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  1. David J. Rothman (2006). Trust is Not Enough: Bringing Human Rights to Medicine. New York Review Books.
    Addresses the issues at the heart of international medicine and social responsibility. A number of international declarations have proclaimed that health care is a fundamental human right. But if we accept this broad commitment, how should we concretely define the state’s responsibility for the health of its citizens? Although there is growing debate over this issue, there are few books for general readers that provide engaging accounts of critical incidents, practices, and ideas in the field of human rights, health care, (...)
     
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  2. David J. Rothman (2003/2008). Strangers at the Bedside: A History of How Law and Bioethics Transformed Medical Decision Making. Aldinetransaction.
    Introduction: making the invisible visible -- The nobility of the material -- Research at war -- The guilded age of research -- The doctor as whistle-blower -- New rules for the laboratory -- Bedside ethics -- The doctor as stranger -- Life through death -- Commissioning ethics -- No one to trust -- New rules for the bedside -- Epilogue: The price of success.
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  3. David J. Rothman (2001). The Origins and Consequences of Patient Autonomy: A 25-Year Retrospective. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 9 (3):255-264.
    This essay explores the evolution of the tension between the principles of autonomy and beneficence in American health care over the past several decades. In retrospect it is clear that the social movements of the 1960s and 70s set the tone and the goals for the emergence of a new emphasis on patient autonomy. Indeed, the impact of civil liberties-minded lawyers on the promotion of a commitment to autonomy is far more vital than the term “bioethics” commonly suggests. Tracing the (...)
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  4. David J. Rothman (1998). Beginnings Count. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 41 (4):605-611.
     
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  5. David J. Rothman (1993). The Single Disease Hospital: Why Tuberculosis Justifies a Departure That AIDS Does Not. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 21 (3-4):296-302.
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  6. David J. Rothman (1993). View the First. Hastings Center Report 23 (6):S11.
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  7. David J. Rothman (1992). Three Views of History: View the First. Hastings Center Report 23 (6).
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  8. David J. Rothman (1982). Were Tuskegee & Willowbrook 'Studies in Nature'? Hastings Center Report 12 (2):5-7.
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  9. David J. Rothman & Sheila M. Rothman (1980). The Conflict Over Children's Rights. Hastings Center Report 10 (3):7-10.
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  10. David J. Rothman (1975). Behavior Modification In Total Institutions. Hastings Center Report 5 (1):17-24.
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