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David Ingram [83]David B. Ingram [4]David Bruce Ingram [1]
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Profile: David Ingram (Nottingham University)
  1.  67
    Jonathan Tallant & David Ingram (2015). Nefarious Presentism. Philosophical Quarterly 65 (260):355-371.
    Presentists, who believe that only present objects exist, face a problem concerning truths about the past. Presentists should (but cannot) locate truth-makers for truths about the past. What can presentists say in response? We identify two rival factions ‘upstanding’ and ‘nefarious’ presentists. Upstanding presentists aim to meet the challenge, positing presently existing truth-makers for truths about the past; nefarious presentists aim to shirk their responsibilities, using the language of truth-maker theory but without paying any ontological price. We argue that presentists (...)
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  2. Jonathan Tallant & David Ingram (2012). Time for Distribution? Analysis 72 (2):264-270.
    Presentists face a familiar problem. If only present objects exist, then what 'makes true' our true claims about the past? According to Ross Cameron, the 'truth-makers' for past and future tensed propositions are presently instantiated Temporal Distributional Properties. We present an argument against Cameron's view. There are two ways that we might understand the term 'distribute' as it appears. On one reading, the resulting properties are not up to the task of playing the truth-maker role; on the other, the properties (...)
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  3. Jonathan Tallant & David Ingram (2012). Presentism and Distributional Properties. In Karen Bennett & Dean Zimmerman (eds.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics, Vol. 7. Oxford University Press
    Ross Cameron proposes to reconcile presentism and truth-maker theory by invoking temporal distributional properties, instantiated by present entities, as the truth-makers for truths about the past. This chapter argues that Cameron's proposal fails because objects can change which temporal distributional properties they instantiate and this entails that the truth-values of truths about the past can change in an objectionable way.
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  4.  15
    David Ingram (forthcoming). The Virtues of Thisness Presentism. Philosophical Studies:1-22.
    Presentists believe that only present things exist. But opponents insist this view has unacceptable implications: if only present things exist, we can’t express singular propositions about the past, since the obvious propositional constituents don’t exist, nor can we account for temporal passage, or the openness of the future. According to such opponents, and in spite of the apparent ‘common sense’ status of the view, presentism should be rejected on the basis of these unacceptable implications. In this paper, I present and (...)
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  5. David Ingram (1993). The Copernican Revolution Revisited: Paradigm, Metaphor and Incommensurability in the History of Science- Blumenberg's Response to Kuhn and Davidson. History of the Human Sciences 6 (4):11-35.
  6.  18
    David Ingram (forthcoming). Platonism, Alienation, and Negativity. Erkenntnis:1-13.
    A platonic theory of possibility states that truths about what’s possible are determined by facts about properties not being instantiated. Recently, Matthew Tugby has argued in favour of this sort of theory, arguing that adopting a platonic theory of possibility allows us to solve a paradox concerning alien properties: properties that might have been instantiated, but aren’t actually. In this paper, I raise a worry for Tugby’s proposal—that it commits us to negative facts playing an important truth-making role—and offer a (...)
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  7.  17
    David Ingram (2006). Antidiscrimination, Welfare, and Democracy. Social Theory and Practice 32 (2):213-248.
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  8.  38
    David Ingram (2003). Jürgen Habermas and Hans-Georg Gadamer. In Robert C. Solomon & David L. Sherman (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to Continental Philosophy. Blackwell Pub. 219--242.
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  9. David Ingram (1995). Reason, History, and Politics: The Communitarian Grounds of Legitimation in the Modern Age. State University of New York Press.
    The author shows that conceptions of rationality in current theories of science and law can account for neither the legitimacy of paradigm shifts nor the communitarian integrity internal to paradigms generally. He proposes an alternative conception of rationality that does.
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  10.  1
    David Ingram (1992). [Book Review] Habermas and the Dialectic of Reason. [REVIEW] Social Theory and Practice 18 (3):81-111.
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  11.  34
    David Ingram (2003). Between Political Liberalism and Postnational Cosmopolitanism: Toward an Alternative Theory of Human Rights. Political Theory 31 (3):359-391.
