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  1. David J. Depew (2013). The Rhetoric of Evolutionary Theory. Biological Theory 7 (4):380-389.
    I argue that Darwinian evolutionary theory has a rhetorical dimension and that rhetorical criticism plays a role in how evolutionary science acquires knowledge. I define what I mean by rhetoric by considering Darwin’s Origin. I use the Modern Evolutionary Synthesis to show how rhetoric conceived as situated and addressed argumentation enters into evolutionary theorizing. Finally, I argue that rhetorical criticism helps judge the success, limits, and failures of these theories.
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  2. David J. Depew (2011). Adaptation as Process: The Future of Darwinism and the Legacy of Theodosius Dobzhansky. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 42 (1):89-98.
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  3. David J. Depew & Bruce H. Weber (2011). The Fate of Darwinism: Evolution After the Modern Synthesis. Biological Theory 6 (1):89-102.
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  4. David J. Depew (2010). Darwinian Controversies: An Historiographical Recounting. Science and Education 19 (4-5):323-360.
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  5. David J. Depew (2010). Is Evolutionary Biology Infected With Invalid Teleological Reasoning? Philosophy and Theory in Biology 2 (20130604).
    John Reiss is a practicing evolutionary biologist (herpetology) who by his own account happened to be in the right place (Harvard’s Museum of Comparative Zoology) at the right time (the 1980s) to hear echoes of the debate about sociobiology that had been raging there between E. O. Wilson and, on the other side, Stephen Jay Gould and Richard Lewontin (xiv). Reiss is not concerned with sociobiology, at least in this book, but with the adaptationism that Gould and Lewontin saw in (...)
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  6. David J. Depew (2009). Paul Crook, Darwin's Coat-Tails. Essays on Social Darwinism. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 31 (3-4):484.
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  7. David J. Depew (2009). The Rhetoric of the Origin of Species. In Michael Ruse & Robert J. Richards (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to the "Origin of Species". Cambridge University Press.
     
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  8. David J. Depew (2008). Consequence Etiology and Biological Teleology in Aristotle and Darwin. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 39 (4):379-390.
  9. David J. Depew (2008). Eugene Garver, Confronting Aristotle's Ethics (Review). Philosophy and Rhetoric 41 (2):184-189.
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  10. David J. Depew (2004). Prudence: Classical Virtue, Postmodern Practice (Review). Philosophy and Rhetoric 37 (2):167-175.
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  11. David J. Depew (2004). R. Hariman, Ed. Prudence: Classical Virtue, Postmodern Practice. Philosophy and Rhetoric 37 (2):167-175.
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  12. Bruce H. Weber & David J. Depew (eds.) (2003). Evolution and Learning: The Baldwin Effect Reconsidered. MIT Press.
    The essays in this book discuss the originally proposed Baldwin effect, how it was modified over time, and its possible contribution to contemporary empirical...
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  13. David J. Depew (2002). Aristotle, Naturalist. Metascience 11 (1):34-42.
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  14. David J. Depew (1997). And Now for a Few Words From the Loyal Opposition . . Biology and Philosophy 12 (3):399-402.
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  15. David J. Depew (1997). Philosophy and the Darwinian Legacy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (3):480-481.
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  16. David J. Depew (1996). Aristotle's "Rhetoric": An Art of Character (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (3):454-456.
  17. David J. Depew, Bruce H. Weber & Ernst Mayr (1996). Darwinism Evolving. System Dynamics and the Genealogy of Natural Selection. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 18 (1):135.
     
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  18. Bruce H. Weber & David J. Depew (1996). Natural Selection and Self-Organization. Biology and Philosophy 11 (1):33-65.
    The Darwinian concept of natural selection was conceived within a set of Newtonian background assumptions about systems dynamics. Mendelian genetics at first did not sit well with the gradualist assumptions of the Darwinian theory. Eventually, however, Mendelism and Darwinism were fused by reformulating natural selection in statistical terms. This reflected a shift to a more probabilistic set of background assumptions based upon Boltzmannian systems dynamics. Recent developments in molecular genetics and paleontology have put pressure on Darwinism once again. Current work (...)
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  19. David J. Depew (1995). Plato's Dialogues: New Studies and Interpretation (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (3):509-511.
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  20. Robert Hollinger & David J. Depew (eds.) (1995). Pragmatism: From Progressivism to Postmodernism. Praeger.
  21. David J. Depew (1993). Aristotle on the Human Good (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (1):127-129.
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  22. Bruce H. Weber, David J. Depew, C. Dyke, Stanley N. Salthe, Eric D. Schneider, Robert E. Ulanowicz & Jeffrey S. Wicken (1989). Evolution in Thermodynamic Perspective: An Ecological Approach. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 4 (4):373-405.
    Recognition that biological systems are stabilized far from equilibrium by self-organizing, informed, autocatalytic cycles and structures that dissipate unusable energy and matter has led to recent attempts to reformulate evolutionary theory. We hold that such insights are consistent with the broad development of the Darwinian Tradition and with the concept of natural selection. Biological systems are selected that re not only more efficient than competitors but also enhance the integrity of the web of energetic relations in which they are embedded. (...)
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  23. David J. Depew (1986). Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics and Evolution: A Philosophical Perspective. Philosophica 37 (19860):27-58.
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  24. David J. Depew (1985). Narrativism, Cosmopolitanism, and Historical Epistemology. Clio 14 (4):357-378.
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  25. David J. Depew (1984). The Literate Revolution in Greece and its Cultural Consequences. Teaching Philosophy 7 (1):84-85.
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  26. David J. Depew (1983). The Narrative Act: Point of View in Prose Fiction (Review). Philosophy and Literature 7 (1):134-135.
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  27. David J. Depew (1982). Aristotle's de Anima and Marx's Theory of Man. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 8 (1/2):133-187.
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  28. David J. Depew (1981). The Habermas - Gadamer Debate in Hegelian Perspective. Philosophy and Social Criticism 8 (4):426-445.