36.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 1, Page 35-36, January 2012.
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  18. David Hunter (2011). Alienated Belief. Dialectica 65 (2):221-240.
    This paper argues that it is possible to knowingly believe something while judging that one ought not to believe it and (so) viewing the belief as manifesting a sort of failure. I offer examples showing that such ‘alienated belief’ has several potential sources. I contrast alienated belief with self-deception, incontinent (or akratic) belief and half-belief. I argue that the possibility of alienated belief is compatible with the so-called ‘transparency’ of first-person reflection on belief, and that the descriptive and expressive difficulties (...)
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  19. David Hunter (2011). Belief Ascription and Context Dependence. Philosophy Compass 6 (12):902-911.
  20. David Hunter (2011). Editor's Choice Issue 3, 2011. Research Ethics 7 (3):81-81.
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  21. David Hunter (2011). Facebook Recruitment: A Hypothetical Study. Research Ethics 7 (1):28-28.
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  22. David Hunter (2011). Finding True Love Online. Research Ethics 7 (2):71-71.
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  23. David Hunter (2011). New Beginnings — Part Two. Research Ethics 7 (4):119-119.
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  24. David Hunter (2011). Risks Versus Benefits is Like Apples Versus Oranges. Research Ethics 7 (3):79-80.
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  25. David Hunter & Sarah Edwards (2011). New Beginnings. Research Ethics 7 (1):1-3.
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  26. Susan Ashbrook Harvey & David G. Hunter (eds.) (2010). The Oxford Handbook of Early Christian Studies. OUP Oxford.
    The Oxford Handbook of Early Christian Studies responds to and celebrates the explosion of research in this inter-disciplinary field over recent decades. As a one-volume reference work, it provides an introduction to the academic study of early Christianity (c. 100-600 AD) and examines the vast geographical area impacted by the early church, in Western and Eastern late antiquity. It is thematically arranged to encompass history, literature, thought, practices, and material culture. It contains authoritative and up-to-date surveys of current thinking and (...)
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  27. David Hunter (2010). Is There a Case for a Distinction Between Ethics and Policy? American Journal of Bioethics 10 (6):24-25.
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  28. David Hunter & James Wilson (2010). Research Exceptionalism. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):45-54.
    Research involving human subjects is much more stringently regulated than many other nonresearch activities that appear to be at least as risky. A number of prominent figures now argue that research is overregulated. We argue that the reasons typically offered to justify the present system of research regulation fail to show that research should be subject to more stringent regulation than other equally risky activities. However, there are three often overlooked reasons for thinking that research should be treated as a (...)
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  29. David Hunter & James Wilson (2010). Responses to Open Peer Commentaries on “Research Exceptionalism”. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):W4-W6.
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  30. James Wilson & David Hunter (2010). Research Exceptionalism. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):45-54.
    Research involving human subjects is much more stringently regulated than many other nonresearch activities that appear to be at least as risky. A number of prominent figures now argue that research is overregulated. We argue that the reasons typically offered to justify the present system of research regulation fail to show that research should be subject to more stringent regulation than other equally risky activities. However, there are three often overlooked reasons for thinking that research should be treated as a (...)
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  31. James Wilson & David Hunter (2010). Responses to Open Peer Commentaries on “Research Exceptionalism”. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):W4-W6.
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  32. David Hunter (2009). Beliefs and Dispositions. Journal of Philosophical Research 34:243-262.
    This paper is about the dispositional difference that demonstrative and indexical beliefs make. More specifically, it is about the dispositional difference between my believing that NN is P (where I am NN) and my believing that I, myself, am P. Identifying a dispositional difference in this kind of case is especially challenging because those beliefs have the very same truth conditions. My question is this: how can a difference in belief that makes no difference to one’s conception of the world (...)
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  33. David Hunter (2008). Belief and Self-Consciousness. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (5):673 – 693.
    This paper is about what is distinctive about first-person beliefs. I discuss several sets of puzzling cases of first-person belief. The first focus on the relation between belief and action, while the second focus on the relation of belief to subjectivity. I argue that in the absence of an explanation of the dispositional difference, individuating such beliefs more finely than truth conditions merely marks the difference. I argue that the puzzles reveal a difference in the ways that I am disposed (...)
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  34. David Hunter (2008). Bioethics and Vulnerability: A Latin American View – by Florencia Luna. Developing World Bioethics 8 (3):242-243.
  35. David Hunter (2008). Self-Consciousness - by Sebastian Rödl. Philosophical Books 49 (3):272-274.
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  36. David Hunter (2007). Common Ground and Modal Disagreement. In H. V. Hanson (ed.), Dissensus and the Search for Common Ground. 134-143.