    It is well known that Rawls and Habermas propose different strategies for justifying and classifying human rights. The author argues that neither approach satisfies what he regards as threshold conditions of determinacy, rank ordering, and completeness that any enforceable system of human rights must possess. A related concern is that neither develops an adequate account of group rights, which the author argues fulfills subsidiary conditions for realizing human rights under specific conditions. This latter defect is especially serious in light of (...)
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  12.  7
    David Ingram (2010). Habermas: Introduction and Analysis. Cornell University Press.
    "This is a marvelous resource for anyone interested in better understanding the difficult and voluminous work of jurgen Habermas.
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  13. David Ingram (2004). Rights, Democracy, and Fulfillment in the Era of Identity Politics: Principled Compromises in a Compromised World. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Rights, Democracy, and Fulfillment in the Era of Identity Politics develops a critical theory of human rights and global democracy. Ingram both develops a theory of rights and applies it to a range of concrete and timely issues, such as the persistence of racism in contemporary American society; the emergence of so-called 'whiteness theory;' the failure of identity politics; the tensions between emphases on antidiscrimination and affirmative action in the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990; the great unresolved issues of (...)
     
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  14.  99
    David Ingram (1991). Contractualism, Democracy, and Social Law: Basic Antinomies in Liberal Thought. Philosophy and Social Criticism 17 (4):265-296.
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  15.  10
    David Ingram (1992). New Philosophy of Social Science. By James Bohman. Modern Schoolman 70 (1):63-66.
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  16.  10
    David Ingram (2006). Law: Key Concepts in Philosophy. Continuum.
    Clear, concise and comprehensive, this is the ideal introduction to the philosophy of law for those studying it for the first time.
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  17.  17
    David Ingram (1993). The Limits and Possibilities of Communicative Ethics for Democratic Theory. Political Theory 21 (2):294-321.
  18.  15
    David Ingram, Poverty Knowledge, Coercion, and Social Rights: A Discourse Ethical Contribution to Social Epistemology.
    In today’s America the persistence of crushing poverty in the midst of staggering affluence no longer incites the righteous jeremiads it once did. Resigned acceptance of this paradox is fueled by a sense that poverty lies beyond the moral and technical scope of government remediation. The failure of experts to reach agreement on the causes of poverty merely exacerbates our despair. Are the causes internal to the poor – reflecting their more or less voluntary choices? Or do they emanate from (...)
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  19.  4
    David Ingram, Group Rights: A Defense.
    Human rights belong to individuals in virtue of their common humanity. Yet it is an important question whether human rights entail or comport with the possession of what I call group-specific rights, or rights that individuals possess only because they belong to a particular group. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights says they do. Article 15 asserts the right to nationality, or citizenship. Unless one believes that the only citizenship compatible with a universal human rights regime is cosmopolitan citizenship in (...)
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  20.  1
    David Ingram, How Secular Should Democracy Be? A Cross-Disciplinary Study of Catholicism and Islam in Promoting Public Reason.
    I argue that the same factors that motivated Catholicism to champion liberal democracy are the same that motivate 21st Century Islam to do the same. I defend this claim by linking political liberalism to democratic secularism. Distinguishing institutional, political, and epistemic dimensions of democratic secularism, I show that moderate forms of political and epistemic secularism are most conducive to fostering the kind of public reasoning essential to democratic legitimacy. This demonstration draws upon the ambivalent impact of Indonesia’s Islamic parties in (...)
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  21.  9
    David Ingram (2009). In Defense of Critical Epistemology. Philosophy Today 53 (Supplement):35-43.
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  22.  53
    David Ingram (1990). Dworkin, Habermas, and the Cls Movement on Moral Criticism in Law. Philosophy and Social Criticism 16 (4):237-268.
    CLS advocates renew Marx's critique of liberalism by impugning the rationality of formal rights. Habermas and Dworkin argue against this view, while showing how liberal polity might permit reasonable conflicts between competing principles of right. Their models of legitimate legislation and adjudication, however, presuppose criteria of rationality whose appeal to truth ignores the manner in which law is--and sometimes ought to be--compromised. Hence a weaker version of the CLS critique may be applicable after all. I begin by discussing Weber's exclusion (...)
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  23.  36
    David Ingram (1988). The Retreat of the Political in the Modern Age: Jean-Luc Nancy on Totalitarianism and Community. Research in Phenomenology 18 (1):93-124.
  24.  44
    David B. Ingram (1988). Rights and Privileges: Marx and the Jewish Question. Studies in East European Thought 35 (2):125-145.
  25.  34
    Christian Helmut Wenzel, Catherine Wilson, Andrew Levine & David Ingram (2002). Review of Herbert Marcuse, Douglas Kellner Ed., Towards a Critical Theory of Society: The Collected Papers of Herbert Marcuse: Volume Two. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (1).
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  26.  2
    David B. Ingram (1988). Rights and Privileges: Marx and the Jewish Question. Studies in Soviet Thought 35 (2):125-145.
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  27.  2
    David Ingram, Late Pragmatism, Logical Positivism, and Their Aftermath.
    Developments in Anglo-American philosophy during the first half of the 20th Century closely tracked developments that were occurring in continental philosophy during this period. This should not surprise us. Aside from the fertile communication between these ostensibly separate traditions, both were responding to problems associated with the rise of mass society. Rabid nationalism, corporate statism, and totalitarianism posed a profound challenge to the idealistic rationalism of neo-Kantian and neo-Hegelian philosophies. The decline of the individual – classically conceived by the 18th-century (...)
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  28.  26
    David Ingram (2011). Visible Identities: Race, Gender, and the Self by Linda Alcoff. Constellations 18 (1):106-109.
  29.  28
    David Ingram (2011). Recognition Within the Limits of Reason: Remarks on Pippin's Hegel's Practical Philosophy. Inquiry 53 (5):470-489.
    In Hegel's Practical Philosophy (2008), Robert Pippin argues that Hegel's mature concept of recognition is properly understood as an ontological category referring exclusively to what it means to be a free, rational individual, or agent. 1 I agree with Pippin that recognition for Hegel functions in this capacity. However, I shall argue that conceiving it this way also requires that we conceive it as a political category. Furthermore, while Hegel insists that recognition must be concrete?mediated by actors who hold one (...)
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  30.  27
    David Ingram (2009). Of Sweatshops and Subsistence: Habermas on Human Rights. Ethics and Global Politics 2 (3).
    In this paper I argue that the discourse theoretic account of human rights defended by Jürgen Habermas contains a fruitful tension that is obscured by its dominant tendency to identify rights with legal claims. This weakness in Habermas’s account becomes manifest when we examine how sweatshops diminish the secure enjoyment of subsistence, which Habermas himself (in recognition of the UDHR) recognizes as a human right. Discourse theories of human rights are unique in tying the legitimacy of human rights to democratic (...)
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  31.  6
    David Ingram (1990). Critical Theory and Philosophy. Paragon House.
  32.  8
    David Ingram (1982). The Possibility of a Communication Ethic Reconsidered: Habermas, Gadamer, and Bourdieu on Discourse. [REVIEW] Man and World 15 (2):149-161.
  33.  23
    Oliva Blanchette, Kurt Marko, David Ingram, John W. Murphy, Irving H. Anellis, Vladimir Zeman & Thomas Nemeth (1986). Reviews. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 31 (2):135-137.
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  34. David Ingram (2009). Exceptional Justice? A Discourse Ethical Contribution to the Immigrant Question. Critical Horizons 10 (1):1-30.
     
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  35.  18
    David Ingram (2000). Response to James Swindal and Bill Martin on Reason, History, and Politics. [REVIEW] Human Studies 23 (2):203-210.
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  36.  8
    David Ingram (2006). The Paradox of Democracy. Radical Philosophy Review 9 (2):191-196.
  37.  6
    Michael Weiskopf, John W. Murphy, David Ingram, Oliva Blanchette & Frederick J. Adelmann (1984). Reviews. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 27 (2):175-193.