    The common ground in an inquiry consists of what the participants agree on, at least for the sake of the inquiry. The relations between the factual and linguistic components of common ground are notoriously difficult to trace. I clarify them by exploring how modal disagreements – disagreements about how things might be – interact with the linguistic and the factual common ground. I argue that modal agreement is essential to common ground of any kind.
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  37. David Hunter (2007). Contextualism, Skepticism and Objectivity. In R. Stainton & C. Viger (eds.), Compositionality. Context, and Semantic Values.
    In this paper, I try to make sense of the idea that true knowledge attributions characterize something that is more valuable than true belief and that survives even if, as Contextualism implies, contextual changes make it no longer identifiable by a knowledge attribution. I begin by sketching a familiar, pragmatic picture of assertion that helps us to understand and predict how the words “S knows that P” can be used to draw different epistemic distinctions in different contexts. I then argue (...)
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  38. David G. Hunter (2007). Entre Joviniano y Jerónimo: Agustín y la interpretación de 1 Cor 7. Augustinus: Revista Trimestral Publicada Por Los Padres Agustinos Recoletos 52 (204):107-112.
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  39. David hunter (2005). Soames and Widescopism. Philosophical Studies 123 (3):231 - 241.
    Widescopism, as I call it, holds that names are synonymous with descriptions that are required to take wide scope over modal adverbs. Scott Soames has recently argued that Widescopism is false. He identifies an argument that is valid but which, he claims, a defender of Widescopism must say has true premises and a false conclusion. I argue, first, that a defender of Widescopism need not in fact say that the target arguments conclusion is false. Soames argument that she must confuses, (...)
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  40. David G. Hunter (2004). Augustine, De Bono Coniugali, De Sancta Uirginitate, Ed. And Trans. P. G. Walsh. (Oxford Early Christian Texts.) Oxford: Clarendon Press; New York: Oxford University Press, 2001. Pp. Xxxv, 164. $60. [REVIEW] Speculum 79 (3):735-736.
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  41. Sven Arvidson, John Barresi, Tim Bayne, Pierre Bovet, Andrew Brook, Andy Clark, Lester Embree, William Friedman, Peter Goldie & David Hunter (2003). Acknowledgement of External Reviewers for 2002. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (95).
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  42. David Hunter (2003). Gabriel Segal's a Slim Book About Narrow Content. Noûs 37 (4):724–745.
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  43. David Hunter (2003). Gabriel Segal, a Slim Book About Narrow Content(Mit Press, 2000), 177 Pp. [REVIEW] Noûs 37 (4):724-745.
    The Mind-Body problem is the problem of saying how a person’s mental states and events relate to his bodily ones. How does Oscar’s believing that water is cold relate to the states of his body? Is it itself a bodily state, perhaps a state of his brain or nervous system? If not, does it nonetheless depend on such states? Or is his believing that water is cold independent of his bodily states? And, crucially, what are the notions of dependence and (...)
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  44. David Hunter (2003). Is Thinking an Action? Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (2):133-148.
    I argue that entertaining a proposition is not an action. Such events do not have intentional explanations and cannot be evaluated as rational or not. In these respects they contrast with assertions and compare well with perceptual events. One can control what one thinks by doing something, most familiarly by reciting a sentence. But even then the event of entertaining the proposition is not an action, though it is an event one has caused to happen, much as one might cause (...)
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  45. David A. Hunter (2003). Consciousness and Conceivability. [REVIEW] Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):285-303.
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  46. David A. Hunter (2003). Review: Consciousness and Conceivability. [REVIEW] Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):285 - 303.
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  47. David G. Hunter (2002). Augustine, Sermon 354A. Augustinian Studies 33 (1):39-60.
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  48. David Hunter (2001). Knowledge and Understanding. Mind and Language 16 (5):542–546.
    Some philosophical proposals seem to die hard. In a recent paper, Jason Stanley has worked to resurrect the description theory of reference, at least as it might apply to natural kind terms like ‘elm’ (Stanley, 1999). The theory’s founding idea is that to understand ‘elm’ one must know a uniquely identifying truth about elms. Famously, Hilary Putnam showed that ordinary users of ‘elm’ may understand it while lacking such knowledge, and may even be unable to distinguish elms from beeches (Putnam, (...)
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  49. David Hunter (2001). Mind-Brain Identity and the Nature of States. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (3):366 – 376.
  50. David Hunter (1999). Rule-Following and Realism. Philosophical Review 108 (3):425-427.
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