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  38.  13
    David Ingram (1993). Habermas and the Public Sphere. International Philosophical Quarterly 33 (2):249-250.
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  39.  20
    David Ingram (1997). Review Essay : James L. Marsh, Critique, Action, and Liberation (Albany, Ny: Suny Press, 1995. Philosophy and Social Criticism 23 (5):115-122.
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  40.  19
    David Ingram (2005). Habermas and the Unfinished Project of Democracy. [REVIEW] Human Studies 28 (2):223 - 225.
    This collection of ten essays offers the first systematic assessment of The Philosophical Discourse of Modernity, Jurgen Habermas's masterful defense of the rational potential of the modern age. An opening essay by Maurizio Passerin d'Entreves orients the debate between Habermas and the postmodernists by identifying two different senses of responsibility. Habermas's own essay discusses the themes of his book in the context of a critical engagement with neoconservative cultural and political trends. The main body of essays is divided into two (...)
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  41.  4
    David Ingram, The Structural Injustice of Forced Migration and the Failings of Normative Theory.
    I propose to criticize two strands of argument - contractarian and utilitarian – that liberals have put forth in defense of economic coercion, based on the notion of justifiable paternalism. To illustrate my argument, I appeal to the example of forced labor migration, driven by the exigencies of market forces. In particular, I argue that the forced migration of a special subset of unemployed workers lacking other means of subsistence cannot be redeemed paternalistically as freedom or welfare enhancing in the (...)
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  42.  5
    David Ingram, Irving M. Anellis & John W. Murphy (1988). Reviews. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 35 (1):57-80.
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  43.  16
    David Ingram (2002). Review of Herbert Marcuse, Douglas Kellner Ed., Towards a Critical Theory of Society: The Collected Papers of Herbert Marcuse: Volume Two. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (1).
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  44.  10
    David Ingram (1988). The Postmodern Kantianism of Arendt and Lyotard. Review of Metaphysics 42 (1):51 - 77.
  45.  7
    David Ingram (1998). Postnational Identity. International Studies in Philosophy 30 (2):139-140.
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  46.  11
    Inmaculada de Melo-Martín, David Ingram, Sally Wyatt, Yoko Arisaka & Andrew Feenberg (2011). Book Symposium on Andrew Feenberg's Between Reason and Experience: Essays in Technology and Modernity. Philosophy and Technology 24 (2):203-226.
    Book Symposium on Andrew Feenberg’s Between Reason and Experience: Essays in Technology and Modernity Content Type Journal Article Pages 203-226 DOI 10.1007/s13347-011-0017-8 Authors Inmaculada de Melo-Martín, Division of Medical Ethics, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA David B. Ingram, Loyola University Chicago, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL 60626, USA Sally Wyatt, e-Humanities Group, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) & Maastricht University, Cruquiusweg 31, 1019 AT Amsterdam, The Netherlands Yoko Arisaka, Forschungsinstitut für Philosophie Hannover, (...)
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  47.  8
    David Ingram (2003). The Long Path to Nearness. International Studies in Philosophy 35 (2):174-176.
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  48.  14
    David Ingram (2005). Toward a Cleaner White(Ness): New Racial Identities. Philosophical Forum 36 (3):243–277.
    The article re-examines racial and ethnic identity within the context of pedagogical attempts to instill a positive white identity in white students who are conscious of the history of white racism and white privilege. The paper draws heavily from whiteness studies and developmental cognitive science in arguing (against Henry Giroux and Stuart Hall) that a positive notion of white identity, however postmodern its construction, is an oxymoron, since whiteness designates less a cultural/ethnic ethos and meaningful way of life than a (...)
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  49.  11
    David Ingram (1998). Response to Andrew Cutrofello's Comments on Reason, History, and Politics by David Ingram. Social Epistemology 12 (2):127 – 133.
  50.  10
    S. M. Easton, F. Seddon, Robert B. Louden, David Ingram, Michael Howard, Philip Moran, N. G. O. Pereira & Thomas A. Shipka (1984). Reviews. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 28 (2):219-229.
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